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  • Quote Originally Posted by jorn
    View Post

    Hi,



    I am a drummer - hope I am not intruding.

    What is the best sounding way to the the 'Dream Rig' into a PA?

    Using the HD500 XLR's, Using the DT25 XRL out or miking the amp?



    thx



    jorn






    First of all, drummers are always welcome here! We all know drummers are cool, the only reason for all the drummer jokes is other musicians being jealous that drummers get all the groupies.



    Anyway, the best option for PA kind of depends on how you plan to use the rig. Personally, my last choice would be miking the amp due simply to the issues involved in miking (placement, noise, etc.). However, if you want to get the most authentic amp/cab sound, that's the only option that's not modeled.



    If you're using the DT25 primarily as a monitor, then experiment with both the HD500 XLR out and the DT25 out and see if you prefer one over the other. If you're using in-ear monitors, you may be able to get all the sounds you want out of the HD500, in which case you would use its XLR outs and not need to bring the DT25.
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    • One comment about the Tyler Variax guitar...I was doing some recording recently, and wanted to lay down a scratch guitar track. The Variax battery was charging, so I used the standard magnetic pickups.



      Well, the track ended up being a keeper. Just because you can get all those great models out of the Variax, don't overlook what those pickups can do all by themselves. I was very happy with the sound.
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      • I want to update the thread with my experience with a JTV-89 I got from Musician's Friend at the end of September.



        First, I want to commend MF for their excellent service. Sales, shipping, and post sales support were good. Spoiler: Unfortunately, there were some issues with the guitar I got and I returned it. Even the return process at the end of October was painless. I will definitely buy from MF again.



        I decided to get the guitar only, rather than the whole dream rig based on the discussion earlier in this thread about retailers. I didn't want to decide that I didn't like the guitar and then leave MF with a used guitar, amp and effects board. Seemed like the ethical way to proceed.



        When I got the guitar, the set up was nowhere near where I wanted it. Though I've set up a few of my guitars, I wanted this one done professionally. I took it to a friend who works at ESP, builds his own guitars and has set up a ton of guitars. He did a great job and I tweaked it slightly after that as the guitar settled in (I live in a much drier climate than MF in Kansas City).



        Things I liked about the guitar:



        - Best looking Variax for me. Black knobs with smoked tuners and bridge, cool purple lighting on the knobs.



        - Thin, Ibanez-like, neck profile all the way down to the body. Easy access to all 24 frets.



        - Easy to play once set up correctly.



        - Tons of models and the alternate tuning knob provide a lot of flexibility.



        The main problems I had with the guitar are as follows:



        - Intonation: My guitar could not be intonated correctly, at least with the set up I like with fairly low action. It was still 7 cents sharp on the low E with the bridge and saddle all the way back. The tiny pin that adjusts the bridge position splayed slightly inward on the post and it was at its maximum point. Of course, the strings were loosened before adjusting it. This was a late 2010 build. I'm hoping that they've addressed this issue and I am considering trying another 89 with a 2012 build. Comments on this are appreciated because this is the biggest issue for me.



        - Even slight buzzing on the frets causes significant digital artifacts. I read on the Line 6 forums later that putting a damper under the strings between the nut and the tuners can help reduce this. However, I had returned the guitar by this point.



        - Digital artifacts apparent with some of the models with chords and especially with the 12-string models. This may be related to the previous bullet. I noticed this plugged in directly to a Line 6 amp as well as through my computer running Guitar Rig through headphones. I also noticed it when I was at Long & McQuade demoing a JTV-69 directly through a Fender amp back in early September. I read that this may be related to the setup of the guitar, especially the bridge where the piezos are. Seeing it on two guitars where the setup was to my liking has me worried about this.



        - Cheap feeling 5-way switch. The pickup/model selector switch felt like it was made out of thin steel that could easily snap if hit from the side by accident.



        - Tuners: The tuning stability was not awful but it wasn't as good as even my Traveler Guitar. I will probably replace the tuners with higher quality locking ones if I get another JTV.



        - Palm muting: This is a known issue and has been addressed in November with latest 1.9 update, along with new high-gain models in custom slot 1 which give you access to alternate tunings with a modern sound. The feedback on the Line 6 forums suggests palm muting is much better than before but not perfect.



        I realize that Line 6 has built an amazingly versatile guitar at a reasonably affordable price point. I really want one (that works properly) and they are trying hard to address the issues they can with the updates. I don't mind spending money on better tuners and professional setup. My main concerns are the intonation and the digital artifacts. I welcome any comments on these issues.

        Comment


        • My patience has worn thin with the so-called "Dream Rig". I'm writing this in the hope that I can save someone some anguish.



          Fellow Tone Travelers:



          I have owned the JTV-69 and the HD500 Pod for just under a year now. The guitar is fine, does the job of replacing 5/6 guitars at a gig, so no complaints there. However, I have struggled valiantly with the JTV + HD500 combo, trying to get my "2/3" of a Dream Rig to work for me. I have invested way too much time in trying to get the system to work consistently, and finally ended up with just using it to switch modes on the JTV - a complete waste of money, IMO. Since I find that I get better tone from my regular pedal board, anyway, and manual switching ain't so bad, I've decided to sell off my HD500 and write the whole experience off as "an education". Needless to say, I won't venture into those waters again.



          It's clear to me that the HD500 is meant for the enthusiast, someone prepared to figure out how to extract good tone themselves, or via self-help mechanisms, like this forum. If you don't have a lot of time to play with the box, in other words, don't bother: there are no quick fixes. And I so mean a LOT of time - The HD500 has a very steep learning curve, with Line6 roadblocks and idiosyncrasies all the way on your journey.



          Is my negative experience due to the fact that I did not have a complete Dream Rig? Does the JTV + HD500 + DT eliminate inconsistencies? Does going the whole hog make it easier to get results? I was hoping that Craig Anderton would give us some insight on the entire system, taken as a whole, rather than bits and pieces, but I guess this thread went in a different direction. Anyway, I'm throwing in the towel on the HD500, am putting it on Craigslist tonight, but I'm keeping the JTV.



          Some negative observations:



          - No support for the Relay digital wireless system. Being tethered to a VDI cable is plain dumb, considering that Line6 has the best digital wireless system for guitars out there.



          - At best very rudimentary MIDI controls & functions. Unless you just want to do very simple on/off program switching, the 500HD is next to useless. I wanted to use it for controlling my pair of Mesa's (via their 1/4 inch control circuits). Even with the right MIDI to 1/4 inch box, the HD500's MIDI implementation is rudimentary, to say the least!



          - I know might get flack for saying this, but my JTV-69 sounds WAAAAY better through a conventional pedal board or simply direct into any of my amplifiers, than it does through the HD500. I cannot put my finger on it exactly, but I can dial in my steam-age pedal board and get good tone immediately - something that is not easy tp achieve, on the fly, with the 500HD. To dial-in a tone on the HD500 takes an evening of preparation, study, finessing and a lot of fiddling. And if you happen to keep your main rig at a practice space, like I do, there are no guarantees that when you try the "production" patch, that it is going to sound right. I suppose if you use one of the DT series amps, the tone may be more consistent, but I want a real amplifier, not a toy.



          - Lack of SS (e.g. Jazz) amplifier models. Why is that? A solid-state amp should be dead easy to simulate for a company like Line 6. This is not a major beef of mine, but it is irritating that I had to invent workarounds.



          - The HD500 VOX AC30 simulation just plain sucks, sounding nothing remotely like a real AC. I've owned several AC's. Ditto for the Fender amplifiers, IMO. I tried to get a nice, fat clean Fender Twin sound - the only way was to plug the JTV into the real thing, which kinda defeats the object. I ended up dropping the amp simulations altogether.



          - Support from the distributor in Canada is next to nonexistent. Everything is on back-order basis, and it takes weeks, maybe months, for something as straightforward as a VDI cable.



          - Lack of a gig-proof case. Anyone who gigs regularly will know what I'm talking about: I eventually mounted my 500HD directly on a Pedaltrain 2. The Pedaltrain raised the HD500 above the "beer puddle" level, an important consideration, and mine came with a decent hard case.



          - Line 6 takes product secrecy to extreme lengths. In fact, they give new meaning to "mushroom mentality" - feed 'em sh1t and keep 'em in the dark! And we are the mushrooms ... I have never had to deal with a stranger bunch than these guys.



          Some positive observations:



          - Control of JTV tuning and model modes by footpedal on the HD500 really works. Unfortunately, it works only via the VDI cable.



          - For me, saving tempo per song in the setlists is a nice feature, especially when the guitar opens the song and the drummer is not around/not sober/being ornery. I just watched the blinking tap tempo light on the HD500, which you can preset for every song in a setlist.



          - Stereo implementation is good. Having tried to run a stereo path on a conventional pedal board, I'd say that if you want to run in stereo, the HD500 makes the impossible possible in this respect.



          - The HD editing software is nice, easy to follow, intuitive. Full marks to Line6 on the interface, and update (Monkey) procedure.

          Comment


          • No support for the Relay digital wireless system. Being tethered to a VDI cable is plain dumb, considering that Line6 has the best digital wireless system for guitars out there.



            I can't speak to the rest of your points ... but in order to work with any wireless system you would need one that works in two directions. While we also wish it could, Relay of course only works in one.
            Don Boomer

            Comment








            • Quote Originally Posted by LarryLion
              View Post

              My patience has worn thin with the so-called "Dream Rig". I'm writing this in the hope that I can save someone some anguish.



              It's clear to me that the HD500 is meant for the enthusiast, someone prepared to figure out how to extract good tone themselves, or via self-help mechanisms, like this forum. If you don't have a lot of time to play with the box, in other words, don't bother: there are no quick fixes. And I so mean a LOT of time - The HD500 has a very steep learning curve, with Line6 roadblocks and idiosyncrasies all the way on your journey.




              Actually I think this comment is worthy of a discussion. I’ve covered a couple songs from a friend of mine over in the UK who is an excellent songwriter and musician, and works primarily with an all-in-one recorder. He's decided he wants to start using a DAW, so he downloaded a trial version. I will be very surprised if he does not end up throwing his computer against the wall within 24 hours.



              The HD500 is definitely a top-of-the-line model for hardcore electronically-oriented guitarists, and IMHO there's a need for that type of product. I find I can pretty much get whatever sound I want with it, and paradoxically, many of them use only a fraction of the total capabilities. I've gotten some great sounds with just an amp and filter.



              But there is a definite gap forming between those who were raised with digital devices and computers (and I don't mean raised in the sense of date of birth, but in the sense of starting with early, and simple, digital devices). My friend is having to enter this strange world of latency, interfaces, ports, and all kinds of other things that never concerned him before. That's also the case with a lot of advanced products. Having started with the very first POD, it's like I started in kindergarten, went through other generations of devices, and now with the HD500, I'm in college. But for someone who hasn't been through the classes on algebra, calculus is going to be a rough road



              I've written a lot of articles to try and educate users about how to use these new devices, but unfortunately, they're spread over a variety of magazines and web sites, over a variety of years. There's no "serial" way to go through them, but organizing and revising them to form a cohesive collection is something I really need to do.








              Is my negative experience due to the fact that I did not have a complete Dream Rig? Does the JTV + HD500 + DT eliminate inconsistencies? Does going the whole hog make it easier to get results? I was hoping that Craig Anderton would give us some insight on the entire system, taken as a whole, rather than bits and pieces, but I guess this thread went in a different direction.



              Well I'm finally downloading the latest JTV and DT updates tonight. I hate to make excuses, because this thread is near and dear to what I love to do. Without going into too much detail, I have had to deal with urgent health issues in both my immediate family and with a crucial business associate. I can handle one or two emergencies at any given time, but four is really pushing my limits. Furthermore, the HC forums "broke" in September and were only stabilized within the past week or two. There were times where I wanted to add material to this thread, and I couldn't even access the forum. Fortunately, pro reviews have no time limit, so I can pick up where I left off...but still, it's been rough. At this point, I want to hang out in this thread for therapy if nothing else








              Some negative observations:



              - No support for the Relay digital wireless system. Being tethered to a VDI cable is plain dumb, considering that Line6 has the best digital wireless system for guitars out there.



              That's already been answered, but it's not due to lack of interest on Line 6's part, it's due to lack of technology.








              At best very rudimentary MIDI controls & functions. Unless you just want to do very simple on/off program switching, the 500HD is next to useless. I wanted to use it for controlling my pair of Mesa's (via their 1/4 inch control circuits). Even with the right MIDI to 1/4 inch box, the HD500's MIDI implementation is rudimentary, to say the least!



              I'm not familiar with what type of control the Mesa amps need, but you can build program change, CC, and other controls into a patch and send them with footswitches and the pedals. Appendix B in the full manual goes into quite a bit of detail. In terms of incoming control, the HD500 accepts MIDI to do whatever it is you would normally do with the footswitches and pedals. The main use for this is for live use where signals come in and take control so the performers don't have to worry about stepping on the right switch at the right time. The first time I saw this in action was at a Shania Twain concert where several players used Line 6 gear (including a Variax or two, IIRC) and patches and parameters changed while they just kept playing along. I'm not quite sure what you were expecting, but the HD500 offers quite a bit of MIDI control options.








              I know might get flack for saying this, but my JTV-69 sounds WAAAAY better through a conventional pedal board or simply direct into any of my amplifiers, than it does through the HD500. I cannot put my finger on it exactly, but I can dial in my steam-age pedal board and get good tone immediately - something that is not easy tp achieve, on the fly, with the 500HD. To dial-in a tone on the HD500 takes an evening of preparation, study, finessing and a lot of fiddling.



              Actually this is something where in one way, I agree. For live use, I spend a lot of time getting the sound right "offline" and then just call up the sounds when I play. A "steam-age" pedalboard hasn't disappeared because it does have its advantages - if there's something you don't like about, say, the distortion you have three or maybe four knobs max to tweak and they will all be strategically-important parameters. You don't have to go through menus or chase down parameters.



              But, the reason why I use digital devices live is specifically because I can continuously refine the sounds, and more importantly, they're remembered so I can recall them at the touch of a switch.



              Of course, the tonal quality you get out of a pedalboard may be more to your liking - as a guitar-playing friend of mine (and an awesome player!!) in Nashville once said to me when we were talking about high-tech guitar processors, "I have a Tube Screamer and a Memory Man. What else do a I need?" And really, he didn't anything else. On the other hand, I play with a lot of electronica-type situations (I am, after all, the world's oldest living techno guitarist...or perhaps the world's ONLY living techno guitarist) and the HD500 gives me sounds I can't get otherwise. For many years my only live effect was an AdrenaLinn, so that should tell you something about my orientation and why something like the HD500 appeals to me so much.





              (continued next post)
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              • *






                Quote Originally Posted by LarryLion
                View Post

                And if you happen to keep your main rig at a practice space, like I do, there are no guarantees that when you try the "production" patch, that it is going to sound right. I suppose if you use one of the DT series amps, the tone may be more consistent, but I want a real amplifier, not a toy.




                The DT is not a toy, that's for sure. It's not based on the same philosophy as a Marshall stack, of course, but it's a serious amp. I've stopped using any of my other amps because the DT gives the me sound I want for any recording situation. For live, I don't use guitar amps because I get the sound I want in the processors, and run into the PA...but that's a whole other story.



                As to the dichotomy of patches sounding right in rehearsal vs. on a gig, that's a situation where I've learned that simpler is better. There's no reverb on ANY patch I use live; and with chorusing, the dry signal will be at 60-70% instead of the 50-50% I'd use in the studio. Certain frequencies can really grate live, like around 3.5kHz, and I keep those to a minimum. At this point, I can create patches at home and be confident they'll sound good in a venue...but it took me a while to figure out how to make that happen. Hmmm, sounds like a good idea for an article...








                Lack of SS (e.g. Jazz) amplifier models. Why is that? A solid-state amp should be dead easy to simulate for a company like Line 6. This is not a major beef of mine, but it is irritating that I had to invent workarounds.



                I have plenty of clean sounds that work for me, but often, they don't involve using an amp model.








                The HD500 VOX AC30 simulation just plain sucks, sounding nothing remotely like a real AC. I've owned several AC's. Ditto for the Fender amplifiers, IMO. I tried to get a nice, fat clean Fender Twin sound - the only way was to plug the JTV into the real thing, which kinda defeats the object. I ended up dropping the amp simulations altogether.



                Again, this is a more subjective element. I must admit I don't concern myself too much with whether something sounds like a particular amp or not, I'm mostly building sounds from scratch that please me. If they end up sounding like a Fender, then I assure you, it's solely by accident I will say that having used multiple amp sims, some are stronger in some areas than others. If you compare the AC30 sound in POD Farm, GTR, AmpliTube, and Guitar Rig, you'll find significant differences. One company might nail high-gain sounds, another bluesy ones, and so on...to “move beyond the defaults” requires tweaking sounds to fit better what you want to hear, and as you've noted, that's a learning curve all its own. It took me years of working with computer-based amp sims before I finally figured out that putting a de-esser and EQ with a 2K notch in front of the amp, and a parametric afterward with a strategically-tuned steep notch, pretty much solved any problems I had with the sound








                Lack of a gig-proof case. Anyone who gigs regularly will know what I'm talking about: I eventually mounted my 500HD directly on a Pedaltrain 2. The Pedaltrain raised the HD500 above the "beer puddle" level, an important consideration, and mine came with a decent hard case.



                I've found it necessary to fashion custom cases for just about anything, so I wouldn't attribute this as solely an HD500 issue.








                Line 6 takes product secrecy to extreme lengths. In fact, they give new meaning to "mushroom mentality" - feed 'em sh1t and keep 'em in the dark! And we are the mushrooms ... I have never had to deal with a stranger bunch than these guys.



                Not sure what you mean...when I've had questions, I've gotten answers from the forums or FAQs.








                Some positive observations:



                - Control of JTV tuning and model modes by footpedal on the HD500 really works. Unfortunately, it works only via the VDI cable.



                I think that's to be expected, as you have to have a communications link that's optimized for digital data.








                For me, saving tempo per song in the setlists is a nice feature, especially when the guitar opens the song and the drummer is not around/not sober/being ornery.



                Hey, I've worked with that drummer too!!








                I just watched the blinking tap tempo light on the HD500, which you can preset for every song in a setlist.



                Agreed, this is very handy.








                Stereo implementation is good. Having tried to run a stereo path on a conventional pedal board, I'd say that if you want to run in stereo, the HD500 makes the impossible possible in this respect.



                Also agreed, but I don't use stereo live, only in the studio.








                The HD editing software is nice, easy to follow, intuitive. Full marks to Line6 on the interface, and update (Monkey) procedure.



                Which reminds me...time to get back to the music computer and finish the update.



                I commend the overall thoughtfulness of your post instead of just ranting...I have the feeling that if I could sit down with you for a weekend, you wouldn't sell the HD500. But, we also need to be realistic and if something is overkill for your needs, then there's nothing wrong with wanting a simpler, more streamlined way to get what you want. I don't find the HD500 to be the easiest piece of gear in the world to learn simply because it does have so many options, but once you get the hang of the operating system, it's internally consistent and eventually sort of falls in place all at once. Again, though, just the concept of having a guitar box with an "operating system" will be off-putting to some (not necessarily you, I mean more the “tubes and Tele” player who’s fine with what they have).



                Anyway, back to the review. The forums are working, and so far, I’m not in a hospital yet!!
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                • Boomer



                  The technology exists - wifi, wireless LAN have been around for years









                  Quote Originally Posted by dboomer
                  View Post

                  No support for the Relay digital wireless system. Being tethered to a VDI cable is plain dumb, considering that Line6 has the best digital wireless system for guitars out there.



                  I can't speak to the rest of your points ... but in order to work with any wireless system you would need one that works in two directions. While we also wish it could, Relay of course only works in one.




                  Comment








                  • Quote Originally Posted by LarryLion
                    View Post

                    Boomer



                    The technology exists - wifi, wireless LAN have been around for years




                    Yes, but I think what he's saying is that the Relay system does not use that technology, so it can't just be ported over...I'm assuming it would require a considerable amount of development that the company doesn't feel would be cost-effective, or might feel there wouldn't be sufficient demand to justify.



                    I'm intrigued by the spate of new products that use wi-fi like the Mackie DL1608, but they use existing devices (e.g., iPad and Airport wireless router). I don't know about the internal nuts and bolts, but I would imagine that developing a wireless system from scratch to handle the DVI data would not be trivial.
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                    • Craig, Boomer



                      I guess I need to explain further. I realize that the Relay system is currently one-way. The stream on the VDI cable is asynchronous, with the Guitar->Pod stream probably comparable to the Relay. From a systems engineering point of view, Line 6 has all the technology blocks needed to implement an asynchronous, wireless control system between the HD500 and the JTV, but they chose not to, could be for all sorts of legitimate reasons. Maybe it is in the works, maybe not, but is the technology available? Definitely.



                      I really like being wireless. If that one capability was available on the HD500/JTV,it still would not have stopped me from selling my HD500 - which, by the way, folks, sold in less than 30 minutes yesterday, and I got back most of my cash outlay. Fortunately, Line 6 stuff keeps its value.



                      Craig, thanks for your response. I suppose it is a credit to Line 6 that their JTV, alone, is still a very well thought out piece of kit, and works very well WITHOUT the HD500. Some day I will post some of my clips here, sans HD500, and you can judge for yourself.



                      And, by the way, I am now wireless with the JTV, using my Relay 50 again via the 1/4 socket. Dunno if you've reviewed the Relay 50, Craig, but that is a uniquely brilliant bit of engineering. In one step, Line 6 turned the wireless guitar world on its ear with that.



                      Cheers!

                      Comment








                      • Quote Originally Posted by LarryLion
                        View Post

                        I really like being wireless. If that one capability was available on the HD500/JTV, it still would not have stopped me from selling my HD500 - which, by the way, folks, sold in less than 30 minutes yesterday, and I got back most of my cash outlay. Fortunately, Line 6 stuff keeps its value.




                        Glad to hear that! It also supports my point that there is a substantial group of people for the whom something like the HD500 is indeed a "dream rig."








                        Craig, thanks for your response. I suppose it is a credit to Line 6 that their JTV, alone, is still a very well thought out piece of kit, and works very well WITHOUT the HD500. Some day I will post some of my clips here, sans HD500, and you can judge for yourself.



                        I'm sure they'll sound fine. I even use the JTV's stock mag pickups, without any of the models, quite a lot. They have a great sound.








                        And, by the way, I am now wireless with the JTV, using my Relay 50 again via the 1/4 socket. Dunno if you've reviewed the Relay 50, Craig, but that is a uniquely brilliant bit of engineering. In one step, Line 6 turned the wireless guitar world on its ear with that.



                        I have not reviewed the Relay 50, but I did review the XD-V70 wireless and frankly, it blew me away. It wasn't just the reliability/distance of the system, but also, the mic modeling aspect is very clever - although I tended to use the "Line 6" model the most.



                        I must say that in a way, your post was inspirational. It's not just the HD500, but DAWs, synths, interfaces, you name it...so much of today's products do have a learning curve, or at least have one if you want to exploit a device to the fullest. In my articles and videos, I really need to zero in more on scaling that learning curve instead of focusing mostly on advanced techniques once you've already climbed that curve. I appreciate the reminder.



                        [P.S - if you look at my sig, all the tunes that are referenced use the JTV ]
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                        • Quote Originally Posted by LarryLion
                          View Post

                          Line 6 has all the technology blocks needed to implement an asynchronous, wireless control system between the HD500 and the JTV, but they chose not to, could be for all sorts of legitimate reasons.




                          Could we do it?



                          Certainly ... but the cost factor is usually what decides these things. Basically using our current technology it would require a second wireless system and then both of those systems would need to me modified to transmit both data as well as the audio data. And that would require a more expensive set of electronics. Now couple that with the much smaller subset of total Relay users that would also be Dream Rig users and you probably add somewhere north of $1k to get it.



                          That's not to say that it will always be this way
                          Don Boomer

                          Comment


                          • Back in action - I 've finished all the updates, including to the HD500, Variax, Workbench and Editor, and - the piece de resistance - the DT25 2.0 firmware update.



                            Now, I must admit it's freakish to connect a couple MIDI cables from an interface to a guitar amp, then drive that data with a firmware update being spit out by a program being tickled by Line 6's servers. We've come a long way since "updating" a tube amp meant pulling out the tube, taking to a drugstore tube tester (these actually existed), finding out it needed to be replaced, and inserting a new tube.



                            But the update went off without a hitch. Also worth noting: The Variax updated much faster than last time.



                            Anyway, the overview is that the 2.0 update provides access to internal parameters via MIDI continuous controller messages. By feeding the right combination of controller number and controller value, you can change a huge variety of parameters. Some of these are global, such as channel A/B select, choosing the voicings individually for channels A and B, or choosing the XLR Direct Out emulation.



                            Others set up parameter types for the four voicings. So for example, if you prefer that channel A voicing II position was a Line 6 Epic amp model type, with the voicing switch in that position you'd send a controller 11 message with a data value of 30. If you instead wanted the Brit J-800 model, you'd send a data value of 20.



                            If you sent those same controller values with MIDI continuous controller 12, then you would again choose the HD amp model, but also the default cab, tube configuration, power class, and other parameter settings that pertained to the current voicing position.



                            You can also select cabs via MIDI, as well as control all the knobs and specify the topology, amp operating class, reverb parameters, and a whole lot more.



                            As to how you control all these parameters, basically any kind of control surface where you can configure the MIDI data will work. (I created a complete POD programmer with a Panasonic DA7 mixer a decade ago...ah, those were the days.) But, you can also use the MIDI controller capabilities available in the HD500 or POD HD Pro, or if you have a suitable Apple iOS device (iPad, iPod touch, iPhone) and Line 6's MIDI Mobilizer, do your control from the iOS device.
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                            • So that's all pretty tweaky stuff, right? I used Sonar going through a V-Studio interface to control the DT25 parameters, and that's not something I'd lug around on stage. But, I see three major reasons for the update.



                              Custom shop for the DT25. I think this is probably how most DT25 owners will take advantage of the update. When you change a parameter, it's remembered until you reset the amp or overwrite the existing data. So, you can play around with configuring the amp for a particular set of sounds, and now the DT25 becomes YOUR amp, containing the sounds YOU want. I created a little sequence in Sonar that sent controller messages for a particular voicing, and there's no reason why you couldn't create a collection of these...blast one set into the amp before the hard rock gig, and another for sitting in with a jazz band at the local restaurant.



                              DAW integration. Although you've been able to control effects and sims using automation, controlling an actual tube amp via automation to this detailed a level is something I've never done before (and I'm not sure it was possible prior to the DT25, other than basics like channel switching). So, you can mic your amp to get the "miked amp" sound, but send controller messages to configure it on the fly as you play. This avoids punching in a part with a different setting, or flicking switches just before you want to change the sound. Granted, it takes some tweaking to create exactly the sounds you want to use, but it may take less time to do that and do your part in one take instead of overdubbing or punching a part, and stopping every time you want to change the sound.



                              Live performance. For bands that sync to a sequencer and have a highly programmed set, a player could have all changes happen automatically, without having to hit a footswitch or turn a control (like the Shania Twain concert I referenced earlier). Personally, to me that's not what live performance is about...but still, I'd find it handy to be able to have the amp settings change from one song to the next via somebody sending the appropriate control signals.



                              I'm assuming this also gives more options when using the L6 link, as the HD500 can call up a wider selection of amp types. But, we'll find that out next as we delve into L6-land with the HD500 and DT25.



                              I must say that the idea of frequent, free updates that add a lot of capabilities appeals to me. The other updates I did were relatively minor compared to the DT25 firmware change that allowed so much extra control and configurability, but still, it's good to know Line 6 is paying attention to improving their products on a pretty regular basis.
                              CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

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                              • Thanks for the thread! I just completed my dream rig last week, HD500, DT50 and JTV59. I've had the HD500 for a little over a month and I'm still trying to come to grips with it. This thread has been helpful and I'm looking forward to more tips and info.

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