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  • #16






    Quote Originally Posted by Henryswansen
    View Post

    Also, I would love to see an option for a Whammy bar on the JTV-59.




    The JTV-69 has a whammy bar...don't know if you like short scale or long scale, though (it's long scale).



    Personally, I want a guitar that plays like a short scale, but sounds like a long scale. I guess if anyone can figure out how to violate the laws of physics, it might be someone from Line 6
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    There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
      View Post

      The JTV-69 has a whammy bar...don't know if you like short scale or long scale, though (it's long scale).



      Personally, I want a guitar that plays like a short scale, but sounds like a long scale. I guess if anyone can figure out how to violate the laws of physics, it might be someone from Line 6




      I'm playing an Epiphone Firebird Studio at the mo' which I quite like (despite the super heavy neck) and that is about the same as the 59. I've also been looking at some LPs and Fender Jaguars. Very different guitars, I know, but it's fun to read about them and trundle down to the shop to have a play.



      You are right about Line 6. I think they see things in a different way to most. I still don't get the hate that is out there for them. I think it's just a fundamental difference in the way people see guitar set ups. You are either open to it or you aren't. No need to poo-poo those that are open to it though.

      Comment


      • #18






        Quote Originally Posted by Henryswansen
        View Post

        You are right about Line 6. I think they see things in a different way to most. I still don't get the hate that is out there for them. I think it's just a fundamental difference in the way people see guitar set ups. You are either open to it or you aren't. No need to poo-poo those that are open to it though.




        Well given how many amps they sell, apparently a LOT of people are open to the concept



        I've seen the "non-openness" you describe happen with the POD and its derivatives, the Gibson high-tech guitars, software amp sims, etc. What some people just don't understand is that all of these are extensions of what we do that you're free to use or not, as you see fit. I of all people understand that physical amps with tubes can do things Guitar Rig or POD Farm can't do, but conversely, Guitar Rig and POD Farm can do many (many) things no amp can do.



        People don't get the point when they say "Sure, amp sims are great for practicing, or not disturbing the neighbors, and they're inexpensive compared to all that gear." Well, amp sims are also great when you want to create sounds no one has ever heard before, and no one can create with a conventional amp setup.



        I'm not here to get into an argument about whether amp sims are good or bad or whatever. People who want to engage in that, if there are any reading this thread, are welcome to go to my Sound, Studio, and Stage forum and bring up the topic for the 4,676th time. This thread is for people who want to stretch the boundaries, and want to know how far the Dream Rig will stretch them. But paradoxically, it's also for people who in the long term want to simplify their lives. The equation goes something like this:



        [Variax + POD HD500] x DT25 amp = done



        I'm running behind on recording audio examples because I haven't quite been able to decide the "flow" for this pro review because ideally, it would be three parallel threads and a fourth that talks about the results of what's happening with the three parallel threads



        But tonight I think I figured out a plan. I'll record audio examples of the dry Variax guitars (not all of them, I don't think people here would have the patience to wade through that many files!) with an emphasis on the acoustic guitars, which are really quite surprising, and some "standards" that everyone will be familiar with - Les Paul, Strat, ES-335, the Coral Sitar sound, and the like. Then I'll talk a little about the open tunings, and that will take care of the Variax - for now. I won't use any effects or amps, just go direct into the computer and click on Record.



        Then next will be recording those same guitars through "matching" amps and cabs in the HD500. The plan will be to show the pair in the most conventional light possible, e.g., Les Paul sound through Marshall emulation. Then I'll stretch a bit with the HD and present some more "out there," obtainable-only-with-POD sounds. If I come up with any really cool patches, I'll attach them so others can download them.



        I'm not sure how I'm going to handle the amp yet, but I think I'll start off just treating it like an amp - put a mic in front of it, and pretend that the HD500 doesn't exist. My initial impression of the DT25 is that it's a fine amp with or without the Link, HD500 interfacing, and so on. People need to understand that while the Dream Rig is a system, the components are also designed to stand on their own.
        _____________________________________________
        There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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        • #19
          One quick story of why Line 6's approach has definite merit



          I have a really great daughter. She's smart, savvy, and so cool she doesn't even know she's cool. I never wanted to push her into playing guitar or be the pushy parent, so I just kept a lot of instruments around the house to see if she'd gravitate to something in particular. She liked drums, she dabbled on keyboards, she tried out violin, but none of them really "got" to her.



          Then about eight years ago, I was reviewing the Vetta/Variax combination for EQ magazine. I was in the studio, and had called up this almost Frippertronic, looping patch with a gorgeous distortion sound...it was like a sea of tone. My daughter opened the door to tell me it was time for dinner, but stopped as soon as she entered, stood stock still, and her jaw literally dropped. After just standing there for about 15 seconds, she said in a quiet but determined voice, "I want to sound like that."



          That's what made her take up guitar - which she not only continues to play, but is now broadening out into nylon string guitar and playing classical. Before that evening, she'd heard plenty of guitars, she'd picked at some guitars, she's heard me play in concerts. It wasn't like she hadn't heard guitars before. But the Variax + Vetta combination, because of the sounds I was able to make with it, flicked the switch and turned her into a guitar player.
          _____________________________________________
          There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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          • #20
            I loved the acoustic sounds on the original Variax. I even recorded them a couple times, before I bought a real acoustic. For some strange reason Line 6 decide to muck them up after a firmware patch, and I didn't like them at all after that.



            The new acoustic patches on the JTV though are sounding pretty good. A definite improvement.



            Ive had the JTV for a few months now. My only gripe, is that is heavy. It feels like it weighs twice as much as my old school Variax. I'm not sure if the other 2 models are as bad.

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            • #21






              Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
              View Post



              I'm not here to get into an argument about whether amp sims are good or bad or whatever.




              Absolutely. Didn't mean to try to derail this thread. Keep up the good work.

              Comment


              • #22






                Quote Originally Posted by Henryswansen
                View Post

                Absolutely. Didn't mean to try to derail this thread. Keep up the good work.




                Sorry if it seemed like I was addressing you, that wasn't the case. I just used your post as an excuse to get on my soapbox. Not a derailment at all!
                _____________________________________________
                There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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                • #23
                  That's a great story!









                  Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
                  View Post

                  One quick story of why Line 6's approach has definite merit



                  I have a really great daughter. She's smart, savvy, and so cool she doesn't even know she's cool. I never wanted to push her into playing guitar or be the pushy parent, so I just kept a lot of instruments around the house to see if she'd gravitate to something in particular. She liked drums, she dabbled on keyboards, she tried out violin, but none of them really "got" to her.



                  Then about eight years ago, I was reviewing the Vetta/Variax combination for EQ magazine. I was in the studio, and had called up this almost Frippertronic, looping patch with a gorgeous distortion sound...it was like a sea of tone. My daughter opened the door to tell me it was time for dinner, but stopped as soon as she entered, stood stock still, and her jaw literally dropped. After just standing there for about 15 seconds, she said in a quiet but determined voice, "I want to sound like that."



                  That's what made her take up guitar - which she not only continues to play, but is now broadening out into nylon string guitar and playing classical. Before that evening, she'd heard plenty of guitars, she'd picked at some guitars, she's heard me play in concerts. It wasn't like she hadn't heard guitars before. But the Variax + Vetta combination, because of the sounds I was able to make with it, flicked the switch and turned her into a guitar player.




                  "There is no best in music."
                  -- Neil Young, 1987

                  My music pages

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                  • #24
                    Time to hit record!



                    These sounds are the five acoustic guitar models: Martin D-28, Martin D12-28 (12-string), Martin O-18, Guild F212 (12-string), and Gibson J-200. These are all recorded direct into an Octa-Capture interface with no further processing of any kind, other than converting the original WAV files into MP3 format to accommodate the forum's bandwidth limitations.



                    Incidentally, I used dropped D tuning on the 12-strings although not with the alternate tuning options - I just tuned the low E string down a semitone.



                    You can judge the sounds for yourself, but the main point of interest to me is the modeling of the acoustic's characteristic "woodiness." It's one thing to model the tone of a acoustic's pieao output, and another thing to model the body.



                    The 12-strings are a huge improvement over the original Variax. They're bright, but of course, that's easy to tame with a little EQ if you find it problematic in the context of a track...but I like it...shiny!



                    P.S. - I'll be away from the studio the next few days doing seminars, and won't be taking the JTV-59 with me - although I'd like to! I'll have more audio examples after the weekend.
                    _____________________________________________
                    There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Soooo...any opinions on the acoustic sounds? I'll be recording examples of the electric sounds next if no one has any particular comments.
                      _____________________________________________
                      There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        My first post here, so please excuse me jumping in, but this review was the reason for me signing up . Many thanks for doing these, as they're being very helpful in my decision-making process. Right - these are just my humble opinions:



                        1st - very nice indeed... lovely woody tone, good attack

                        2nd - good, rounded 12-string. Not so sure about the beating between strings in a course. Seemed a little too much to me

                        3rd - like the first, but with a lighter sound. Good, but I prefer the depth of the first sample

                        4th - much brighter 12-string - this one's supposed to be the Guild, correct? Although it's a good sound, it seems to lack at least a little of a Guild's famous attack. Same comment applies regarding the beating/detuning

                        5th - nice, very "acoustic" sound. Maybe a touch muffled (or maybe that's me? .



                        All-in-all, very impressive, even though I'd like to hear more of the 12-string samples. Many thanks again!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I really like the Martin D-28. I wasn't a huge fan of the 12 strings, but maybe it's just the mp3 compression. I only had a chance for a quick listen, but that first Martin just struck me as sounding like a really nice accoustic. Amazing. Not having played an accoustic modelling guitar before, does it feel strange playing an electric style guitar and hearing an accoustic sound? I feel like it would do weird things to my brain the first time I played it.



                          Listening back again now, the Martin 12 string sounds nice, but sounds like it has reverb on it. I know it doesn't and I know that the doubling strings gives that effect on the real thing, I guess in the right application it would sound nice.



                          I thought I would like the Gibson more. It sounds a bit lifeless. Maybe it sounds that way when I compare it to the sound of the D-28.

                          Comment


                          • #28






                            Quote Originally Posted by John Laidlaw
                            View Post

                            this review was the reason for me signing up .




                            Ditto. These reviews should not be underestimated when it comes to informing players about gear. The companies should be thankful that dedicated, intelligent and informed people put their time into this stuff. Fun to read too.

                            Comment


                            • #29






                              Quote Originally Posted by John Laidlaw
                              View Post

                              All-in-all, very impressive, even though I'd like to hear more of the 12-string samples.




                              This can be arranged! Somehow, I think I'll manage to suffer through sitting down and playing some more guitar



                              I'll give you some slower picking and slow strums, and a few more chords, which should give a more well-rounded idea of what they can do.
                              _____________________________________________
                              There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

                              Comment


                              • #30






                                Quote Originally Posted by Henryswansen
                                View Post

                                Not having played an acoustic modelling guitar before, does it feel strange playing an electric style guitar and hearing an acoustic sound? I feel like it would do weird things to my brain the first time I played it.




                                Excellent question. When the original Variax came out, I was extremely impressed with the Tele model. As someone who played Teles for years, I thought Line 6 had totally nailed it. But I was talking to another guitar player about the Variax, and mentioned that I thought the Tele was great. "Oh man, the Tele model sucks."



                                Say what?!?



                                I told him I thought it sounded just like a Tele.



                                "Well yeah, it sounds like one, but it doesn't feel like one." I patiently explained that modeling models the sound, it doesn't model wood



                                Anyway, to answer your question, here's the thing. As I mentioned before I worked on the Firebird X, which included doing sound design for the acoustic emulations. Although the feel is of course not like a regular acoustic guitar, it really didn't take me long to get acclimated to the acoustic sounds as just another position on the pickup selector. So, when I picked up the James Tyler Variax and started playing the acoustic sounds, I didn't have to make any big mental jumps.



                                However, what did surprise me about the JTV is how they've managed to somehow emulate the "woodier" characteristic of an acoustic. You almost expect to hit the body and hear a "bonggg" through the speakers. So even though you're playing an electric, the psychological cues keep saying "acoustic" and it's very easy to get lost in an acoustic world with the JTV. I think you might be surprised.








                                I thought I would like the Gibson more. It sounds a bit lifeless. Maybe it sounds that way when I compare it to the sound of the D-28.



                                I can't stress enough that these are the dry sounds, recorded dry. As you'll find out when we start putting sounds through the POD HD500, when you add a little EQ here, maybe a little reverb there...you can really "dress up" the JTV sounds, not just the acoustics. Since we're talking about modeling, think of the audio examples as a model without makeup
                                _____________________________________________
                                There are now 14 music videos posted on my YouTube channel, including four songs by Mark Longworth. Watch the music video playlist, subscribe, and spread the links! Check back often, because there's more to come...

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