Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

6353535

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    <<Yes that does make sense. I guess it just seemed weird that the templates don't seem proper for a lot of what you'd want to do. Or it seems like there ought to be a way to play the same sample at a bunch of different velocities which is what I assume something like the D-4 is doing.>>

    Well don't forget that you can always sample at lots of velocities, then delete the ones that give a duplicate sound. I agree it would be better if you could just type in the velocities you wanted to use.

    <<I was also wondering about the controllers. The bit that they jump if your hardware controller is set differently. What about something like that little Behringer thing that comes with all knobs or faders and knobs. (BCR2000 or BCF2000) The knobs are endless rotary encoders with little lights around them so do they know where the software knobs are set and light up accordingly with no jumps?>>

    It will still jump if the encoder is set to a value different from what's displayed on the X2, regardless of its physical position.
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

    Comment


    • #62
      Craig

      Great to finally see someone doing an in depth review of Emulator X 2. I am planning on getting this at somepoint now that you can use it without being tied to one of their soundcards.

      I keep hearing people complaining about the sound/filters and how it does not sound as good as the Emu hardware samplers. I take it you have used the Ultra and/or Classic series of hardware samplers. How does the sound/filters of the X2 compare, more so the filters?
      Just when I thought I was out they pull me back in!

      Comment


      • #63
        <<I take it you have used the Ultra and/or Classic series of hardware samplers. How does the sound/filters of the X2 compare, more so the filters?>>

        Actually, I have not used those samplers...and the filters sure sound a lot better than the Emax

        Anyway, perhaps someone from E-Mu can comment on this, but I believe that the filters use the same algorithms as those in their recent samplers and hardware units that have the same "look at those 55 filters!" feature. So I expect they're probably pretty similar, if not identical. Maybe their D/As aren't as good as the ones in the hardware samplers...?

        Anyway, I can post some audio examples although the 102k file size limitation means it's going to have to be fairly compressed...not really fair to judge fidelity based on that.
        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

        Comment


        • #64
          I'll admit it, I've been slacking off on testing out other features because I got hung up on the SynthSwipe feature. I've been sampling DPM3 waveforms on a sort of casual basis, and have now sampled all the digital waveforms and "spectral" waves. Cool stuff, you really can't tell the difference between the sampled version and the original.

          I was a little surprised that I didn't need to multisample as many keys as I thought I would. Sampling every 7 semitones or so produced seamless transistions between the different sample ranges, you couldn't really hear any difference. We'll see if this holds up on the instrumental sounds as well.

          But actually, this got me into the process of editing and organizing samples, which turned out to be far more painless than I expected. So tomorrow, I'll summarize what I found out, and talk a bit more about sample editing.
          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

          Comment


          • #65
            Okay, here's the definitive word about the filters, from Bruce McIntyre, Technical Support Engineer at E-Mu:

            "I saw your question from the X2 review on the E-MU filters and thought I would give you some background.

            "The Emulator X filter architecture is based on the custom E-MU H series filter chip found in E-MU hardware samplers. The last version being H1.6, which was present in the Emulator 4 Platinum hardware sampler. Essentially, Emulator X software uses our next generation E-MU filters, utilizing new 32 bit floating point code. The architecture is very closely related to the H1.6 but better, more powerful, yet backwards compatible with older filters. This is why the filter types that are now in Emulator X , sound extremely close to those used in the E-MU hardware samplers.

            "Also, as a bonus, one of the filter types in Emulator X2 is what we call “Morph Designer”. In a nut shell, this is a 6 stage definable filter that gives you the keys to the X2 filter engine allowing you to create endless new types of filters which can all be stored as templates and recalled for use on any preset you desire."
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Anderton


              "Also, as a bonus, one of the filter types in Emulator X2 is what we call “Morph Designer”. In a nut shell, this is a 6 stage definable filter that gives you the keys to the X2 filter engine allowing you to create endless new types of filters which can all be store as templates and recalled for use on any preset you desire."



              8-o

              Okay, I think I'm sold right there....... if only there wasn't a hardware requirement....

              Comment


              • #67
                <<Okay, I think I'm sold right there....... if only there wasn't a hardware requirement....>>

                Well it might be worth elaborating on that. I'm sure someone from E-Mu will correct me if I got this wrong.

                If you buy the full X2 package, it comes with a simple USB interface that also acts as a "dongle" in that it's a piece of E-Mu hardware. So even if you don't have an E-Mu sound card or keyboard (the main ways to provide the necessary hardware), you're still okay if you buy the X2 package. This streets for around $300.

                The big advantage if you already have a sound card or keyboard is that the upgrade price from the X is like $80 or something, and if you don't have the X, you can get just the X2 software. Not sure what the price is -- it was sold out on the E-Mu web site. Also, FWIW, Sweetwater said X2s were "going fast."

                I hope this doesn't mean it's being replaced or something...more likely it's people reading the Pro Review and liking what they see
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                Comment


                • #68
                  I did the math and ended up getting the 1212 card with Emulator X straight from EMU and then adding the X2 upgrade. The whole thing came out less than four bills including ship. The card is really hi fi and wonderful and nearly worth the price of admission by itself.

                  That said, we're here to discuss the X2.

                  Can we start a wishlist?

                  I've got a bit of a prob with the 'save' and 'save as' functions. The 'save' works exactly as it should, but the 'save as' addresses the entire bank. If I'm perusing sounds and edit something that sounds cool, I just want to save that preset and it's associated samples to say a user bank. I realise I can drag presets into a user bank, but if I'm exploring and hit on something, I wish I could just hit 'save as' and the menu bit come up with brouse and let me just put that edited preset where I want.
                  -David

                  (the artist formally known as DC before the move to HC)

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Anderton

                    If you buy the full X2 package, it comes with a simple USB interface that also acts as a "dongle" in that it's a piece of E-Mu hardware.



                    Actually, I'm getting a new laptop for music work end of this month. I'm in need of a USB soundcard and could go for an E-mu 0404 USB.... and then pickup the X2,

                    but I have no reference for their computer hardware or the quality of their drivers. I guess I'll have to go hunting for reviews.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      <<but I have no reference for their computer hardware or the quality of their drivers. I guess I'll have to go hunting for reviews.>>

                      Not to hijack my own thread, but I use the 1616m for my laptop and it's a helluva interface. Probably far more than most people need, though...you can run it in two ways. You can insert a PCMCIA card into the laptop, in which case it provides an audio out. Or, there's an external dock that connects to the card through a CAT-5 cable. The dock requires external power and is relatively large, so this is more for field recording. But you get dual mic pres (good ones, too), MIDI I/O, ADAT I/O, headphones...you get the idea.

                      The only thing I don't like is it replaced an Echo Indigo card, which has both out and in; if you want to record with the 1616, you have to use the dock.

                      E-Mu's drivers were suspect early on, but at this point, they've been through a lot of revs and they're solid. The big deal is the collection of VST "powered effects" that are a part of the sound card (like the Creamware concept), but the DSP power is indeed finite -- you can't just pile on a zillion effects -- and AFAIK they won't run over 48kHz, even though the interface will. But the whole way that you can create custom interface setups is very cool.

                      Anyway, not to get off track, but I've found the E-Mu sound cards to offer a pretty sweet combination of software/hardware. I do get occasional crashes, more than "dumb" sound cards, but not at a deal-breaking level -- one every couple of nights when I'm pushing things hard. Frankly, I would never have gotten into the E-Mu sound cards if I hadn't reviewed the original Emulator X, but I feel they are really underrated.

                      Currently my computer has both Creamware and E-Mu PCI cards, and they get along okay although of course, in ASIO-land, I can't access both with a single program. But the way the X2 works these days, I can use it with a host running in the Creamware SCOPE environment as long as the E-Mu card is plugged in.

                      Okay, I'll stop myself. The key point is I don't really "get" why E-Mu cards don't recieve more notoriety, they seem like overachievers to me. Anyone had any problems since upgrading to the most recent drivers? Any other fans out there?
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Hello Craig,

                        How many mega bites does a typical synth swipe patch take up?

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Craig,

                          How about Gigasampler import? Since my Gigastudio 3 is so buggy I can't use it I want to import the GigaPiano II in to somthing. I own an XBoard 49 and have been looking at Emulator X. Emu says they can't be sure if it would work well or not. The said their import function was done by Chicken Systems. Can you shed any light on this? Do you perhaps have GigaPiano II? (it is in the Gigastudio 3 format)

                          Thanks,

                          Dean

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            <<How many mega bites does a typical synth swipe patch take up?>>

                            It depends entirely on how long a sample you take, how many samples you take (pitch and velocity), and whether you edit them. For example, with the DPM3 waveforms samples, I had about 10 seconds of sample time. After trimming them down to shorter loops, there ended up being about 1.5 seconds of samples.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              <<How about Gigasampler import? >>

                              Excellent question! However, I'm leaving for AES in a matter of minutes, and won't be able to check this out until next week. Sorry...
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                what about Mac support?

                                Comment













                                Working...
                                X