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  • #16
    Time to take a walk...

    First of all, given where I live (it's hilly and has obstructions), it was going to be too time-consuming to get a 300 foot line of sight distance - I would have had to put the transmitter on the roof, run a really long mic cable to the studio, etc. etc. However, I was able to do 200 feet line of sight with no problem by walking to a neighbor's house. In fact, I could do 200 feet with one exterior wall in between the mic and receiver, so even though I couldn't test the full 300 feet, I think that if it truly was line of sight - nothing between the transmitter and receiver - you could hit 300 feet.

    What I can vouch for is doing 200 feet with 100% reliability.

    Now, back to the subject of walls. For one test, I went past four walls and ended up an estimated 40 feet from the transmitter, and it still worked. However, I then walked down to an area that's almost below ground level, and in any event, below the floor level of the studio. That put an end to the signal.

    What this indicates to me is that under normal circumstances, if you're offstage to the side with the mic in your hands, you'll have no problem with signal strength. For any normal stage you could pretty much go anywhere; hte only issue I could imagine would be is if there was an orchestra pit below the stage, and you ended up below stage level, with the stage floor between you and the mic. Even then, if you weren't too far away - I'd estimate 50 feet or less - there wouldn't be a problem. You'd have to be further away, and below the stage level; I can't recall playing any venue where that was the case.

    Bottom line: It works over a more than reasonable distance, and doesn't get ugly when it gets out of range.
    I can confirm what Don said - when you go out of range, the sound doesn't get ugly; the audio just goes silent, as if you had a noise gate threshold set too high.
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    • #17
      Some gear that works fine with alkaline batteries balks with rechargeables (maybe because they have a slightly lower voltage? Different internal impedance? I dunno...).

      Anyway, I charged up a couple of 1.5V nickel-metal hydride batteries and stuck them in the mic; the readout showed 8 hours, 20 minutes of potential battery life. I'll do all my testing with these batteries and see how long they last, but assuming all works as expected, going forward I'm going to keep rechargeable batteries in the mic and two backup alkalines in the mic case.
      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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      • #18
        Some gear that works fine with alkaline batteries balks with rechargeables (maybe because they have a slightly lower voltage? Different internal impedance? I dunno...).

        Anyway, I charged up a couple of 1.5V nickel-metal hydride batteries and stuck them in the mic; the readout showed 8 hours, 20 minutes of potential battery life. I'll do all my testing with these batteries and see how long they last, but assuming all works as expected, going forward I'm going to keep rechargeable batteries in the mic and two backup alkalines in the mic case.


        You probably know this, but rechargeables have a different discharge rate than alkalines. My expectation would be that the battery life indicator will lose some accuracy at best and, at worst, be unreliable altogether. Rechargeables stay more stable during use, but will then drop off very steeply and die. Some devices, like my Zoom H2 recorder, actually have a separate setting for the battery indicator where you can choose between alkaline and NiMH.
        PA: JBL PRX712, PRX718XLF, RCF 745-A, 522-A, 310A, A&H Qu-16
        Lights: AMDJ Dotz TPAR, Haze Generator, Chauvet GigBAR
        www.nextexitrocks.com | wedding band | Columbus, OH | VIDEO

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        • #19
          Well, that's why I'm going to keep the batteries in the mic and see what happens. But, as the battery indicator seems to place its main priority on the last hour of operation (e.g., it flashes), that's where the "rubber's going to hit the road." If I still get a reliable indicator of one hour left to go, then I'm not too concerned with the estimated time issue.

          That said, Line 6 mentions that the estimated time is not necessarily accurate when you first turn on the mic (I presume because batteries always seem to have a little extra juice they build up when idle), and I believe they also mention that it updates every 20 minutes. I suppose Don should be the one to chime in on this, but there might be enough smarts built in to the mic that if it sees a radical change over that 20 minute period, it figures out some kind of compensation...or maybe not...I guess we'll find out.

          Again, thanks for your contributions to the thread, they're both valuable and appreciated.
          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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          • #20
            Wow! I'm so proud of myself...a spambot posted in here at 12:26AM, and was deleted and banned in under 60 seconds. Not that this has anything to do with mics, but that's a personal best for spam removal

            Okay, back to the thread. Sorry for the interruption.
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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            • #21

              By the way - I have a question. There's something in the AC adapter between the transformer and the jack that looks like an elongated micro-football. Is it some kind of filter?

              Well actually, I have two questions...I'm going to try rechargeable batteries with the mic, are there any cautions involved with that?



              Sean is correct ... it is an interference filter. Now that regulations around the world call for wall warts to draw almost nothing when left plugged in but not operating about the only option is a "switch-mode" type supply. They operate at very high frequencies so the filter is necessary so that it doesn't become a radio. The good news is that they are environmentally "green" and they work with any line voltage from 90vac to 240vac. All you need to do to tour they world is adapt it to the wall with a simple adapter.

              Rechargeable batteries are fine for the most part. Nimh would be my choice, you just need to insure that they are true AA size (some aren't). Your run time will simply reflect the mAhr rating of the battery.

              As you mentioned ... Alkaline batteries has a characteristic called "rebound". After they have rested they think they are stronger then they are long term. The battery meter in the V70 simply follows the battery voltage. It actually measures the voltage and then digitally transmits it to the receiver where it drives the meter. So if the battery "lies" then the meter follows it. Just one of those alkaline battery things
              Don Boomer

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              • #22

              • Environment. Line 6 refers to this as a "dynamic environment filter," which doesn't tell me a lot but it sounds like either a non-obtrusive noise gate, or a filter that closes down when there's no input signal. Or something...hopefully someone from Line 6 will explain this to us.


              • The Environmental filter is a combination "downward expander" combined with a "dynamic high pass filter". When in the "norm" or "talk" settings it turns down the output about 6 dB when it falls below a low threshold (as opposed to a gate which switches off). There is also a dynamic HP filter that responds to level and program content. It's what I'd call "semi-smart" in that it acts more severly to quick little bursts (that appear as mechanical taps to the mic case as opposed to more continuous tones ... even short ones) as well as to level. The user also has the option to turn it off but with a pretty low level into the mic it all just goes away by itself.

                At least one other popular manufacturer incorporates a noise gate to minimize handling noise but it is not switchable to off. This could be a giant problem if you set up your wedges thinking your mic were active when in fact they were switched off
                Don Boomer

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                • #23
                  Gentlemen,

                  Thanks for the informative posts. I too have been terrified by faulty ancient wireless technology and have purposely avoided it thus far.

                  Seriously considering this for my DJ service and for vocalists in our jazz group. Please keep the test results coming.

                  Any noise, dropouts, hiss, or other nasty artifacts observed?

                  Cheers,

                  J

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                  • #24
                    Gentlemen,

                    .... Any noise, dropouts, hiss, or other nasty artifacts observed?


                    Nope. 3 shows on it now and no issues whatsoever. The standard issue Line 6 element is very nice. Actually, it's the most articulate dynamic microphone I've ever used, wired or wireless. That said, I received a new adapter ring from Rat Sound so I can use the Audix OM5 capsule on it. Don warns that, due to the reduced output of Audix OM5/OM7 (and possibly others from Audix) that there may be noise introduced. We'll see Friday as I just don't feel like emptying the trailer and dragging everything out just to test it. If I don't like the results I can quickly switch back.
                    PA: JBL PRX712, PRX718XLF, RCF 745-A, 522-A, 310A, A&H Qu-16
                    Lights: AMDJ Dotz TPAR, Haze Generator, Chauvet GigBAR
                    www.nextexitrocks.com | wedding band | Columbus, OH | VIDEO

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                    • #25
                      Gentlemen,

                      Thanks for the informative posts. I too have been terrified by faulty ancient wireless technology and have purposely avoided it thus far.

                      Seriously considering this for my DJ service and for vocalists in our jazz group. Please keep the test results coming.

                      Any noise, dropouts, hiss, or other nasty artifacts observed?

                      Cheers,

                      J


                      Even trying to make it screw up didn't cause problems; the audio just disappeared when I got out of range. When I came back into range, the audio came back. It was pretty much like someone flipping a mute switch, then unmuting.

                      Without a doubt, this system gives me more confidence about using wireless than any other system I've tried. Bear in mind that in addition to doing music, I've given seminars in 37 states and 10 countries, often with a wireless mic. Using the wireless was rarely trouble-free, to the point where I ended up specifying a wired headset mic as first choice in my rider (along with only orange M&Ms, Perrier, and multiple nubiles in the dressing room). Okay, I'm kidding about the last part...but there was also one wireless system that I specifically requested not be used. I won't mention the name here, but it was an analog system that always seemed to have some kind of issue.

                      I have to say that so far, when Marcus assured me that digital wireless was a completely different animal, he's been proven right. I'll keep trying to "break" it but so far, haven't had any luck doing so.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • #26
                        Oh - I should also mention that one of my attempts to "break" it was to put the receiver right next to a 2.4GHz wireless phone base, and used the phone to call my cell so that the wireless phone base would be active. It didn't make any difference to the XD-V70.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #27
                          Nope. 3 shows on it now and no issues whatsoever. The standard issue Line 6 element is very nice. Actually, it's the most articulate dynamic microphone I've ever used, wired or wireless.


                          You don't expect anybody to actually believe that do you

                          The L6 "model" is an example of what the combination of a good dynamic mic element combined with DSP can do. When we did all the measurements necessary to model the other mics we did we realized that mechanics can only go so far in the performance of a mic. Sooner or later you just run out of what you can achieve. But we hold an unfair advantage ...we have DSP at our disposal ... so using DSP we just made a mic better than it can be made by mechanics and materials alone.
                          Don Boomer

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                          • #28
                            ... in my rider (along with only orange M&Ms, Perrier, and multiple nubiles in the dressing room). Okay, I'm kidding about the last part....


                            You mean the part about the M&M's right?
                            Don Boomer

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                            • #29
                              Here's a tune from last Saturday. Lead vocal is the XD-V70. No modelling used, -2 db cut at 200Hz and 465Hz. A little de-essing from the VoiceLive 2. Bass and guitar are both on Line 6 X2 wireless systems.

                              PA: JBL PRX712, PRX718XLF, RCF 745-A, 522-A, 310A, A&H Qu-16
                              Lights: AMDJ Dotz TPAR, Haze Generator, Chauvet GigBAR
                              www.nextexitrocks.com | wedding band | Columbus, OH | VIDEO

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                              • #30
                                So I'm trying to figure out how to demo the mic modeling via audio examples.

                                I could just talk or sing into the mic and choose the different models, but I'm not sure how much that would really show.

                                So I had another idea...run white noise through my studio monitors, set up the mic on a stand so it's in a consistent place, and record white noise through the various models. That might make it easier to hear frequency response changes.

                                Or...I could try the same thing with musical material, so you can hear how the models affect the music.

                                I'm leaning toward the white noise concept, but do any of you have suggestions as to the best way to demo this?
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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