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  • #46
    Apologies for that behavior.

    We've identified a few issues with split beat that we'll be addressing in a future update. For now, clear your selection after doing the first split before doing the next ones.

    Keith

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    • #47
      A quick question regarding Sonar 6.

      Can I get the same recording and playback transport control features using my GNX4 (or similar units) in Sonar 6 that I enjoy with ProTracks Plus?

      Thanks,
      tekrytor

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      • #48
        That's an excellent question! I suggest you go to DigiTech's GuitarWorkstation.com site, where there are instructions on how to install the DigitechRPX.dll plug-in for control surfaces (you can download the plug-in from there as well). It should work with Sonar 6 (it worked with Sonar 4 just fine) as long as Cakewalk didn't change the control surface plug-in format. I'll try this myself, but you might get a chance to check this out before I do...if so, please report back and let us know.
        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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        • #49
          Thank you Craig,

          Actually, I asked because I am considering upgrading to Sonar 6 (do not own it yet) and GNX compatability would be a definate PRO factor in my decision making process. But without owning Sonar 6, I can't just try it out myself.

          Your excellet review process here is also a factor, I've been a spellbound reader of yours since the 70's with your GP columns and your "Electronic Projects for Musicians" book, etc; so your reports in this forum are highly influential for me.

          So, keep on keepin' on! It's great to know YOU're trying what we're buying before we buy, too! Especially at the higher end of the market.

          If I might add, it's also refreshing to see that Cakewalk is actively online here. Too many companies are missing the boat by avoiding popular user groups for their products. Another PLUS for Sonar 6! My upgrade to Sonar 6 is not far off at this rate.

          tekrytor
          Steve M
          tekrytor

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          • #50
            My hard drive died awhile ago, and although I didn't lose any data thanks to backing things up (that was a close one), I needed to re-install my programs from scratch. I hadn't re-installed the GNX4 software yet, so your post gave me an excellent excuse

            As I was a little rusty on the details of installation (I installed when I first got the GNX4, and it stayed on there until the drive died), I went to the tutorial I did on hands-free recording with Sonar, and downloaded the control surface plug-in and the command to register the plug-in. (This is all documented in the tutorial.)

            I installed the USB drivers, and the "beta" ASIO drivers. (These have been beta for years now, so I doubt they'll ever be updated. They work, but you can't adjust the latency; you're stuck with 10ms. However, this may not matter, as we'll see.) Then I set up "DigiTech Hands-Free" as the control surface, and it fired right up -- hitting the record footswitch created the track, record-enabled it, and started recording... the Stop and Undo functions worked, in fact the whole thing worked right up to spec. That was quite encouraging, I must say!

            There are a couple things of which you should be aware:

            1. When hands-free creates a track, it record-enables the track but does not enable input monitoring ("input echo"). Therefore, you'll probably want to set a mix of the guitar with effects, and the return from Sonar via USB. That also gives you zero-latency monitoring, as you're hearing the guitar while you play it rather than through Sonar.

            2. If you hit the GNX4 Stop footswitch after recording, recording for the track is disabled. But if while recording you hit Play, that's equivalent to hitting stop except recording is not disabled. If you then hit Record again, you'll continue recording in the same track, as another layer. This is a handy technique if you want to build up a ton of sounds in one track.

            Anyway, thanks for asking me about this...setting it up reminded me just how cool it is to use the GNX4 as an interface with hands-free recording options.
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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            • #51
              One more comment: Yes, Cakewalk is active here, but in all fairness it's because I always solicit manufacturer input as part of a Pro Review.

              A more accurate indication of Cakewalk's activity is in their forums at the Cakewalk web site. I must say those forums are very impressive, both in terms of the quality of the users (they've solved several knotty problems for me) and Cakewalk's responsiveness. Obviously there will always be people who want specific features or who have specific problems that can't be resolved, but Cakewalk does own up to problems and tries hard to track down the sources, and by and large users give them major props for that.
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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              • #52
                Originally posted by tekrytor
                But without owning Sonar 6, I can't just try it out myself.


                Hi Steve,

                You can download a fully-functional trial version of SONAR 6 from the Cakewalk web site (http://www.cakewalk.com/Support/kb/kb20061101.asp). The DigitechRPX.dll plug-in that Craig linked to should work just fine in the SONAR 6 trial version.

                Best regards,

                Morten Saether [Cakewalk]

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                • #53
                  I’d like to wrap up AudioSnap (although you’re welcome to ask any questions concerning it) so we can move on to the other features in Sonar 6. I’ve been spending some time with AudioSnap, and have started to use it without obsessing too much – for example, I was working on some guitar loops, enabled AudioShap, and rendered with the iZotope Mix algorithm without even bothering to tweak any transients. It worked, and sounded, just fine.

                  There are a couple other features worth noting. One is that the "look" of the transient markers reflects their status: Disabled, promoted, selected, moved but not stretched, moved and stretch, user marker that was added manually, and so on. A particularly interesting feature is that the marker head changes color to indicate how close it is to maximum stretch (there’s a limit of 25% of the original length to 400% of the original length).

                  An even more important feature takes advantage of the Auto Stretch feature. When I heard about this, it seemed too good to be true so I gave it a pretty deep test when I reviewed Sonar 6 for EQ magazine. Basically, it allows AudioSnap-enabled clips to follow tempo changes, just like REX or Acidized files; enable AudioSnap before making tempo changes, and the clips will follow along. It will take you some time to render a lot of clips if you’re late in the game of doing a project and decide to add tempo changes, but hey, it works!

                  You can also right-click on the AudioSnap palette’s title bar and adjust transparency. So, you can adjust AudioSnap parameters while seeing the results on a waveform “below” it – cool. Click on the attachment to see transparency in action; this shows full transparency. I’d like to see this option added to more windows, particularly soft synths that take up a lot of space, and the transport.
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                  • #54
                    Unfortunately, you can’t add MIDI events to the pool. But there are still some MIDI tricks. These are mostly holdovers from previous versions, but integrated into the AudioSnap function.

                    One new MIDI feature is the ability to quantize to the pool, which you select in the Snap to Grid dialog. This makes it easy to have synth bass, for example, groove along with a drum pattern.

                    The other MIDI options relate to extracting grooves from audio, then quantizing to those grooves (the grooves can also be saved, and you can load grooves that are included with S6). You can also “write” the groove as MIDI notes, which can be very, very convenient if you want to do drum replacement.
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                    • #55
                      The more I work with AudioSnap, the more facile I become with it – and that’s important, because how you’ll use AudioSnap depends on the material, and the desired end result. There’s no doubt it can be confusing, even daunting, at first. But as you gain experience, you’ll start recognizing what type of material likes what kind of algorithms, whether transient markers are placed properly, and the like.

                      But let me emphasize this is not a “one size fits all” solution. REX files and Acidized files also perform well for time-stretching, so what AudioSnap really does is provide more stretching options. And even within AudioSnap, there are different options like cutting a beats vs. moving transients. And don’t overlook just slip-editing a clip to make it match a particular length; that’s often the simplest and easiest way to go.

                      Musically, I don’t know how much I’ll use this feature; I try to keep the timing natural in a project, although I’m sure there will be times when it will be easier to reach for AudioSnap to fix a glitch than recut a part. However, in terms of creating samples and loops, AudioSnap has already proved its worth over and over. Overall, AudioSnap is such a rich feature with so many potential applications that I’m pretty sure I’ll still be finding out subtleties about it months from now.

                      Again, feel free to ask any questions; meanwhile, I plan to tackle the VC-64 channel strip…it too is pretty deep.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • #56
                        One thing you can’t accuse Cakewalk of is the “not invented here” syndrome. When they needed to do stretching, they adopted Acidization and incorporated a REX player. When they needed some decent signal processing plug-ins, they turned to Sonitus and acquired the Sonitus:fx plug-ins. They looked to FXpansion for a VST wrapper, Voxengo for a convolution reverb, and when they wanted to get involved in soft synths, called on the talents of Réné Ceballos.

                        So now they’ve re-skinned the Kjaerhus Golden Channel, adapted it for 64-bit operation, and voilà – the VC-64 channel strip. Good call: Kjaerhus’ effects are excellent, but being a small operation, the company has never gotten the props it deserved.

                        I was a little put off when I wanted to read the manual for it (yes, I’m the guy who actually reads manuals; you access it by clicking on the “Manual” label just above the VC-64’s Gain control in the lower left) and couldn’t find anything on the Main Section in the contents page. This is important, as it descirbes how the inter-module routing works, as well as the main controls. But it really is there: Click on the manual’s “Index” tab, then double-click on “Routings.” Scroll upward to see the rest of the manual’s documentation on the Main Section.

                        The VC-64 is a multifunction audio processor that is reasonably kind on your CPU. Its roster of effects includes a noise gate, de-esser, two compressors, and two equalizers; click on the attachment to see the plug-in's GUI. Each equalizer has four stages of multimode equalization (parametric, low shelving, high shelving, low pass, and high pass).

                        Yes, Sonar already has most of these functions from the Sonitus effects. But whereas they’re designed to be neutral, the VC-64 is designed to add “character” and color the sound in a subjectively pleasing way, as well as add more functionality thanks to the ability to do internal routings of the various effects. This is a big deal – after giving a brief rundown of each section, we’ll get into some of the applications made possible by the different routings.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #57
                          This is one of the simplest modules, consisting solely of a “power” button, Threshold control, Decay Time control, and meter. Click on the attachment to see its control set. As a result of the simplicity, you can’t set a particular amount of gate attenuation (the only choice is off or on; it's not possible to have, say, -20dB of attenuation in the off position), nor can you set an attack time for “attack delay” effects.

                          However, in addition to gating noise, the processor does offer a useful "effect": “Tightening up” percussive sounds. Set a relatively high threshold and short decay, and you can reduce leakage in drum parts, as well as reduce high-hat/tom/cymbal decays. With full drum/percussion loops, you can sometimes set the threshold high enough to leave the snare and kick sounds intact, but remove lower-level percussive sounds.

                          Granted, a noise gate isn't all that exciting, but it's useful and this one works just fine.
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                          • #58
                            I was very happy to see that the VC-64 includes a De-Esser, as it doesn't seem to be a very common plug-in, and I often have the need for one. As it turns out, this one works very well..."lack of De-Esser" problem solved.

                            In case you're not familiar with the concept, a De-Esser is basically a frequency-selective compressor. The Frequency control sets the frequency above which compression occurs, while the Threshold control sets the level needed to trigger compression. Click on the attachment to see the available controls.

                            As with the Noise Gate, this is a "just the basics" De-Esser with no bells and whistles. But that doesn't mean de-essing is all it can do. Aside from de-essing vocals, I’ve found this useful to tame overly-prominent high hats in dance music drum loops, as well as bring down the “buzziness” of distorted signals with lots of highs.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • #59
                              That's not a typo, I indeed said compressors, not compressor.

                              As expected, each compressor has the usual complement of controls: Bypass, Threshold, Ratio, Attack, Decay, Output Gain, and Input Gain (so you can choose how hard you want to "slam" the compressor if you're so inclined). There's also a cool-looking analog meter that can show input, output, or amount of gain reduction. I will say that I'd prefer three bar graph meters that showed all three parameters at once, but presumably that wouldn't look very "vintage." Click on the attachment to see the compressor GUI.

                              Note that the same interface serves for both compressors. You select the compressor you want with the C1/C2 buttons toward the buttom, and each has its own "power" switch (turn off any compressor you're not using to save CPU power). Be careful that you've selected the correct compressor before you start tweaking; I'd like it if there was a subtle change to the interface (e.g., different knob colors or background lighting on the VU meter) between the two compressors so it would be more obvious which one was selected.

                              But in addition to the usual controls, there are some non-standard controls. One button gives optical or VCA compression curves, and a clean (“smooth”)/warm switch for different sonic characteristics. I found these to be the kind of buttons where you just try one option or the other, and decide which one you like best.

                              There’s also an auto attack/release button; this feature isn’t unusual, but it’s given an unusual name (“PDE”) so you may not recognize it. Also note that the compressors can be thrown out of phase if desired. Dumb idea? Not at all - you'll see why later
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • #60
                                Why dual equalizers? To take advantage of various routings that put them in series, parallel, in the path of EQs to perform frequency-selective compression, and so on.

                                As with the compressor, both EQs share a single UI; click on the attachment to see the EQ controls and curve graphics. You select the EQ you want to edit with the E1/E2 button, and like the compressor, the same caution applies about making sure you have the right EQ selected before you start tweaking knobs. The power button is available for both EQs, so you can turn one off and one on, both on, or both off.

                                There are four parametric stages per EQ (with Gain, Freq, and Q controls) as well as your choice of five responses + bypass: Highpass, lowpass, high shelf, low shelf, and parametric. Note that the Q control is active in the shelf and lowpass/highpass modes. It controls the "gentleness" of the curve in the shelving modes, and adds a resonance bump (yes, just like a synth filter) in the lowpass and highpass modes.

                                The Constant-Q button is an unexpected asset. In a nutshell, a filter with a constant-Q response has sharp notches and broad peaks, whereas one without constant-Q has equally broad (or narrow) notches and peaks. Turn on constant-Q if you need to make deep, narrow notches to get rid of unwanted frequency anomalies yet allow for relatively broad boosts, or turn it off for a more natural sound.

                                The Range buttons have no effect on the sound, but alter the range of the graph by setting the vertical axis to ±5, ±10, or ±20 dB. As you generally want to use the minimum amount of EQ possible, I recommend setting this value to 5 as it makes subtle equalization settings easier to see. Wide ranges (as found on most EQs) can induce people to boost or cut more than they really should so they can “see the curve."
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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