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  • Yup! That looks pretty much like what I did. I hadn't forgotten about you, BTW, but the graphic exceeds themaximum attachment size, and what with the upgrade, I haven't yet found the admin options to increase the size.
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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    • Sonar 6.2 to released next week ... some awesome new features. Check it out: http://www.cakewalk.com/Events/NAMM07/default.asp

      Really!

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      • In case you wondered why I've taken so long to post more material, I knew that Sonar 6.2 would be coming out at NAMM but I wasn't supposed to say anything about it until the official announcement. Well now it's out, I'll be downloading it, and carry on with describing the new features as well as seeing if ACT is any easier to implement.

        I'm really jamming on doing NAMM videos, though, so progress will be a bit slow until my videos are done. So be patient, sit back, and we'll scope out 6.2 together.
        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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        • Sonar 6.2 to released next week ... some awesome new features. Check it out: http://www.cakewalk.com/Events/NAMM07/default.asp

          Really!


          I've got it and I'm not impressed. It won't work with my FW1884 and sometimes it crashes upon booting. Three times last night it crashed just opening the software! I'm going back to Sonar 4 until they get the bugs out of it.

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          • I've got it and I'm not impressed. It won't work with my FW1884 and sometimes it crashes upon booting. Three times last night it crashed just opening the software! I'm going back to Sonar 4 until they get the bugs out of it.


            I guess you will have been on the Sonar Forum already (I guess you have a different user name) but I really think you should persevere and get 6.2 running. It does sound as if it's a "local" problem on your PC. Have you done any "DAW" optimising on XP? This might cause you one or two problems depending on what you might have removed.

            EDIT: Sorry Keyrick - I have now re-read the thread on the FW1884 and see you have been there already. Let's hope Bob Damiano can come up trumps by talking with the guys at Frontier! Good Luck..

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            • I too have reverted back to Sonar 5.2 until the issues with 6.x and the Tascam FW-1884 are resolved. The features in Sonar 6 look good, but at this point I'm dependent on the FW-1884 control surface.

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              • I’ve been waiting on this until 6.2 came out, because I knew there were going to be several enhancements. So, let’s get our, uh, ACT together and check it out.

                The scenario: I’m using a Behringer BCF2000 control surface, because hey – it’s cheap, it has moving faders, it fits on my desktop, and it works. The concept behind ACT is that I can use this control surface to control whatever has the focus in Sonar: Effects, synths, mixer, whatever. Let’s see if that’s true.

                First of all, I installed the various BCF2000 drivers, and it shows up under Sonar’s MIDI devices as “USB Audio Device.” Fair enough. The first thing you have to do with ACT is create an ACT MIDI controller surface. This involves going Options > Controllers/Surfaces, clicking on the Add New Controller/Surface button (it looks like a little gold star), then choosing the In and Out port. In this case, the only ports I have enabled are for the BCF2000, so they show up under In Port and Out Port as USB Audio Device for each option.

                The picture shows what the controller/surfaces dialog box looks like after getting the BCF2000 installed as an ACT controller.
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                • It’s important to choose the right preset on your controller in order to work properly with ACT. In this particular case, Sonar makes it easy for you.

                  You need to call up the ACT MIDI Controller window by going Tools > ACT MIDI Controller. A dialog box appears (first picture) and you choose the type of controller you want to use under Presets.

                  You’ll note that one of the options is Behringer BCF2000 (Custom). What this means is that unlike the standard BCF2000 preset, you can ask Sonar to send sys ex to the BCF2000 and create a preset that’s ideal for ACT. To do this, you click on the Options tab. You’ll see, in the comments field, notes about the BCF2000. Then you just click on the “Send button” (see the second picture), and Sonar sends Sysex to the BCF2000. I sent it into Preset 9, as recommended by the comments, then saved it at the BCF2000.
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                  • In the second picture above, note that there’s an option called “Capture Mode.” You have a choice of “match” or “jump.” With match, the hardware controller needs to match the existing programmed value before it will change. In other words, suppose your fader in Sonar is set to 0.0, and the fader on your controller is at –20. If you move the fader, there will be no change in Sonar’s fader until the hardware controller hits 0.0, at which point the two values “match” so now when you move the fader, Sonar will follow along.

                    With “Jump” selected, Sonar plays a Van Halen hit. No, not really. What this means is that in the example above, as soon as you move the fader, Sonar will jump immediately to that value (in this case, from 0.0 to –20).

                    Also note that you can enable this option separately for the bank of 8 rotary controls and the bank of 8 sliders. This is particularly appropriate for the BCF2000, as the rotary controls are “endless encoders” and suitable for controlling synth parameters. Thus, if these are set to match and you want to do something like tweak filter cutoff frequency, you won’t experience any jumps from the existing value to the new value; there will just be a smooth transition.

                    One reason I mention this is because it seems Sonar defaults to “Match.” So, it’s entirely possible you would move a controller and not see the equivalent parameter change on-screen, therefore thinking there was a problem, instead of making sure the values matched.
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                    • There is a certain amount of intelligence built into the way Sonar handles all this, although it can be a little confusing at first when something makes decisions for you. For example, the very first time I fired up the ACT MIDI controller plug-in, I saw that the pan and volume parameters were available only for four tracks, even though there were eight slots. Eventually it dawned on me that was because the project had only four tracks. Doh! As soon as I inserted more tracks, they showed up until all eight slots were filled.

                      What happens if you have more than eight tracks? Well, Sonar has a feature called WAI (“Where Am I?”) that places a colored band alongside the tracks that are being controlled. ACT, like apparently the controller industry itself, is very octal centric: 8 channels of control, 8 faders, 8 rotaries, etc. In the first picture, you can see that the WAI strip is green, and in the upper left, to the left of tracks 1-8. Correspondingly, the ACT Controller plug-in shows that rotary controls R1-R8 control pan for T1-T8 (tracks 1-8), and sliders S1-S8 control volume for T1-T8 (the image only shows 6 controls due to size constraints).

                      Now look at the second picture. In this, the WAI strip has been dragged down so that the controller now affects tracks 7-14. It could just as easily have been 9-16 or any other contiguous combination of 8 tracks. And look at the rotaries: R1 now affects Track 7, R2 Track 8, R3 Track 9, and so; the same situation applies to the sliders.

                      However, note that you can use more than one control surface. If I hooked up two BFC2000s, in theory one could control channels 1-8, and the second, 9-16. I plan to give this a try at some point but first things first – when learning something new, I like to nail down the simple stuff first before I get too creative!
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                      • Hi Craig,

                        This is a bit off the current topic, but have you tried selecting Process-Transpose, checking the Transpose audio box, then selecting one of the Radius algorithms and trying to apply it to an audio track? For many of us this causes a hard crash with SONAR 6.2, while it worked fine in previous versions. I'm wondering how universal this is. Cakewalk has been pretty silent on the subject in the forums. Since the Raduis algorithms were one of the selling features for the upgrade I'd think they'd want to fix this.

                        Regards,

                        John
                        Send lawyers, guns and money...

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                        • SONAR 6: SO, DOES ACT WORK?

                          Right now, I’m happily moving faders and watching tracks sliders move, ditto with the panpots. The buttons work too, but with one puzzling exception: Button B1 and Shift+B1 don’t work. All the other buttons work as advertised. I thought it might be a defective button, but Live responds to B1 and the button of the BFC2000 that Cakewalk designated as the Shift button.

                          I tried a few things to fix this, like including or excluding the button from ACT, trying to have the parameter “re-learn” which button it’s supposed to be, and the like – but no luck. I’m starting to think that there’s something missing in the BFC2000 preset itself and that B1 just isn’t “hooked up” to the software…maybe someone from Cakewalk can comment?

                          While ACT is very deep and there’s a lot we could mention, before moving on to controlling effects you might like to know that the WAI strip also appears along the bottom of Console view (refer to the first picture; the green WAI strip is right at the bottom of channels 1-8), and you can drag it around just like Track view to cover different groups of faders.

                          Another useful feature is that you can shift the controller among fader groups: Track (which we’ve already looked at), Bus (where the faders and pans affect buses), and Main (as expected, the main outs). In the ACT MIDI Controller plug-in there’s a section called Control Group where you can select among these (circled in the red in the second picture), but this is also mapped to button B6 on the BFC2000 (circled in blue). So, you can step through the different groups just by clicking on this button.

                          Okay, on to effects. Remember, the whole thing about ACT is if you call up an effect that Cakewalk has “ACTified,” the hardware controller should work with it too. Let’s see.
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                          • Have you tried selecting Process-Transpose, checking the Transpose audio box, then selecting one of the Radius algorithms and trying to apply it to an audio track? For many of us this causes a hard crash with SONAR 6.2, while it worked fine in previous versions. I'm wondering how universal this is.


                            Well, I just tried what you said, and indeed -- hard crash. I pretty much use the Radius for time-stretching so hadn't caught this. I did check the MPEX transposition, that works fine; also the Groove clip transposition works. You might consider using those methods of transposition until a fix comes along.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                            • I called up the Project5 Tempo Delay because I use it a lot, diddled some knobs on the BFC2000, and – son of a gun, the panel knobs moved too! Cool, Let’s try another one…

                              I have the Project 5 Compress/Gate in front of me now. It works, but I don’t like the way the controls are mapped; it’s a strange combination of rotaries and sliders that I don’t find particularly intuitive. Look at the first picture: As you can see, R1 and R2 do the attack and release – so far, so good. But the Threshold, Ratio, and Input Gain parameters are controlled by sliders 2, 1, and 4 respectively. I’d prefer just to map all the rotaries across the first eight controls, and the right-most slider for the master level (I’m used to master levels being on the right). So…

                              You can cause a parameter to respond to different controller with the ACT Learn function. The way this works is simple once you understand it.

                              First, you click on the ACT control on the effect or the ACT plug-in – it doesn’t matter, they all connect in the same way. Now you move the parameters you want to control, in the order you want to assign them. For example, I moved the three compressor controls, the three gate controls, and level.

                              Then, you move the hardware controllers you want to have affect these parameters, again in order. So, I moved rotary knobs 3-8 and the master slider, in that order.

                              After you’ve chosen your parameters to assign and your controllers, you disable ACT Learn by clicking on the ACT button again. A dialog box comes up (see second picture) that in this case said “7 parameters and 7 controls were touched. Do you want to keep these assignments?” I of course said yes. Okay…now what?
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                              • The ACT MIDI Controller plug-in now shows exactly what I wanted, with Rotaries R1-R8 mapped across the first 8 compressor parameters, and the right-most slider controlling Level. Bingo!

                                But the sliders still retain their existing assignments. I thought about this for a bit, and figured why not parallel the upper controls with sliders? That way I could vary the parameters with sliders or rotaries, it wouldn’t matter. The only change to make was not assigning the manual trigger, as it didn’t seem all that useful to assign to a slider.

                                So, I went into ACT Learn again and did the slider assignments. Check out the picture for the final ACT assignments.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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