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  • Thanks Tony! I haven't been able to demo the M3 and the Radias module seperately to get an A/B view from them. I'm glad to hear that the core functionallity was retained. I need to weigh for myself if the loss of knobs and arpeggiator is worth the cost of the radias module or the EXB. The M3 and the Radias module do look amazing side by side.
    "Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime is death."
    - George Orwell, 1984

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    • Very helpful info, Tony. I must say, though, the idea of a Radias with a touch screen appeals to me Besides, there are plenty of knobs and arpeggiators in the M3!
      _____________________________________________
      There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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      • All true things listed so far... other considerations besides the abundance of knobs the hardware RADIAS offers:

        The RADIAS-R has it's own effects 2 per Timbre, while the EXB-RADIAS shares the M3's system resources (5 Insert, 2 MFX and 1 TFX).

        The RADIAS-R has PCM waves besides drums, which can be creatively mangled in interesting ways.

        If you have more questions I'll try to answer them.

        Craig - look at the start-up screen when it boots, it'll tell you. Or go to Program bank INT-F.

        Regards,

        Jerry

        Korg Guy

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        • Well it's time to install the EXB-M256 memory expansion board (it costs $99 from Korg; don't bother googling, the prices everywhere else seem higher). Not just because more memory is a good thing, but because I've finally had a chance to get to the version 2.0 sounds in detail.

          The upgrade consists of three separate expansions, two woodwinds/brass and one piano, each of which fits in the M3's internal 64MB of RAM. However, if you want to install all three, then you need the EXB-M256 memory board. Which perhaps not coincidentally, would have space for two more PCM expansions should Korg feel so inclined...

          I listened to the original expansions individually by loading and unloading the sets; each sample set replaces existing samples in the programs, upgrading the overall sound quality of presets using those samples. However, what I soon figured out was that the improvement in quality was such that it really justified adding more memory.

          So, I'm going to add the board and then I'll report back on how long that takes.

          [pause]

          Except it was so simple, I didn't need to do an extra post. Following the instructions in the manual, you just unscrew two screws, take off a metal plate, slide in the memory board until it snaps into place, put the metal plate back on, screw in the screws...done.
          _____________________________________________
          There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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          • Okay, now that the memory's installed...

            The way this works is you load the PCM Expansion sounds from the USB stick to internal RAM. The first image shows the screen that appears without the EXB-M256 installed. The stereo piano is loaded; you can see this takes 63.9MB of "RAM 1," which is the internal RAM, with 5% still free. The bottom line for RAM 2 is blank, because that shows the RAM capacity of the EXB-M256. Note that the piano is selected, and shown as "Loaded."

            If you want to load a different expansion set, you need to first unload what's already in memory to free up space. You do that simply by selecting the PCM Expansion, and touching "Unload."

            The second image shows the setup after installing the EXB-M256. There are several differences: First, all of the PCM Expansions are loaded, and there's still 133MB of RAM left over. Second, they're all shown as "loaded." Third, the little boxes to the right of each PCM Expansion are checked (i.e., they have a red center). This means that, assuming the USB stick with the PCM Expansions is in one of the M3's USB, these will load automatically when the M3 boots up.

            But what if you have programs that use the older sounds? They're not exactly compatible, but that's because programs using the new samples simply sound better. I didn't find any instances where I thought the previous sounds were better, but if you disagree, just don't load the new sounds.
            _____________________________________________
            There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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            • We already covered the sequencer Piano Roll view, touched on KARMA 2.2, and showed how you upload PCM Expansions. But, there are other aspects to the 2.0 upgrade and we need to circle back on them before we cover other things.

              In addition to the Piano Roll for detailed editing, there's now a Track View for the sequencer as shown in the first image. Not only can you see MIDI data in the track, you can do operations that affect multiple measures, such as erase and move. Although you can use your fingers on the touch screen to do this, I found that a Nintendo DS-type stylus (or the kind used with Palm Centro or Treo phones) make it a lot easier to do complex or detailed operations.

              We'll get some more into these features, but it's getting late...yawn...
              _____________________________________________
              There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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              • But what if you have programs that use the older sounds? They're not exactly compatible, but that's because programs using the new samples simply sound better. I didn't find any instances where I thought the previous sounds were better, but if you disagree, just don't load the new sounds.


                This reads a bit confusing to me, so let me help clarify.

                The ROM of the M3 was revised in Version 2, and the only "old sound" that was replaced was the original stereo piano. So any of those piano Programs have been revised to use a new sample set. That is the only instance where you'd be comparing any sounds (mostly from memory - your memory, not the unit's!).

                Recently, we even brought back the original ROM piano as a 4th free expansion, which can be downloaded here:

                http://www.korg.com/service/downloadinfo.asp?DID=1457

                There are some internal programs and Combis which use the EX-PCM03 new piano, and they are clearly labelled with EX3 in their name. If it is not loaded the piano part will be silent/absent.

                As for the Brass and Woodwind expansions, they are all located in User-Bank E with Programs that are newly voiced to show off the new samples, not versions of the ROM sounds with just the samples replaced...

                And if their samples aren't loaded these User-E sounds will have silent or missing elements. This is clear in the Programs, but you may not be sure what is missing in the Combis, which often blend both Brass and Woodwinds together.

                Any Brass and Woodwind Program located in INT-D bank use the original ROM samples, and are not affected by loading/unloading the expansions. So you are getting additional samples with the expansions, not replacing/affecting the ROM.



                I hope this helps.

                Jerry

                Korg Guy

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                • Thanks Jerry, that does indeed help. Of course I couldn't compare a "2.0" M3 with a "pre-2.0" M3 so I was going from my memory, and apparently, what studies show about auditory memory is true...

                  But this also brings up an interesting point. I work with a lot of synths from a lot of companies, and when I get back to the M3 after a period of inactivity, I'm always struck - again - by the clarity of the sound. This time, due to the "doing-videos-after-AES madness," it was a long time before I got back to the M3 and yes, I was again struck by the clarity. I figured this was due to having installed 2.0, but apparently not...well, except for the new brass and piano patches, of course.

                  Thanks again for clarifying things and for continuing to monitor this thread.
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                  There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                  • In fact, now that I think about it...Jerry, I know Korg calls their synthesis process "EDS." But without giving away any trade secrets or anything, could you shed some light on the technology responsible for the M3's particular sonic signature?
                    _____________________________________________
                    There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                    • There are some demo sequences in expanded version that show case some of the new sounds, so I figured it would make sense to post some of that here.

                      The first example is called "Mighty Edelweiss" and showcases the new piano, but there are plenty of other cool sounds that are worthy of note.

                      The second example, "Greetings from Eldar," really showcases the piano and also has some pretty bitchin' playing. Maybe Korg Guy can identify who was doing the playing...
                      _____________________________________________
                      There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                      • Here are two examples with samples drawn from the EX1 expansion (you'll hear why it's important to get the memory expansion so you can take advantage of all the new samples...).

                        "Horn Heroics" has a somewhat classical vibe, whereas "Brass - sFz" goes more into brass section land - think "Tower of Power," but in this case, a little more mellow.
                        _____________________________________________
                        There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                        • "Trumpetations" is also from the EX1 expansion sounds, and it's pretty daring - just some solo trumpets, so you can really hear what they sound like...impressive.

                          "Ablondigas" is another snippet based on the EX1 sounds that gives more of an ensemble feel, while "Flutessence" uses sounds from the EX1 and EX2 expansions...check the very impressive articulations. It also makes a nice segue into the next post, which has some EX2-based examples.
                          _____________________________________________
                          There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                          • "X-Y Inventions" is a sweet little Bach tribute...I kinda wish it had gone on longer

                            "Sax-5-ophones" is extremely impressive. Remember what used to pass for sax sounds with a synth or sampler? Well, we're definitely not in Kansas any more.

                            And of course, for all the clarinet fans in the crowd, there's "Clarinet Moods." Now, even if you're not a clarinet aficionado, this is another track that gives a really good idea of the kind of articulations available with the M3.
                            _____________________________________________
                            There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                            • There are some demo sequences in expanded version that show case some of the new sounds, so I figured it would make sense to post some of that here.

                              The second example, "Greetings from Eldar," really showcases the piano and also has some pretty bitchin' playing. Maybe Korg Guy can identify who was doing the playing...


                              Hi Craig:

                              Errr... that would be a guy named.... Eldar!!

                              http://www.eldarjazz.com/



                              He's a pretty amazing musician, huh?

                              Regards,

                              Jerry

                              Korg Guy

                              Comment


                              • shows the setup after installing the EXB-M256. There are several differences: First, all of the PCM Expansions are loaded, and there's still 133MB of RAM left over. Second, they're all shown as "loaded." Third, the little boxes to the right of each PCM Expansion are checked (i.e., they have a red center). This means that, assuming the USB stick with the PCM Expansions is in one of the M3's USB, these will load automatically when the M3 boots up.

                                But what if you have programs that use the older sounds? They're not exactly compatible, but that's because programs using the new samples simply sound better. I didn't find any instances where I thought the previous sounds were better, but if you disagree, just don't load the new sounds.

                                Firstly, thanks for the VERY informative thread. This, along with numerous YouTube videos and hours of research, has basically made my mind up on which workstation synth to buy! It was a toss-up between:

                                - Korg M3-61
                                - Roland Fantom G6
                                - Yamaha Motif XS6

                                I'm miles away from anywhere that can demo these to me, so I've had to be very careful in my research. I gotta' be honest, the looks of the M3 didn't really float my boat to start with, but the most important things are the sound and interface. The Fantom looks great, and has a glorious screen for sure, but everything I saw and heard just didn't have the "oomph" that the M3 has. I'm really more into synthy, swoopy, soundscape-type sounds, and the complexity and dynamics that KARMA add just blew me away.

                                So, decision made, just need to get the CC out!

                                In the meantime, I have a question on the three new sample banks that are available. Am I right in saying that these basically live on the USB stick, and are (if you want them) automatically loaded into memory on boot-up? I also take it then, from that point on, if you save a "project" that uses one of those new sounds, that bank always has to be loaded in the future for that project to work properly? Makes sense.

                                While I'm here, what formats are supported when outputting a sequenced track to USB?

                                Thanks again for this great resource - I'll let you guys know when I get this beast. Go easy though, I'm an "enthusiastic hobbyist" at best, and play for fun. This will be the first synth of its kind I've ever owned, and I can't wait!

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