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  • #31
    The Floor POD has a tuner that you activate by holding the Tap button. The tuning indication is actually displayed on the Amp Model selector switch and two-digit LED readout: The readout shows the note name, and the LEDs around the Amp Model selector knob indicate flat (red LEDs light toward the left), sharp (red LEDs light toward the right), or in tune -- the top two LEDs light green. Click on the attachment to see what the LEDs look like when you're in tune.

    When you're tuning, the output is muted (which is as it should be), but so is the headphone out. I think it would have made more sense to leave the headphone out "live," but that's not a huge deal.
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    • #32
      And while we're on the subject of outputs, let's over the available I/O. There are stereo 1/4" output jacks for the main outs, and a 1/4" phone jack for the input. There are also two 1/8" jacks, one for headphones (a concession to the iPod world, I guess -- I'm used to 1/4" headphone jacks!) and another one for an auxiliary input, like a CD or MP3 player. However, with a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter, this is also an excellent place to insert a drum machine. There's no volume control on this input; you'll need to adjust the volume at the output of whatever you're feeding in.

      Another use for this connection, although possibly not an intended one, is when recording into a computer. Suppose you're recording into some software host or something like Riffworks, and have a basic interface, like a SoundBlaster. You could feed the SoundBlaster out into the CD/MP3 input, and monitor playback from the sequencer while you're monitoring your guitar with zero latency, courtesy of the Floor POD. About the only caution is you wouldn't want to turn on input monitoring at the host program, as you'd hear a slapback effect as the guitar went through the host program, then back out into the Floor POD.
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      • #33
        The pedal has two options, controlling volume or wa. An LED to the left of the pedal says "Press Toe for Wa;" when it's off, the pedal is in volume mode and when on, the pedal is in wa mode. Click on the attachment to see the indicator showing volume mode.

        You change modes by pressing in the toe-down position with a fair amount of pressure to activate a switch. As far as I'm concerned, there's just the right amount of resistance -- I think it highly unlikely you'd trigger the mode accidentially just by working the pedal, but you don't have to hit it with hammer to change modes, either.

        The volume control feel is good, with more resolution weighted toward the louder part of the pedal travel, but you do need to calibrate the pedal (as described in the manual) for best results. The wa sound is very cool. It's pre-amp model, so the effect is very much like what you're used to hearing on records; when going through a cleaner amp, you get a very Shaft-like sound.

        First thing tomorrow, I'll record some audio examples with the wa so you can hear what I'm talking about. I must say I like it a lot, though.
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        • #34
          Here's a fun one: Wa in the Treadplate Green model. It sure was a blast to play, I hope you enjoy listening to it!

          This also shows off the wa-before-amp placement, and how that affects the sound. In particular, note the "growl" on the lower strings. As with the amp model examples above, there is no additional processing -- this is just pure wa through amp model.
          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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          • #35
            Now let's turn around 180 degrees and check out a cleaner, funkier wa effect. This is the sound of the wa by itself without any amp model (all models are bypassed when you turn the knob selector knob fully counter-clockwise). This is more for that funky, "chicken scratchy"-kinda sound.
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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            • #36
              Hey! This is an interactive review...anyone got questions or comments on any of this? If not, I'll just keep going along...there's still lots more ground to cover.
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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              • #37
                Well it certainly looks nice

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                • #38
                  Thanks for this review. I'm just getting back into guitar and this looks like it may fit the bill. I have a Charvel with Seymour Duncan Invader (bridge) into a fender Bassman & 4x12 cab. It seems to play a wide range of tones quite well, covering a lot of music styles. I'm used to using the Amp Farm plug in in Pro Tools and have liked it quite a bit. Do you feel this uses the same type and quality of modelling? How are the internal effects, or might I be better using external plugins and hardware in the studio? I was also preparing to purchase a Dunlop Wah. The wah sample you provided sounds great. Would you consider this a good replacement wah? And lastly, how does it sound through an Amp?

                  Thanks again

                  Also, I get the impression you can change the order of the controls and procesors, is this correct? Like can the vol pedal be "Post Amp" acting as a simple level output control, AND like a vol pedal into the amp, helping to control input level from the guitar?

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                  • #39
                    It seems the Floor POD is more like a Spider III preamp than the POD 2.0.

                    For $199 it seems like a good deal until you compare it to the Digitech RP250/350 and the Zoom G2.1u; both of which have more effects and programmibility. Also at $199 is the older Korg AX1500G which has the best user interface but is getting long in the tooth.

                    I would love to see an objective comparison of the Floor POD to the RP250 and Zoom G2.1u
                    SE Systems, pro-audio dealer serving North Carolina

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                    • #40
                      I would love to see an objective comparison of the Floor POD to the RP250 and Zoom G2.1u

                      Well, I don't have a Zoom G2.1u, but there is a Pro Review of the RP250 in this forum, done by Jon Chappell, that goes into the unit in some depth. Once I finish the Floor POD review, hopefully I'll get a chance to put it side-by-side with the RP250 and see what shakes out.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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                      • #41
                        Although so many folks have complained about the sound of the POD2, I do not agree. I think that it sounds fine for a project studio without the piutfalls of proper mic placement, well oiled amps etc.

                        I know I will not achieve Robben Ford tones, but the POD does just fine for many projects.

                        If the wah can be used with the amps, delay and reverb... then I will pick one up. I would have purchased the Vox TonLab SE years ago if not for the price.

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                        • #42
                          I like the Pod for studio stuff, and after lugging a huge pedalboard around, the size is nice for both transport and stage real estate concerns. It's an attractive idea. For some reason I'm having trouble downloading your sound clips, but I'm assuming that we're getting Pod quality sounds here. How do you feel about this live in comparison to analog effects in terms of warmth? And how do you feel about the amp models responce in terms of pick attack etc.? Are they pretty natural in comparison to the original amps? I'd probably be putting it through a tube amp with the controls set pretty flat, if I got one.
                          Excellent dealings with duderanimous, rushfan2112, johnrambo

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                          • #43
                            Well, we need to fix that, as a sound is worth a thousand words...

                            Remember that you need to change the .PHP extension to .MP3 after it downloads, or you won't be able to open it. If you're having trouble with the actual download, let me know what platform and browser you're using and we'll get it working.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • #44
                              Hmm...I'm not sure how to do that! Admittedly you've got a technoklutz on board here...I don't know what conversion software to use or where it might be. Any help is always appreciated! But my question is still on...that being, how do you feel the sound and responce of the models stacks up against the originals? I realise it's pretty subjective, but still, I'd be interested in your take.
                              Excellent dealings with duderanimous, rushfan2112, johnrambo

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                              • #45
                                Well, if you're REALLY interested in my take........

                                First of all, no computer-based simulation is going to feel like a tube amp to the guitarist, even though a good simulation will sound like a tube amp to the listener. Part of this is because with a computer, you're monitoring through non-guitar speakers, at non-guitar amp levels. Run it through a guitar amp, and the equation tilts toward giving it a much more tube-like feel.

                                Second, I am not a huge fan of tubes, even though I think nothing sounds like one. Let me explain...I was raised on tubes, all my guitar amps were tubes. I was sometimes frustrated by the lack of flexibility, the ways tube would age over time, and so on. I felt like a good tube amp was like a good room for reverb: It made only one sound, but it was a great sound.

                                When the POD first came out, I was wowed by the fact that I could get a bunch of really good sounds out of a little box. The sound was a little brash, but I could deal with it. When the PODxt came out, I felt that Line 6's modeling had come of age. And the Vetta II amp knocked me out, not because of how it could sound like a tube (although it sure does a credible job of that), but because of how far I could take it past a tube amp.

                                Bottom line: When I was making a living doing session work, I would have killed for a Variax/Vetta combination.

                                Now to the Floor POD. Line 6 doesn't claim the amp sims sound "JUST LIKE!" a Marshall or whatever, they say "based on" and there's a good reason for that. Even amps from the same production run can sound different. So the question for me isn't "Does this sound just like XYZ amp," but rather, "Does this make good, responsive sounds that get me inspiired?" And for me, with the Line 6 products and with a bunch of other software sims as well (WAVES GTR, AmpliTube 2, Guitar Rig 2, etc.) the answer is definitely YES. And yes, they do sound like the amps they purport to model.

                                That's why I included all the audio examples of the amp models with NO processing whatsoever. Frankly, I was surprised at how much I liked playing through them; I guess I expected a sort of "POD lite" sound. But these are full, musicular simulations, some of which sound like speakers being ripped apart, and others like more "polite" amps. In the crucial clean-to-distortion transition, they did very well.

                                But one thing about sims is you're NOT going to get your sound without some work. I think the pickup settings, drive levels, and the like actually make more of a difference with sims than with standard amps. Here's a quick, semi-related story: When I first played a Variax and dialed through the guitar sounds, I didn't hear that much of a difference. Huh? But when I put the Les Paul sound through an overdriven Marshall simulation, the Tele through a Twin simulation, etc., the resemblance fell into place.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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