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  • #16
    I have owned a '66 ES-335 since '68. I bought it from a grade school buddy along with a '66 Deluxe Reverb and paid the handsome sum of $200. for both. Luckily, I still have the guitar, but somewhere along in the confusion of my youth, I parted ways with that smokin' little amp. i was too green to know what I had there. I still love my 335 to this day. At 5'9" the guitar feels fine to me, but it's been with me so long, I guess I wouldn't know any different. I have a '73 hollow body Les Paul Signature as well. About identical in size, the most noticeable difference being the lower horn is shaped like a L.P. The electronics are quite unusual as well. My biggest 'fit' problem with these guitars is not body size, but rather the width of the neck. I have an xl or xxl glove size, and that's a lot of hand on such narrow necks.

    While I am quite curious to see this new model, and have been since I first read about it some time ago, I don't know that I am expecting to be won over when I finally get one in my hands. The reason being, over the last several years every time I have looked at a new Gibson product, I was shocked by the build quality, or more accurately, the lack of. Even a '92 Custom Shop L.P. Custom that I purchased was so flawed that Gibson sent me a new one. That one was worse. File marks and score marks in the neck binding, areas of the neck binding that didn't get any lacquer and are stark white as compared to the rest of the antique white butter color of the guitar. File mars in the fingerboard. Score marks in the neck binding overlapping the fret ends, and on and on. At least the neck didn't come loose and the paint crack within a week like the first one. Other Gibsons I have looked at in shops, or ones purchased by friends, were not much better or even worse. In todays' world of technology, and with the fierce competition in the industry, I would think Gibson would be more diligent and demanding. But somehow they manage to press on. In spite of the fact that Asian factories are building incredibly precise instruments for a fraction of the cost.

    What words of encouragement would you have for a doubting Thomas like me, Jon. Is their attention to detail on the money with this one?
    www.brookwoodleather.com (owner/artisan)
    http://www.myspace.com/bobbyschell

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    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by otaypanky
      View Post

      I have owned a '66 ES-335 since '68. I bought it from a grade school buddy along with a '66 Deluxe Reverb and paid the handsome sum of $200. for both. Luckily, I still have the guitar, but somewhere along in the confusion of my youth, I parted ways with that smokin' little amp. i was too green to know what I had there. I still love my 335 to this day. At 5'9" the guitar feels fine to me, but it's been with me so long, I guess I wouldn't know any different. I have a '73 hollow body Les Paul Signature as well. About identical in size, the most noticeable difference being the lower horn is shaped like a L.P. The electronics are quite unusual as well. My biggest 'fit' problem with these guitars is not body size, but rather the width of the neck. I have an xl or xxl glove size, and that's a lot of hand on such narrow necks.

      While I am quite curious to see this new model, and have been since I first read about it some time ago, I don't know that I am expecting to be won over when I finally get one in my hands. The reason being, over the last several years every time I have looked at a new Gibson product, I was shocked by the build quality, or more accurately, the lack of. Even a '92 Custom Shop L.P. Custom that I purchased was so flawed that Gibson sent me a new one. That one was worse. File marks and score marks in the neck binding, areas of the neck binding that didn't get any lacquer and are stark white as compared to the rest of the antique white butter color of the guitar. File mars in the fingerboard. Score marks in the neck binding overlapping the fret ends, and on and on. At least the neck didn't come loose and the paint crack within a week like the first one. Other Gibsons I have looked at in shops, or ones purchased by friends, were not much better or even worse. In todays' world of technology, and with the fierce competition in the industry, I would think Gibson would be more diligent and demanding. But somehow they manage to press on. In spite of the fact that Asian factories are building incredibly precise instruments for a fraction of the cost.

      What words of encouragement would you have for a doubting Thomas like me, Jon. Is their attention to detail on the money with this one?




      I have a 66 as well, when compared to today's 335s I'm always disappointed. "Orange peel, file marks, bad cut nuts...those things don't change the fact the Gibson's still sound good. Before this thread goes south, I'd like to state I bought a new LP Standard a while back and other than a some "orange peel" finish flaws, it's perfect (I love the chambered body ).

      BTW- My 66 with Bisby weights 8.4 lbs.

      Comment


      • #18








        Here's my sweet old '66. I decided I have to go and check out this new one Jon wrote about. He's definitely got me curious now ~
        www.brookwoodleather.com (owner/artisan)
        http://www.myspace.com/bobbyschell

        Comment


        • #19






          Quote Originally Posted by barndream
          View Post

          The one concern I have is the placement of the jack on the rim. I almost always play seated, and from the photos it looks like the jack would be on top of my right thigh.



          Jon, did you play it sitting down, and was that an issue?




          I play mostly sitting down, too, and it's not a problem if you put the waist of the guitar on your right thigh, as nature intended. I don't have tree-trunk legs, but the jack is a mile away--not even close, even if I were, as Hartley Peavey likes to say, "A big ol' hairy-legged country boy." So it's a non issue.



          Also, if you balance the waist on your left leg, classical-style, the jack (and protruding cord) falls conveniently between your legs. The only time the jack and cord do become a problem is if you like to balance the rim right on top of your right leg. I sometimes do this, but only momentarily (like when working out a fingering up high on the neck), and I don't need to be plugged in.
          Jon Chappell
          Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
          Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

          Comment


          • #20






            Quote Originally Posted by otaypanky
            View Post

            While I am quite curious to see this new model, and have been since I first read about it some time ago, I don't know that I am expecting to be won over when I finally get one in my hands. The reason being, over the last several years every time I have looked at a new Gibson product, I was shocked by the build quality, or more accurately, the lack of.




            Yes, every guitar is an individual creation, and for $1800 and with "Gibson" on the headstock, you should expect perfection. Fortunately, even if you buy over the Internet, you can exchange the guitar.











            Quote Originally Posted by otaypanky
            View Post

            Even a '92 Custom Shop L.P. Custom that I purchased was so flawed that Gibson sent me a new one. That one was worse. File marks and score marks in the neck binding, areas of the neck binding that didn't get any lacquer and are stark white as compared to the rest of the antique white butter color of the guitar. File mars in the fingerboard. Score marks in the neck binding overlapping the fret ends, and on and on. At least the neck didn't come loose and the paint crack within a week like the first one. ...

            What words of encouragement would you have for a doubting Thomas like me, Jon. Is their attention to detail on the money with this one?




            Wow. Sounds like you've had more than your share of bad luck. I can say is this: the guitar is worth the money, and I can say that because the two I received (and they're not hand picked, they're sent right off to the reviewer in the closed box) were impeccable. If they weren't, I'd tell you. And if I bought one and it wasn't perfect, I'd exchange it. If that one wasn't perfect either, I'd abandon the "sight unseen" approach and buy it from the showroom floor directly. (As guitarists, we're lucky in that we can assess a guitar very quickly by looking at it--unlike, say, the automobile shopper.)



            But inherently--that is, without a flaw introduced in the realization of the ideal--the guitar is worth it. But you have to love the 335 and you have to be attracted to a slightly smaller body size. As I said, I used to see pictures of myself with a 335 and always cringed at the size of the guitar in relation to my body. This is much more scale to my frame.



            I'm also liking the guitar for its own sake, and not just as a "scaled-down-335." The pickups reveal that the sound is different. Brighter in the bridge pickup, and not necessarily superior to the 335, but different. I ended up lowering it slightly, and I like the sound better. I think this guitar might appeal to a younger rock player who won't necessarily have the 335 as a reference.



            Hey, I noticed your '66 doesn't have a stop tailpiece. Another reason to consider the 339.
            Jon Chappell
            Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
            Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

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            • #21
              Thanks for the reply there, Jon. Surprisingly, I get nice sustain with that trapeze tailpiece. I was curious when that I first saw the hollowbody LP too. I just like the more organic feel of a semi-hollow. Beside the 335 and the '73 LP Signature hollowbody, I'm lucky enough to have found an Epiphone LP Sig. hollowbody some years back. Compared to the original, the model is also downsized a tad, but probably not as much as the difference you showed in your pics of the 339. The slightly smaller body is instantly comfortable, and seems every bit as full sounding as it's older brother. I don't have a full pic of it handy, but this may give you an idea of the body shape if you haven't seen one.

              www.brookwoodleather.com (owner/artisan)
              http://www.myspace.com/bobbyschell

              Comment


              • #22
                i just came.

                i definitely am going to try one out.

                ...after i change my pants of course...
                Good deals with: dacama, moon shadow, williamh, Virex, barney steele, Chickentown, aaronl, grygrx, bland, solly, drummerdarko, TomCray

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                • #23






                  Quote Originally Posted by otaypanky
                  View Post

                  Beside the 335 and the '73 LP Signature hollowbody, I'm lucky enough to have found an Epiphone LP Sig. hollowbody some years back. I don't have a full pic of it handy, but this may give you an idea of the body shape if you haven't seen one.






                  I'm impressed. You must be the only person in the world who has room in his collection (let alone his life!) for a 335, an LP Sig. hollowbody, a 339, AND an Epi LP hollowbody!



                  You're obviously a connoisseur on the subject, so where do YOU think the 339 rates? (Keep in mind it's a Gibson CS issue and the $1800 street price.) Curious ...
                  Jon Chappell
                  Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                  Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Room in my life? Beside my wonderful wife, they ARE my life : )

                    You have a great website Jon. And I can see you a quite a well rounded fellow as well. It's funny, I had just written someone on here for a suggestion for a learning aid to help me become more adept at using my newly acquired Live 6. I jokingly asked if he knew of a "LIve 6 for Dummies". I howled when I went to your page !

                    Living here in south central Pennsylvania is wonderful. Until you want to get a hold of something out of the ordinary musically speaking. I had to drive 200 miles round trip for my last Strat. My most local G.C. didn't even have the bread and butter Deluxe Reverb Re-Issue for what must have been 6 months. So as much as I want to try one of these out, I'm not holding out any great hopes of being able to play one unless I drive a couple of hours to Philly or out of state. The formula seems right for sure. The price point seems fair, assuming the build quality is as good as the ones you have played. And I'm convinced the smaller body will sound as full as it's larger sibling. For me, the stop bar tail piece would be a nice change too. Spring will be here soon and I have a Ducati that hopefully will be finding a new home, so having the coin might become a reality. It looks like the stars are lining up ~ All I will need to do is locate one ~ lol
                    www.brookwoodleather.com (owner/artisan)
                    http://www.myspace.com/bobbyschell

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I'm 6'4" and most guitars don't fit me when I'm playing them sitting down.



                      I happen to love the sound of a Les Paul but even at a gig while playing standing I actually had an ole geezer approach me years ago in one of the "animal" clubs and ask me "Is that some kinda 'lectric mandolin?".... It was a les paul.



                      Personally I take points off for "downsizing". For this reason alone I have never been interested in say a PRS for example. As they seem even smaller than a Paul.



                      For my money, they got it perfect with the 335 and monkeydiddling with it...well I don't see it as progress. But people do love anything new and different and it probably helps spur the economy ...I'm not interested.
                      "Yup, the 17 fast in particular caught my ear immediately. Not for the fastness but for the gorgeous color of the sustain. 'Rosy' like some iridescent patina'd crystal."
                      PERVERSE ULTIMATOE
                      BIO
                      http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page...?bandid=529073
                      MUSIC
                      http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page...?bandid=529073

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                      • #26






                        Quote Originally Posted by Jon Chappell
                        View Post

                        Gibson ES-339 Semi-Hollowbody Guitar ($1,799 street)



                        Gibson has been making headlines recently through two high-tech innovations—the slick-looking, self-tuning Robot Guitar and the technically deep (if gawkily named) HD.6X-Pro Guitar System. But the Custom Shop division of Gibson recently introduced another guitar that showed innovation from within the low-tech arena. They revisited the ES-335 semi-hollowbody by addressing its most-questioned design choices: the large size and top-mounted output jack.



                        The result is the ES-339, which is something like an ES-335—but with a smaller body and a side-mounted jack—yet altogether a different guitar and a unique instrument in its own right. I’ve had two review models in my possession for some time now, an Antique Red with a ’59 neck and a Light Caramel Burst with the 30/60 neck. I can say that these guitars have really grown on me—meaning in appeal; fortunately, their size has remained the same. That leads to my most important (and perhaps controversial) point: They are much more in scale to my way of thinking of “guitars” than the 335. More on that below.







                        This is the Antique Red finish. It has a vintage look and a translucent finish that allows the maple top to show through. The top is a nice piece of wood, too, that the photo doesn't do complete justice to here. It's not the highly figured stuff you'd see on a $6k guitar, but the grain is interesting and attractive.






                        Gordeous Guiter in that darker red color and I especially love the tone of the 57's



                        Here it is played clean on You Tube

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIBkI34hZOg





                        Or some BB King Style Blues



                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP8lH...eature=related
                        2011 Mitchell MD100sce Acoustic
                        1979 Takamine F-349 (Martin Lawsuit
                        copy)
                        2011 Fender American Special Jazz Bass (Olympic white)
                        2008 SX SJM-62 electric with 3 P-90's

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                        • #27
                          Sorry, but for $1800 "laminated" anything is too expensive.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I bought an ES-339 . I like it but have some issues with it. I think the frets werent leveled as good as they could have been. There is fret noise. Its not neck relief and Ive taken it to a luthier . He said the radius of the bridge did not match the neck and he was not favorably impressed with the fret leveling.He fixed that and it did feel a little better but still the fret noise. From the 10th to 13th fret its a little on the dead side.



                            I do not want to have the frets filed because they are already too small for me. I am very seriously considering having new frets put in it.



                            you can hear it here on the songs "Chickin Pickin on ES-339" ( a little fret noise doent matter with that) and "Jam for OJ on ES 339"



                            http://www.soundclick.com/artist/5/d...lman_music.htm



                            Its also on the 2nd part of the song (after the quiet interlude part) "ZZ MUSSELMAN" the 1st part of that song is played with a 272 dollar carlo robellie guitar ,see if you can hear the difference between a 272 dollar and a 1800 dollar guitar



                            thank you for your intrest and patience

                            Comment


                            • #29






                              Quote Originally Posted by blimpo
                              View Post

                              Sorry, but for $1800 "laminated" anything is too expensive.




                              arent the 335's laminated too?
                              Formerly known as Spoonie G.







                              http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/7874/spoileri.jpg

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                              • #30
                                Not only are the 335's laminated too, but most great guitars nowadays are!! And this leads me to answer 'search now'...I have 17 guitars, been playing over 55 years, and have been experimenting all those years with various combinations...My guitars range from a 129.00 sx to a 3,000.00 ES175...when I play the same tune with them all I allways seem to sound like 'me' because I go out of my way to adjust my pups and various amps for the sound I like...now its true that various pups will elicit certain sounds e.g. strat bridge vs 175 neck etc...but the nuances are slight. I also have the ES339 and feel, for the money, Gibson has introduced a long awaited lighter version of the 335...the sound diferential is slight and, lets face it, in a band situation no one will ascertain those differences!
                                Don't fix it if it aint broke.

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