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  • #46
    While I'm at it, another neat trick I found is the RV-7000 has a delay that you can use 100% wet with no dry signal. Since its delay time can go down to 1 ms, you can use it when mixing an "amped" (i.e., routed through a Scream 4, the Line 6 device, etc) and "direct" guitar sound to adjust phase offset.

    Thanks for the trick! It's an interesting way of doing things for sure.

    BTW I too have the free PodFarm from back in September, but I can't remember if you can actually run it in standalone; You simply tell the program that you have a UX-1 or something on the drop-down list, and the thing opens up. But quite honestly I haven't felt the need to tweak too much yet, as the out-of-the box tones are pretty good. I'll try it when I get off work tonight.

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    • #47
      UPDATE: Apologies to all; I did indeed use my borrowed UX2 to process PodFarm's audio. If you have an iLok, editing presets outside of Record simply will not work. Let's have better integration of the two programs in the future, howsabouts?

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      • #48
        Referring to the attached image, Record's mixer has eight send controls per channel, each of which can be pre- or post-fader. Like the rest of the mixer, this is fixed; it's not configurable for more or fewer sends, although you can show/hide the sends. When hidden (actually, a better term would be "minimized"), there's a small red indicator (which you can see in the screen shot) that shows whether any sends are enabled.

        Returns are toward the right, and each return has a level control, pan, three-step meter, edit button for the return effect (along with a label for same), and a Mute button (but no solo). I assume the lack of a solo is because if you solo the effect return, you'll be muting the signals feeding the individual mixer channels, which would make hearing the results of any FX a moot point. But I don't see a reason why you couldn't have solo within the returns affect only the return channels.

        The fader section is below the sends, and it's pretty typical: Fader, meter, mute, solo, and panpot. Each channel can be mono or stereo; if stereo, there's an additional width control to widen or narrow the image, with the panpot "weighting" it more to the left or right. A cool touch here is that there's an "LED ring" around the panpot that shows the effect of the width control, with either more or less of the ring illuminated to indicate the stereo spread.

        We'll cover the bus compressor next, and that will pretty much take care of the mixer.
        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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        • #49
          UPDATE: Apologies to all; I did indeed use my borrowed UX2 to process PodFarm's audio. If you have an iLok, editing presets outside of Record simply will not work. Let's have better integration of the two programs in the future, howsabouts?



          I suggest using Reaper -- it runs on windows, linux, and mac and it's free to "try", but there are no feature limitations (just a short nag screen). Not an ideal solution, but it works for these purposes. Also, it helps reduce micro-managing of guitar sounds during tracking.
          Powered by soundware -- http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-so...s-kitchen.html

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          • #50
            I suggest using Reaper -- it runs on windows, linux, and mac and it's free to "try", but there are no feature limitations (just a short nag screen). Not an ideal solution, but it works for these purposes. Also, it helps reduce micro-managing of guitar sounds during tracking.

            Absolutely, thanks. I already have Live, Pro Tools, and even Logic Pro (yes, it pays to live near Cupertino). Right now this is how I edit patches in VST/AU mode. I guess I was bellyaching because there's no way (yet) to edit patches inside Record. But my friends in our little users group who have Reaper really like it; before Record came along that was a good way to get audio "through" Reason.

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            • #51
              The mixer's master section has what you'd expect: Disable all mutes, disable all solos, dim -20dB, control room out, and four inserts (like the main channels). The Master Section is also where you'll find master FX sends and the FX return section, as well as buttons to choose whether to monitor the master, FX send, or FX return buses (you can specify and monitor one bus at a time, as specified by eight "radio" buttons). There are also two "convenience" buttons that display the associated sequencer track or rack module.

              But there's also the unexpected: A bus master compressor (with external sidechain) modeled after SSL's famous bus compressor.

              The first attached image shows the bus compressor and master fader section in action. The meter can switch between VU, peak, and PPM responses, which is a nice touch. Meanwhile, the compressor has the standard controls - Threshold, Ratio, Attack, Release, and Make-Up. However, it also has the same limitations as the compressor being modeled - only three ratios (2:1, 4:1, and 10:1), and you can't get release times faster than 100ms. But, those elements are part of the sound. If you want a more standard compressor, use the MClass one included in Record.

              Speaking of sound, the first audio example is playing back three tracks: ReDrum, and two tracks of Dr. Rex modules playing loops from my AdrenaLinn Guitars sample library. There's no processing other than some light MClass Processing; all audio examples are normalized to 0dB for purposes of comparison.

              The second audio example is the same, except now the bus compressor is in play with a 2:1 compression ratio. The effect "glues" the tracks together a bit more, and increases the overall level.

              Now check out the third audio example , which takes compression to excess with a 10:1 compression ratio and low threshold. Of course I don't recommend these settings, but it gives you an idea of just how far the compressor can go.

              Propellerhead was smart to include the bus compressor, just as they were smart to include the MClass modules. A lot of "early adopters" complained that Reason had a thin sound, but that's because the instruments weren't "produced" with a variety of processors, as they are in the studio. Letting users add compression, EQ, maximization, and stereo image helped beef up the sound tremendously, and Record's bus compressor is another step in that direction.
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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              • #52
                Before moving on from the mixer to the next topic, as mentioned previously Record is designed to integrate with Reason. For Reason owners who want to record audio, the price is certainly right, as is the convenience of not having to ReWire into a DAW and manage two sets of files. But if you don't have Reason and want to get the Record/Reason combination, you're looking at the same street price range as DAWs like Logic Pro, Sonar Producer Edition, Cubase 5, Ableton Live (but not the "Suite" version, with the added virtual instruments), Digital Performer 7, and Samplitude...and you can get Acid Pro 7 for $200 less. So, what does Record offer that the others don't?

                Well, first let's look at what traditional DAWs offer. Most include features that Record does not:

                * 3rd party plug-in support
                * Video window support
                * Surround (on some level)
                * Ability to edit files so they "stretch"
                * Format translation
                * Notation
                * Track Freeze

                For many users, the lack of plug-in support will be Record's biggest limitation and for some, the lack of video might be a problem. But, it's important to remember that Record is not a DAW, but a virtualized studio (with Reason providing the virtual instruments and effects to accessorize that studio). Because it's not an "open" system, it's rock-solid. With all the DAWs I use, the x.0 version always has some problems that aren't resolved until an x.0.1 version appears, but that's not the case with Record. I'm sure there must be some bugs in there, but I haven't found them yet, and the program is still on Version 1.0. Even Reason 4.0, which has been out for quite some time, just released a 4.0.1 version with mostly relatively minor bug fixes.

                Also, the "plug-ins" are optimized to work in this closed system, you so can really pile on the plugs without killing your CPU. Another consideration is that Reason's plug-ins are really, really good. The plug-ins that come with a DAW may or may not rock, or may be lite versions that require more $$$ to upgrade to the "adult" version.

                There's also the issue of workflow. Because Record has pared down its functionality to the essentials needed to record music, it's very efficient, clean, and easy to use.

                Whether these advantages are enough to get you to drop your DAW...well, only you would know that. But they might be enough to convince you to supplement your DAW with a laptop-compatible portable studio, or for that matter, an alternate way to record with your desktop.

                Fortunately there are plenty of demos available online for the various DAWs as well as for Record, so it's easy to discover the tradeoffs, advantages, and disadvantages of the various programs for yourself.

                Enough opinions...back to the review.
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                • #53
                  Before moving on from the mixer to the next topic, as mentioned previously Record is designed to integrate with Reason. For Reason owners who want to record audio, the price is certainly right, as is the convenience of not having to ReWire into a DAW and manage two sets of files. But if you don't have Reason and want to get the Record/Reason combination, you're looking at the same street price range as DAWs like Logic Pro, Sonar Producer Edition, Cubase 5, Ableton Live (but not the "Suite" version, with the added virtual instruments), Digital Performer 7, and Samplitude...and you can get Acid Pro 7 for $200 less. So, what does Record offer that the others don't?

                  Well, first let's look at what traditional DAWs offer. Most include features that Record does not:

                  * 3rd party plug-in support
                  * Video window support
                  * Surround (on some level)
                  * Ability to edit files so they "stretch"
                  * Format translation
                  * Notation
                  * Track Freeze

                  For many users, the lack of plug-in support will be Record's biggest limitation and for some, the lack of video might be a problem. But, it's important to remember that Record is not a DAW, but a virtualized studio (with Reason providing the virtual instruments and effects to accessorize that studio). Because it's not an "open" system, it's rock-solid. With all the DAWs I use, the x.0 version always has some problems that aren't resolved until an x.0.1 version appears, but that's not the case with Record. I'm sure there must be some bugs in there, but I haven't found them yet, and the program is still on Version 1.0. Even Reason 4.0, which has been out for quite some time, just released a 4.0.1 version with mostly relatively minor bug fixes.

                  Also, the "plug-ins" are optimized to work in this closed system, you so can really pile on the plugs without killing your CPU. Another consideration is that Reason's plug-ins are really, really good. The plug-ins that come with a DAW may or may not rock, or may be lite versions that require more $$$ to upgrade to the "adult" version.

                  There's also the issue of workflow. Because Record has pared down its functionality to the essentials needed to record music, it's very efficient, clean, and easy to use.

                  Whether these advantages are enough to get you to drop your DAW...well, only you would know that. But they might be enough to convince you to supplement your DAW with a laptop-compatible portable studio, or for that matter, an alternate way to record with your desktop.

                  Fortunately there are plenty of demos available online for the various DAWs as well as for Record, so it's easy to discover the tradeoffs, advantages, and disadvantages of the various programs for yourself.

                  Enough opinions...back to the review.



                  It may be fare to add that whilst apps like Energy XT etc allow one to chain VST effects in a modular fashion, that they do not allow the CV/GATE patching or modulation matrix of a Combinator either.
                  If you view Record + Reason as a package, you pretty much get quite a comprehensive modular FX package that is far greater than the sum total of it's parts.
                  Thor & Maelstrom can both process Audio for example and there are some very unique ways of processing audio signals in Reason alone that Record benefits from also.
                  So whilst the tool set may look initially "limited" when you add in the CV/GATE patching, Spider Audio + CV/GATE splitters and mergers and the fact that anything from LFO's to EG's, too CV signals, To Redrum Triggers and so on and so forth can be used to modulate effects and the like you do end up with a fairly comprehensive set of tools at your disposal.
                  So you could for example create your own ducking delay or reverb, have a multitap delay via the REV7000 with lfo's modulating the tap rate, signal flows being amplitude modulated, comb or formant filtered and all other sorts of fancy tricks thanks to THOR for example.
                  One could even route a guitar track into Thor and use Frequency Modulation with an inbuilt synth oscillator that is triggered by the step sequencer for some interesting pitched ring mod type effects you couldn't get elsewhere either.
                  I do feel that one needs to address the Reason/Record modular paradigm when looking at it's feature set.
                  It is far more powerful than the sum total of it's parts and allows one to use Record as a rather extensive Modular composing environment if you are so inclined.
                  This is what I like about the concept.
                  I can use it as a straight up recording tool.
                  I can use it as a recording tool with samplers, synths and drum machines.
                  I can take a somewhat Eno-esque approach and view it as a holistic modular composing environment if you will also.
                  Doing stuff like getting looped droning guitar fed back loops, vocoded against custom field recordings and the like as one example.
                  So it can do many things at once depending on how I choose to work at any given time.
                  It is also far more fun to experiment with than say Logic.
                  But I digress.
                  Not saying one approach is better than the other or that Record+reason is the be all and all of recording life, but I must confess the more I dig into the tool set as a combined and constructive creative environment the more surprised I am at what can be achieved with a bit of lateral thinking and a willingness to experiment.
                  Venn Diagram - Artist WebsiteMachinedrum, Monomachine, Analog Four, Octatrack, NordModular, Moog SubPhatty, Novation Nova, Korg MS20 Mini, Maschine, Tassman, Aalto, Absynth, Uhe's ACE & AudulusContact

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                  • #54
                    Excellent, excellent point: I've been saying that Record virtualizes a traditional studio, but I have not emphasized the modular/patch cord nature of that virtualization enough. Thanks for bringing that up!! The way you describe Record it's almost like a modular synthesizer that does recording That's a valid description, and underscores how Record can be different things to different people.
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                    • #55
                      As Record has a lot to do with recording audio ...let's check out the process. Now, I've been very good about recording only MIDI stuff, importing audio, and using the demo projects so I could come into recording audio signals totally fresh. I haven't even looked at the manual, so let's see how easy it is.

                      Since I want to create an audio track, I'll try the Create menu...yes, there it is, "Create Audio Track." (Or Ctrl-T...I'll have to remember that.)

                      Okay, a module called "Audio Track" appears in the rack, a channel called "Audio Track" appears in the mixer, and a track called "Audio Track" appears in the sequencer. So far, so good. Guess I'll unfold the rack module and see what it shows...check out the attached image. BTW I fudged the image a little bit...the mixer track shows up toward the right, but I moved it over because the image wouldn't have fit within the forum's size constraints.

                      It's obvious where to choose the audio input, but it already says E-Mu ASIO Dock A. Normally I have the KB37 hooked up, but I'm not using the keyboard, so I guess Record found the E-Mu interface. Okay, I'll use that and plug in a mic.

                      Turn on Click and Pre (count-in for the click...did this before when recording MIDI, it's on the transport).

                      Click record...do a "human beat box" part into the mic...let's make it a kick..

                      Yes, it's recording....a clip appears in red, and draws the waveform so you know something's happening.

                      Now let's try playback. It's there!

                      Guess I'll do a high-hat track too. Same thing...that works too.

                      Interesting: I didn't have to specify a place to store a song or anything, you just start recording. Better look at the help and see what's up.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • #56
                        That was really simple. I'm kind of surprised, actually.

                        Here's why it's so simple: When you record, Record stuffs the audio into a "scratch folder" that lives in your home directory (but you can change its location to a separate drive if you want). This is why you don't have to name a song, specify a folder, etc. when you open Record, it already knows where to put the audio. Smart.

                        Now, as soon as you actually save/name the song, everything you've recorded (along with rack patch data, mixer settings, automation, etc.) goes into the Song document. Apparently everything except for external data used in Reason (e.g., samples in the NN-XT, REX files in Dr. Rex, etc.) gets saved in one big file, kind of like Cakewalk Sonar's "bundle" file option. However, there's an option to create a "self-contained" file that includes all this external data, so you can share projects with other Record/Reason users.

                        I had visions of this file ballooning to gargantuan proportions as you record and delete files, but Record has the option to delete unused recordings. There's also an "optimize" option that Propellerhead explains as somewhat like defragmenting a disk for this big file. Which begs the question: Is this file being treated as something that would be optimized for, say, solid-state disk drives? Inquiring minds want to know...

                        One last thing about data management: As your files are being recorded to hard disk, if something happens like the power going out in the middle of a take (and you haven't followed my advice to get an uninterruptible power supply, which I only mention every other article or so!), Record can often recover some or all of these "orphan streams."

                        Anyway, before we move on to the next subject, I really, really like the fact that you just open the program, hit Record, and go. That is very cool. I also like the single large file idea conceptually, but with a caveat: If it gets corrupted in some way, I assume you're pretty much out of luck - I doubt whether Record can "look into" the file and ignore the section that's corrupted. So, make sure you back up your projects - which you should do anyway (hint, hint!) but it seems like it might be even more important in this case.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #57
                          Record has a lot of very cool sequencer functions, particularly the arranging and comping. I think the best way to demonstrate this would be to record a song from start to finish. I thought it would be fun to do a cover song for a change, so I've put in a request for permission to use a song by an artist whose work I admire. If he comes through great, otherwise I'll do one of my own.

                          Meanwhile, as I await a reply, we'll go through the ID8 next as that instrument is unique to Record and well worth covering.
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                          • #58
                            Well, I really was going to do a post tonight. Really. But I got hung up playing with Record, which I guess tells you something right there...and now it's late, and time to go to bed.

                            I'll give the details later, but here's the bottom line. Prior to playing with Record I had been editing a classical guitar piece for Margarita Escarpa's next CD using the Sonar V-Studio interface and controller. So when I switched projects, I decided to see if the V-Studio console could control Record in Mackie Control Mode. Indeed it did, so not only did I have my trusty Line 6 KB37 providing MIDI input, but a control surface. I couldn't get the faders to move on playback, but that's probably pilot error; I spent most of my time loading up ID8 instruments (two drums, bass, dulcimer pad, and brass). The transport and jog aspects of the controller worked fine, by the way.

                            The workflow was painless, to say the least. It really was easy to just pile on the tracks. And, I have my first wish list item: The quantization strength parameter gives only 7 options between 5% and 100%. I would have preferred to see a rotary control, or the ability to enter numbers, because for me it seems the "magic number" is 85% strength. No huge deal, but worth pointing out.

                            I also cheated: I was going to use only Record devices, but I just had to stick in the arpeggiator from Reason on the dulcimer pad track. If you're into serious MIDI work, you'll find yourself limited without Reason; however, the ID8 is excellent for putting together scratch tracks.

                            Anyway, it's all good. Better shut down before I fall asleep sitting up But Record is definitely fun.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • #59
                              The more I use Record, the more certain features leap out. For example, I noticed on the mixer that you could click on a button to jump immediately to its associated sequencer track. Makes sense, but it REALLY makes sense when you're recording a series of tracks.

                              I think Propellerheads recognized that having three main, equally important work areas was going to be somewhat awkward, even with two monitors. So, they basically set up what other programs call "screen sets" and "layouts" to make it easy to navigate around. But note a subtle difference: A standard DAW usually lets you create your own, whereas Record has already decided what you need, and implemented it (we mentioned it earlier, where the views map to the F5, F6, and F7 function keys).

                              For this example, I recorded a rhythm track - check out the audio example, so the rest of this makes sense. It's a 16-bar loop with drums, bass, brass, and a dulcimer-pad type sound.

                              The first attached image shows the rack. When you insert an ID8, it looks like the instrument at the bottom of the rack (which currently has a guitar sound I'm going to add). You can go through nine different sound categories, each of which has four easily accessible patches.

                              If you want more sounds, click on the "blue LCD" or type Ctrl-B to access a browser that shows the various patches. You have the same nine categories, each with typically 9-10 fairly sophisticated Combinator patches. The instrument just above the RPG-8 is an example of one of these, with the Combinator front panel showing, but not all the various Devices that make it up. (In case you're curious, it consists of the MicroMix, RV7000 Reverb, three ID8 instruments, a Spider Audio Merger/Splitter, two MClass EQs, MClass stereo imager, and CF-101 Chorus.)

                              The second attached image shows the mixer. Obviously this doesn't show the whole thing, but you can see the EQs, faders, and the fact that various sends are in use.What you can't see is the bus compressor that's adding gentle compression across the bus (I didn't use any MClass effects in the stereo out).

                              The third attached image shows the sequencer's Arrange view, which we haven't covered yet. This lets you deal with clips - move, copy, split, etc. - as opposed to the Edit view, where you modify individual notes and such.

                              So was it fast to put this together? Yes indeed. If there's one impression I get from Record, it's that we're dealing with a very sleek program.
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • #60
                                I've been trying to think of a one-liner to describe Record, which isn't easy...but try this one on for size: It's the missing link between GarageBand and a full-fledged DAW - almost as easy to use as GarageBand, almost as powerful as a DAW.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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