Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

10773663

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Isn't that alot of work to emulate the older Vocalists products like the Vocal Workstation that took MIDI input to drive the harmonist? I guess it is a good experiment, but if that becomes the technique of choice then there may be better and cheaper solutions.

    Thanks for looking into this, man!


    Well, yes and no...the thing is, the older Vocalist products don't do the chord recognition thing. So, if I had a choice between one or the other, given that I like to play live, I'd rather have a VL2 and jump through a few hoops in the studio compared to having a Vocalist and needing to jump through some major hoops live. And remember, in either case that MIDI input has to come from somewhere. I suppose you could play a keyboard in real time to provide the source, but not being a perfect keyboard player, I would probably opt to record the MIDI part anyway. At that point, there's not a whole lot of difference between plugging a MIDI cable into a Vocalist, and plugging a MIDI cable into a keyboard and then plugging an audio cable into the VL2.

    But also bear in mind that the VL2 is very basic when it comes to processing. The Vocalists can do tricks like add vibrato and such, so there may be considerations other than the live/studio issue in terms of choosing one over the other.
    CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

    Comment


    • #17
      The chord recognition technology employed in the VL2 is called "musIQ," and was created by the company 3dB Research. It turns out they have a web site with some FAQs and additional information on the process, which actually answers many of the questions raised so far.

      Click here for an FAQ about the musIQ process, including how it reacts to out of tune vocalists, a bit about how the process works (apparently it analyzes chords over time - I didn't know that), and the like.

      Click here for some basics about the approach 3dB Research has taken, and how employing it differs from standard vocal harmony processing techniques. It's more promotional than the FAQ, but is still of interest.
      CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

      Comment


      • #18
        The musIQ website seems to indicate that the device 'learns' a song...ie...it allows for a cappella harmonies.

        How does this happen, do you rehearse a song and then store what it has learned or does it pick up information fromt he intro?

        This is cool stuff. I wonder if musIQ/Digitech is working on applying their technology to pitch to MIDI conversion?
        http://www.tunecore.com/music/frankkitts

        Comment


        • #19
          The musIQ website seems to indicate that the device 'learns' a song...ie...it allows for a cappella harmonies.

          How does this happen, do you rehearse a song and then store what it has learned or does it pick up information fromt he intro?

          This is cool stuff. I wonder if musIQ/Digitech is working on applying their technology to pitch to MIDI conversion?


          What it means by "learning" a song is that it has some sense of the key and tonality that it can use in otherwise ambiguous situations, not that it learns a chord progression per se.
          CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

          Comment


          • #20
            The compression effect is very useful, despite the fact that it only has one knob. Come to think of it, maybe it's useful because it has one knob! Just "goose it and go."

            If you turn it up all the way, you will hear a little bit of pumping so I generally keep it up about 3/4 of the way, where it sounds ideal to my ears. But hey, just listen to the audio example...
            CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

            Comment


            • #21
              The reverb in the VL2 is considerably better than I expected in terms of the algorithms. Like the compression, you don't really have a lot of options: One knob for the amount of reverb, and three different algorithms. But also like the compression, this sure simplifies life, and the reverb algorithms hit the zone you want.

              The image shows the reverb section from the front panel; note that you can also see the compression knob toward the left. The audio example plays voice through all three algorithms.
              CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

              Comment


              • #22
                Once more, the Enhance section follows the "simple is good" philosophy. This is basically EQ, with peaks that enhance the lower end, midrange, or treble.

                When it comes to EQ, I'm kind of a stickler and yeah, I would have preferred high and low shelf with a parametric mid. That said, DigiTech has nonetheless chosen "sweet spots" that work pretty well with my voice, and I presume they would work well with other voices as well.

                The best feature here is the Enhance knob, as it lets you dial in just how much peakiness you want.

                The image shows the Enhance section, while the audio example (not surprisingly!) plays voice through the three different EQ settings.
                CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Here's an example using the harmony options but in context with a piece of music, to help atone for doing one a capella earlier This uses two harmony lines, one nominally a third above, the other a fifth above.

                  As you'll hear, the harmony slides in very naturally; it doesn't sound artificial or weird at all. The chord progression had a lot of minor substitutions for major chords to add interest, but the VL2 was able to follow along. I did mix the voice up higher to make the harmonies more obvious. If this were a final mix, I'd drop the voice back a bit to put the harmonies more in the background. That would give an even "smooth, less obvious" effect. But overall, I think you'll be impressed with what it does to the voice.

                  BTW, just to give you an idea of where we're heading with this Pro Review, I'll next be investigating the harmony options in depth as the VL2 can generate higher harmonies, lower harmonies, and unison effects. Then we'll check out what it's like to trigger the VL2 with something other than guitar.

                  And of course, feel free to ask any questions! And if anyone from DigiTech is monitoring this thread, you're certainly welcome to chime in as well. Remember, one of the best aspects of the Pro Review format is that everyone can interact.
                  CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Craig,

                    Thanks for all the info on this new unit.

                    One more question. Looking at the pictures, it seems that the VL2 is a one-piece floor unit, meaning that it is controlled by stepping on footswitches. Does that mean that if I want to change the harmony parameters, for example, change it from a third and a fifth above to a third above and a fourth below, I'd need to bend down and hit some buttons on the unit?

                    This would be a definite turn off for me. I really don't want to do a live show where I'm constantly popping up and down on stage like a jack-in-the-box in between songs. One of the best things about my Vocalist Performer is that it is mounted on the mic stand right in front of me, but the harmonizing function is turned on and off via footswitch.
                    Michael D. www.mdlmusic.webs.com "I'm tired of rock-and-rolling Let's get married, Honey, let's go bowling" --Martin Mull

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi-- I'm wondering if the Digitech will work when I tune my guitar a half-step back (G is an F#)? I had an old Vocalist Performer until it died-- I loved the simplicity of it. I've had a TC Helicon Voicelive for about a year now--it works great it's just that I'm doing way too much foot stomping instead of playing the songs when I'm picking songs on the fly. 70% of my tunes are back a half step so I hope the new Digitech can accomodate this! I'm REALLY looking forward to the simplicity of this product.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Looking at the pictures, it seems that the VL2 is a one-piece floor unit, meaning that it is controlled by stepping on footswitches. Does that mean that if I want to change the harmony parameters, for example, change it from a third and a fifth above to a third above and a fourth below, I'd need to bend down and hit some buttons on the unit?


                        The two footswitches are for effects on/off and harmony on/off; I've attached an image of the footswitch. But remember that "changing harmony parameters" means something different with the VL2 compared to related devices. I'll be explaining the harmony options in detail soon, but remember that the VL2 determines the harmony based on your guitar playing, so the only changes in settings are whether you want to have two harmony lines or one, and whether the harmony lines are lower than your voice or higher. So the whole point is that one you've decided the kind of harmony line you want, you bring it in and out with the footswitch.

                        However, if you want to turn off a line or change it from higher to lower (or lower to higher), or change from harmony to unison mode, then you would need to bend down and make these changes at the unit itself. You would also need to do this if you wanted to change the EQ or Reverb algorithm, or vary the amount of any of the three effects.
                        CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Hi-- I'm wondering if the Digitech will work when I tune my guitar a half-step back (G is an F#)?


                          This wouldn't be a problem as long as your guitar uses 440Hz as a reference. Which come to think of it, would be an issue if you're working in a context where A=440Hz is NOT the reference pitch...

                          You can do dropped tunings and such, the VL2 doesn't care where the notes come from as long as they're properly tuned to a reference.
                          CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Thanks-- so I'm good to go!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Anyone try this thing with a voice of a female??

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Anyone try this thing with a voice of a female??


                                Excellent question! I don't have any pro female vocalists nearby...can anyone out there run a test?
                                CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X