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  • Great thanks. Love the idea of being able to match amp, effect and guitar to the original song.

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    • Quote Originally Posted by Ryder35
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      I need to send a clean, unprocessed tone to the game via the standard guitar jack and then use the digital output to send to the hd 500 for effects and amplification. Is this possible?




      I do this exact thing all the time. Connect the Variax to the POD HD-500 using a Variax digital interface cable (one is included with the JTV-series guitars). I think the sound of the modelled guitar is sent to the game and not the sound of the mags: this is what you want IMO because the game models the effects and amps and not the original guitar. There is an originally-acoustic Rolling Stones track I encountered quite early on in the game which sounds much better if you play using an acoustic model rather than the mags or an electric model.



      If you want to process the modelled tone from the Variax and send the mags tone to Rocksmith it is quite possible to do so if you don't mind having to create specific effects chains in your HD-500. You use the top-chain for your designed effects and set input 1 to 'Variax', configure the mixer to ignore the bottom chain, in the bottom chain you put only "FX Loop" and set input 2 to "Variax Mags". Plug the Rocksmith cable into FX SEND on your HD 500 and you're good to go. Make sure there are no shared effects before the FX Loop; you can put things in the shared section after the FX Loop.

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      • Thanks for the info WillerZ. Great to hear of someone using it successfully for this. So you have no trouble with note recognition when sending the modified signals to the game? How about drop d? Can you just select that tuning on the varied and the game recognises it?

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        • Quote Originally Posted by Ryder35
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          Thanks for the info WillerZ. Great to hear of someone using it successfully for this. So you have no trouble with note recognition when sending the modified signals to the game? How about drop d? Can you just select that tuning on the varied and the game recognises it?




          Yep, no problems at all to report so far as Rocksmith goes. The tuning knob is a real time-saver. If you want to make presets for each song on the HD-500 you can set the preset to force the model and tuning on the Variax so you don't even need to touch the knobs on the guitar.



          I have got better since recording this video, but that's all modelled.

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          • I have found a problem with the Dream Rig which is causing me to consider returning the DT25 amplifier part of it. Before I got the DT25 I was using the S/PDIF output of the HD-500 to send the dry signal to my DAW and recording the processed output from the HD-500 USB: neither signal was ever converted to analogue and back unnecessarily.



            Unfortunately when I connect the Line 6 Link cable the S/PDIF output stops working completely, whether I had it set to wet or dry. So I can either have my digital dry OR control the amplifier from my tonal presets but not both. I want both!



            I don't want to connect a 1/4" lead from the Variax to my DAW for two reasons (1) having two leads from the Variax looks weird and feels weird and (2) the signal is being D/A converted in the guitar, losing analogue fidelity in the cable and connectors and in the imperfect impedance matching in the soundcard, and then finally being A/D converted again.



            I can, I think, have the D/A conversion done by the HD-500 if I use the "FX Loop" trick I described above. I don't want to do this either because (1) I have to make presets for this setup for every tone, (2) although I haven't really worked out why I would normally want to have 2 branches in the HD-500 this prevents me from using it and (3) it has the same loss-of-fidelity problems as using the jack on the Variax.



            I can get a dry signal with no D/A-A/D loop if I put all the effects on the top HD-500 branch, pan that hard-left, and have an empty bottom HD-500 branch panned hard-right. The right channel is then my digital dry signal. I don't want to do this because (1) I have to make presets for this setup for every tone, (2) although I haven't really worked out why I would normally want to have 2 branches in the HD-500 this prevents me from using it, (3) I cannot use any stereo effects and (4) if I ever need to use the mono-output of the HD-500 my dry signal will be mixed in to that.



            Are there any other workarounds I should consider?

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            • Yeah, the Dream Rig sucks for reamping, it's my biggest gripe at the moment. There are 2 reasons it sucks, the HD500 can only handle 1 digital output at a time (Actually that's not completely true, the USB output will work at the same time as the link, so maybe there is hope for a future patch), and the only digital input on on the DT25 is the link cable. Also there is no SPDIF input on the HD500.



              What I am doing at the moment is disconnecting the link cable and running the quarter inch to the amp, that way I can hear myself playing something while I record the clean signal from the HD500 SPDIF. Going back the other way, I am running an analog signal from my audio interface back in to the amp. It's not perfect, but it is the best I can do for now. Even if Line 6 could fix the digital output problem, there is still no way to get a digital signal back in to the HD500. I'd love some sort of SPDIF to network cable adapter.



              Line 6 really screwed the pooch by giving no thought to reamping the Dream Rig. It worked great on my old Vetta. All it would require is a SPDIF in and a way to output 2 digital signals at a time. They dropped the ball big time. I'm hopeful that at some point they will come out with an HD 600 that solves both problems.

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              • Quote Originally Posted by dramey
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                What I am doing at the moment is disconnecting the link cable and running the quarter inch to the amp, that way I can hear myself playing something while I record the clean signal from the HD500 SPDIF. Going back the other way, I am running an analog signal from my audio interface back in to the amp. It's not perfect, but it is the best I can do for now. Even if Line 6 could fix the digital output problem, there is still no way to get a digital signal back in to the HD500. I'd love some sort of SPDIF to network cable adapter.




                Interesting. I hadn't really noticed this problem because I'm not into reamping; I'm more of a "record the sound and keep it" guy. If I expect to want to change the guitar sound, I use plug-ins. I thought one workaround might be loading .h5e files into POD Farm 2 which uses the .l6t format, but the file formats are incompatible, and I have not found any translation tool to convert among the various formats.



                That said, your workaround of using analog is the best option I can see at the moment; I also I doubt you'll see a S/PDIF input added to the HD500. However just to put things into perspective, re-amping was done with analog for years, and given the state of converters these days, an extra stage of conversion shouldn't be a deal-breaker even though an all-digital path would be more desirable.



                WillerZ: As to running a 1/4" out from the Variax to an interface, although you will have an extra stage of conversion compared to going into the computer digitally, impedance-matching should not be a problem. If you plug into the interface's instrument input, there should be no loss of fidelity due to impedance mismatches, even when using the magnetic pickups.
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                • Quote Originally Posted by dramey
                  View Post

                  What I am doing at the moment is disconnecting the link cable and running the quarter inch to the amp, that way I can hear myself playing something while I record the clean signal from the HD500 SPDIF. Going back the other way, I am running an analog signal from my audio interface back in to the amp. It's not perfect, but it is the best I can do for now. Even if Line 6 could fix the digital output problem, there is still no way to get a digital signal back in to the HD500. I'd love some sort of SPDIF to network cable adapter.




                  I would prefer to see them enhance the USB audio interface so that it has dry input channels and output channels for digital signals to be re-amped. Then I wouldn't need another audio interface to record the dry signal at all. They wouldn't need to change the casing to make this work as there are no new connectors required; I am not so optimistic as to think they will do it in a firmware update.



                  Has anyone got the POD HD Pro? Does it fix these problems? Can I get a S/PDIF or USB digital dry while using Line 6 Link?



                  I am returning my DT-25 112 Combo, partly because it breaks the dry-out of the HD-500, and partly because the Cabinet Simulated Direct Output doesn't work properly: I hear what sound like digital clipping artifacts whenever I turn the master volume up loud enough to give the tubes some real work to do. The pre-amp clip-light is never illuminated, and the DAW level shows I have plenty of headroom left at my end, so I assume it is happening inside the DT-25. I figure if I can't get a good tone out of there when I am pushing the tubes and it disrupts the rest of my workflow it isn't worth having. If I am going to use an analogue cable and then mic the cabinet myself there are cheaper amps than the DT-25…



                  Phil

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                  • Hi its the stupid drummer again. I have a JTV69 and an DT25 and am considering to buy the HD to complete the dream rig.

                    I was however wondering to get real stereo effects using 2 amps. Is there a way to connect 2 x DT25 to the HD effects board and get stereo?





                    thx



                    jorn

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                    • Quote Originally Posted by jorn
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                      Hi its the stupid drummer again. I have a JTV69 and an DT25 and am considering to buy the HD to complete the dream rig.

                      I was however wondering to get real stereo effects using 2 amps. Is there a way to connect 2 x DT25 to the HD effects board and get stereo?




                      Stupid drummer asks smart questions



                      Yes, you can. The HD500 can send four separate audio streams, while the HD300 and HD400 support stereo. Typically with two DT25 amps, you'd send the HD500 left and right channels to the two amps, but you can also send the two amp block signals out to the DT25 amps. Of course, in this situation you can do stereo only if you're using both amp blocks.



                      There's a page with all the Line 6 manuals, and the one called "L6 LINK Connectivity Guide for POD HD & DT Amplifiers v2.00" will tell you all you need to know.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • Quote Originally Posted by WillerZ
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                        Yep, no problems at all to report so far as Rocksmith goes. The tuning knob is a real time-saver. If you want to make presets for each song on the HD-500 you can set the preset to force the model and tuning on the Variax so you don't even need to touch the knobs on the guitar.



                        I have got better since recording this video, but that's all modelled.




                        Hey... perfect... good video !!! Thx.

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                        • Quote Originally Posted by Tomster
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                          Hey... perfect... good video !!! Thx.




                          Speaking of videos...FWIW, all the music videos of songs on my YouTube channel were done with the JTV-59. Yes, even the "acoustic" guitar parts
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                          • I was fooling around with some alternate tunings on the Variax last night, and came up with a fun open D riff. I opened up Sonar and started to record, only to find that it was unuseable—there was crackling, and eventually everything died and I could get any sound. Restarted, unplugged and replugged USB, etc.



                            I decided to ask the internet, and found I was not alone; there were quite a few comments about crackling and the “crap” drivers. I didn’t remember these kinds of problems the last time I used the POD HD500 as an interface, but then again, I’ve done several updates and such so anything’s possible. I was prepared to have this post be about how to use the SPDIF out with a different interface (which I’ll still be covering) to get around audio interface problems, but thought I’d give the interface/driver issue one more try. I'm glad I did!



                            In case anyone else has this problem, here’s what worked for me with Windows 7, 64-bit. Maybe some of these steps aren’t necessary, but...they worked for me. Before doing anything, make sure you save any patches, Set Lists, etc. you want to keep.



                            1. Use the Line 6 uninstall routine (Start > All Programs > Line 6 > Tools > Line 6 Uninstaller) to delete only the HD500 driver.

                            2. Make sure the USB cable is NOT connected to the HD500.

                            3. Hold down the < (left) nav button and turn on power to the HD500.

                            4. Download and run the latest HD500 drivers from the Line 6 web site.

                            5. At the point where the software says to connect the USB cable, connect it.




                            Now, here’s what’s interesting. Hopefully at this point you’ll complete the hardware installation wizard and all will be well. But in my case, I got a “device not recognized” warning. Ooops. But, sometimes devices get “wedded” to a particular USB port, and installing a new driver confuses matters.



                            So I unplugged the USB cable, and plugged it into a different USB port. Everything went exactly as expected, I booted Sonar and everything worked properly (and sounded very good).



                            However, that was the USB port I usually use for NI’s Maschine or a synth keyboard, depending on the project; I wanted to use the original port I tried to use. So, I plugged in with a different cable (hey, you never know) and this time the desired port worked as well.



                            At this point, once everything's working you'd load POD HD 500 Edit and restore your patches.



                            And here’s your bonus tip, which I found on the Line 6 forums. I had input 1 set to Guitar+Variax and input 2 set to Same. Setting input 2 to Guitar lowered the noise level dramatically.



                            Now, excuse me while I finish recording my riff! When I come back, I’ll have a fun tutorial and a template patch that...well, you’ll see.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • There are a lot of fancy, “wow, look what this thing does” presets in the HD500, but some of my favorite sounds are fairly stripped down—a well-chosen amp, cabinet, and mic. However, although I do like these simpler sounds, I want them to be BIG simpler sounds. This template is designed specifically for that purpose, and I optimized it for the Variax “Chime” emulation. Despite that, though, it’s an extremely malleable patch. With a little bit of synched delay and more distortion, it's good to go for leads.



                              So, let me explain what’s going on here. The patch itself is attached so you can download it yourself (you'll need to unzip it), but I want to explain some of the rationale behind the parameter settings.



                              For that chimey, bright pop sound, the obvious point of departure is the Class A-30 TB amp and 2 x 12 Silver Bell cab. Drive is relatively low—42%—because I’ve found the lower the drive setting, the more defined the tone, with less “smear” (although you can use this to such good effect on big, metal-type patches). In this case, I wanted definition.







                              Sag is an interesting control that’s not to be overlooked. The minimum setting gives the most dynamic response to touch, while maximum is sort of like adding compression, but without any pumping or breathing.



                              Ch Vol is an important control—once whose importance is not stressed enough by Line 6, so we’ll address that here. Many times, I’ve been able to make a “harsh” patch sound sweet by simply pulling back on this control; it sounds to me that if this is up to high, it’s overloading the HD500 internally (i.e., unintentional distortion caused by internal clipping or overload as opposed to the intentional distortion the amp sim is creating). Then again, if this added distortion is intentional . . . never mind! Regardless of the reason, though, experiment with both the Drive and Ch Vol controls and you may find yourself converting patches you wouldn’t normally use into “keepers.”



                              As to the mic, in this case it definitely seems like the 421 Dynamic gives the most balanced sound, which is what I was seeking.



                              For the cab parameters, rolling off the Low Cut a bit gives that “open back” sort of sound. I usually keep Res Level fairly low, but I do like rolling up the Thump a bit to give more “meat” to what would be an otherwise somewhat thinner part, and a little Decay is always welcome.



                              But, the main point of this tutorial is about stereo—using the FX to widen, thicken, and transmute the sound into something more glorious and big. So, let’s leave “mono world” and move on to the FX.
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • First, let’s dispense with the pre-FX, which are fairly straightforward. The compressor is the Vetta Juice, set for a moderate amount of compression. The Tube Drive is waiting in the wings, ready to be engaged, if you want a crunchier sound. It works very well in this context. I’ve enabled it in the screen shot so you can see the settings more easily, but it defaults to being off.







                                If you’re following along with the preset attached to the previous post, enable the Compressor and Chorus, but leave everything else disabled. It will be easier to hear how each effect alters the sound by bringing them in one at a time.



                                The Analog Chorus is being used as a mono-to-stereo converter. This is incredible for “opening up” the sound, but you have to set the controls to create an “anti-chorus.” Here’s the rundown for each control.



                                Speed: Very slow (0.1 or 0.2Hz). You don’t want to hear an obvious modulation, but a more static effect.

                                Depth: Start off with it all the way down, then turn up just enough to kick the sound from mono to stereo. Don’t go above 10% or you’ll start hearing the modulation effect.

                                Mix: 90% to 100% gives the maximum amount of stereo separation.

                                Tone: This is a very interesting control. The setting in the screen shot gives the most balanced sound, but by rotating it you can “weight” the lows or highs more to the left. When recording, this can really help establish a unique stereo image for the part; even though it’s spread in stereo, you can weight it more toward one channel or the other.



                                Now enable the Stereo Delay. The object here is to enhance the stereo by having short, slightly different delays in each channel. Set both Feedback controls all the way down, and set times like 40 and 60ms, 30 and 50ms, or whatever works best. Turn up the mix control to get the right amount of stereo effect. You want the delayed sound to supplement the main sound, not overwhelm it.



                                Next, enable the Tile Reverb. This helps “fill in the cracks” from having the discrete delays, and gives a bright, room type of ambience. Adding reverb is optional, as you might prefer to add it on mixdown if you’re recording; for live, I’m usually not a big fan of reverb, as the venues contribute their own aleatory reverb characteristics. However, the Tile Reverb makes a good case for it being part of the sound.



                                Finally, note the Parametric EQ at the end. This is mostly to compensate for differences when using different guitar sounds or amps (remember, this is somewhat of a “template” patch). For this patch, the brightness needed taming, so the highs are pulled back a bit, and the parametric stage reduces levels a bit at the frequency known to its friends as “70%.” In any event, the parametric EQ is a great choice for rounding out the signal chain so you can add a final tweak to the timbre.



                                If you have an HD500, I think you too will find this is a very useful template for stripped-down amp sounds. The right combination of amp, cab, and mic can give a tone of useful tones.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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