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  • Thanks, Craig. Splits work just fine. Later, Ray

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    • New P1.



      I forwarded this thread in my mail to my dealer (Soundfactory).

      They managed to get me a new P1. This is amazing. I can't wait to get the new one.



      Thanks everybody who helped in this matter !



      ps : I won't be updating firmware anymore, until I know its save. And no, I did not

      make an error. (iMac is up2date, usb-cable was new, both devices connected safely

      on the same desk).

      As a computerspecialist (Engineer) I find it really dangerous to first 'Erase' the

      firmware and then save the new one. If anything goes wrong in this process

      you're stuck with a dead machine because there is no means to restore to the

      previous firmware. Without firmware the update can not be initiated.

      (Old firmware gone, new one not complete.)

      Maybe something to think about. A Plan-B with an auto-restore from a SD card

      of build-in ROM would be nice to have. I'm afraid these accidents will happen quite

      often with this method of update.

      Comment








      • Quote Originally Posted by Paulogic
        View Post

        New P1.



        I forwarded this thread in my mail to my dealer (Soundfactory).

        They managed to get me a new P1. This is amazing. I can't wait to get the new one.




        I'm glad they're willing to stand behind the product. Also, you have now witnessed the power of the pro review



        I've done LOTS of firmware updates over the years. Some are "if this doesn't work you're dead," others are more forgiving. In the Line 6 Dream Rig pro review, an update failed on the Variax and I thought I was screwed...it wouldn't play at all. But, I was able to try again, and it worked the second time. Also, they have a Rollback button that goes back to a previous firmware version, which I think is a very good idea.
        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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        • I had a similar experience "updating" my XW-P1, and the board stopped the "update" at 8. Thereafter it died. Mike Martin came to the rescue, and I exchanged the dead board for another that worked. Casio stood behind the product. Great customer service. Although I was told that Casio in Japan could not duplicate my problem, I am not "updating" this one, pending word and assurances from Casio that it is safe.

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          • hi and thanks for this informative thread....I have the G1 and been enjoying it quite a bit.



            I know you said you r going to Hex next but I hope eventually you get to address some of step seq stuff on the G1. I'd really like to learn about using the faders to change various values (and stuff like open/closed hihats) with onboard tones/arpeggios. I've gotten lucky and landed on the right combination sometimes, but not always. and I'm sure there are perimeters beyond what's covered in the manual....



            thanks

            TM
            the more you love music,
            the more music you love

            Comment








            • Quote Originally Posted by moontom
              View Post

              hi and thanks for this informative thread....I have the G1 and been enjoying it quite a bit.



              I know you said your going to Hex next but I hope eventually you get to address some of step seq stuff on the G1. I'd really like to learn about using the faders to change various values (and stuff like open/closed hihats) with onboard tones/arpeggios. I've gotten lucky and landed on the right combination sometimes, but not always. and I'm sure there are perimeters beyond what's covered in the manual....




              I don't have the G1 set up yet, but this should hold you over - it's about using the P1 step sequencer, including using the faders and track on/off buttons.



              I decided that rather than deal with simply editing a step sequence, I’d create my own from scratch. Overall, it was quite easy—and many button presses later, I had a fun little sequence. The attached audio example is just a single pattern, but with my bringing parts in and out using the step sequencer buttons, and also, changing track volume while it’s playing, I ending up with something more interesting than just pressing “Play” and letting things loop ad infinitum.




              There was an “uh-oh” moment today, followed by a “doh!” moment, when I turned on the XW-P1—the sequencer was gone! Well actually, it wasn’t. I had stored it in pattern 8, and when the unit turns on, it defaults to pattern 1 in a step sequence (which didn’t have anything in it).




              I was happy to see that there’s swing for each track (although no global swing). For me, a step sequencer without swing is of limited use...even just a setting of 55% can add a lot of life to a sequence.




              Another useful feature is that while you’re limited to 16 steps, each step can have a rhythmic value from a quarter note to a 32nd note, with triplets in between, and this is independent for each track. Therefore, even with a one-measure pattern using 16th notes, one track could have variations occurring over two measures if its resolution is set to eighth notes, or over eight measures with whole notes.




              There are nine tracks, and after selecting a track, you can enter notes in that track by turning on the 16 buttons that represent sequence steps; each tracks appears to default to a particular sound (e.g., kick drum for track 8) but you can shift the note, change the program assigned to that track, or enter notes by playing them in real time from the keyboard. Playing a note basically “deposits” it on a particular step, so you can then turn it on or off using the switches. One technique is simply to play a bunch of notes, then turn off the ones you don’t like




              The sliders are also handy as you can use them to modify velocity for a given step, and the sequence remembers this. So for example you could lay down a 16th-note high-hat part, turn off the notes you don’t want, and change the velocity for the notes that you keep to add dynamics. Not all sounds have multiple velocity layers; with the kick it seems your choices are loud, not so loud, and off. Still, it’s possible to create far more dynamic patterns than with step sequencers that play everything at the same velocity.




              The one inconvenient aspect is that when you want to play notes into the step sequencer, you need to go into edit mode, go to Step Edit, hit Enter, then select “note” for step instead of the default of “off.” I understand why; it’s so you can play the keyboard with a specific Tone or Performance while the sequencer is playing, and therefore, they need to be separate entities. I just wish there was a more obvious way to do this, or at least, one that required fewer button presses.




              A third way to enter notes is like non-real time step entry on a sequencer—go to a step, then enter a note. The display even gives you a standard “piano roll”-type view of what’s going on in the sequence
              (hey Mike - is there some secret keypress for dumping screen shots out the USB?!?). Even if you don’t get into this mode, one very useful function is that you can enter note ties in here; this ties a note to a previous note to extend its length without retriggering it.



              Once you have your sequence, then it’s time to bop over to the Mixer page and set levels, panning, and effects. The Mixer page is also where you can manipulate the sliders to fade tracks in or out of the mix, and use the 16 sequencer track buttons as track on/off buttons to switch tracks in or out of the mix. You’ll hear both these techniques being used when you listen to the audio example.




              I think that covers the step sequencer highlights, but let me know if you want me to elaborate on any of the above.
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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              • So, I have had the P1 for 7-8 weeks now and in general I have been enjoying it as a stand alone synth but today I spent 3-4 hours programming up my bands set as we have a gig on the 9th June that I would love to use just the P1. Currently I'm using a tricked out Alesis Fusion 6HD which I kinda think the casio is quite like... almost like the "Son of Fusion" in that it has 4 synth engines, sequencer, arpeggios etc... obviously the Fusion is a little bit more involved with better synth parameters and sampling but the Casio isn't far off!



                Anyway, today I started out with our first set of 9 songs, ranging from funky retro numbers with brass and clavs and moog like solos, through to more 80's stuff with klang type sounds and in general the P1 does a pretty good job... my fellow band members remarked on the more "forward" sound and that they could 'hear' the tones better then the Fusion (Alesis aren't known for very good VCA stages).



                I did have trouble with a couple of tones though... I couldn't really get a good cheesy 'surf' Vox organ sound and a couple of our songs have PPG like klangy wavetable metallic sounds... I couldn't get those types today but I'll keep trying! (no amount of HEXing sounded right, the attack was always too slow).



                One thing I did notice, and not sure if this is a bug? Using the software programmer on an SL mac, If I created a new performance, it defaults to the first solo synth sound in layer/part 1 (can't remember the terminology) which is fine, If I then changed that sound and save the patch to my hard drive, it would revert back to the solo sound once the save went through. If I uploaded the changed performance patch to the keyboard, it would revert back to the solo synth once the synth had "saved"... the only way that I found to keep the patches I changed was to upload to the synth first, go back and change the sound again, and THEN save the performance patch to the Mac... once that was done it would always be the sound that I wanted it to be (probably not explaining this very well but away from the synth now). In general I found the programmer to be quite quirky, it's almost like you have to learn routines to get it to work the way you think it should but in my experience, this is often the way with this types of applications (cough, splutter, Chicken Systems, cough, rubbish).

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                • Quote Originally Posted by mee3d
                  View Post

                  I did have trouble with a couple of tones though... I couldn't really get a good cheesy 'surf' Vox organ sound.




                  In before Mike... ;-)



                  Try these. For cheesy organ sounds, Voxy01 is a Velveeta imitation, while Voxy02 is more of a Kraft Cheddar. Don't forget to use the mod wheel! Does one of these do it for ya?




                  As to the klangy tones, that covers a pretty wide range...do you mean like clangorous, or the more sweetly metallic, DX7-like electric pianos? If you want klang, the XW-P! does offer a Ring Modulator as part of the DSP.




                  (ComboOrgan.zip has the two patches - unzip and load with your editor.)
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                  • In our foray into step sequencing in post #275, the Mixer obviously played a huge part. As you heard if you listened to the audio example, this is a situation where once you set up the Mixer, you can do a lot of editing and variations with the sliders and buttons. But, for the initial setup, you can use the computer editor and have full control over the mixer parameters.



                    This screen shot shows parts 14, 15, and 16 from the step sequence used in post #275 (as well as the External and Master sections; we’ll be covering External soon—patience!). The scroll bar at the bottom lets you scroll through the channels, but if you have a sufficiently wide high-resolution screen or dual-monitor setup, you can stretch the window wide enough to see all channels at once.









                    Look at the channel parameters, and they’re all pretty obvious—the tone being used, coarse and fine tune, bend range, volume fader, pan, reverb and chorus send, and DSP on/off button. When you’re first setting up a step sequence, using the computer is an efficient way to set up levels and panning; you can then edit these “live” once you have the sequence patterns finalized and saved.
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                    • I thought the easiest was to explain what makes up a hex layer patch would be to create a “schematic” based on the editing software.



                      The heart of this is six mini-synthesizers (the six layers, outlined in red for clarity) which are shown stacked on top of one another. They’re identical except that layers 2, 4, and 6 have a “pitch lock” button that locks the pitch of layer 2 to layer 1, layer 4 to layer 3, and layer 6 to layer 5. So for example, if you change the coarse tuning for layer 1, layer 2 will follow along.







                      Each layer lets you specify a waveform, along with its volume and pan. There’s also coarse tune and fine tune, and an ADSR envelope for the amp function. Like the PCM tones, there’s no envelope for the filter, nor the option to select multiple filter modes; what you do have is a cutoff frequency, and filter cutoff velocity sensitivity. Each layer also has its own reverb send and chorus send controls.



                      For split and layer fans, you can set separate keyranges and velocity response for the six layers. So for example, you could split a couple layers to the left part of the keyboard to provide a bass sound, layer two more layers across the rest of the keyboard, and reserve two layers so that one plays only with velocities between, say 80 and 104 while the other plays only with velocities from 105 to 127.



                      When programming from the keyboard UI, you step through the layers you want to program with the Part +/- buttons (which are sort of the universal “let’s select one out of a series of things” buttons). Programming from the computer editor is definitely less tedious, but programming from the keyboard is not difficult, nor is the workflow obtuse—it’s not hard to figure out where you want to go.



                      Other hex layer elements are separate pitch and amp LFOs that feed all the layers simultaneously (i.e., each layer doesn’t have its own pitch and amp LFO), There are six different waveforms—nice—along with parameters for rate, LFO delay, fade in time (“auto rise”), and overall depth. There are separate depth controls for the mod wheel and aftertouch, so you can have a little bit of depth and then add to it with the wheel or aftertouch, or no depth and use only the wheel, etc. These are grouped under the ETC tab—I have no idea what that stands for, maybe Mike does.



                      There’s a final, overall control section called Common. This sets the overall volume (good for matching patch levels), and a master reverb send and chorus send. You can also enable the DSP here that applies to the entire patch.



                      The Hex Layer patches are ideal for pads, massed sounds, choirs, brass, voices, and other “big” sounds. It’s also a great way to “dress up” PCM tones—for example, use a piano for one layer, and a sine wave tuned down an octave mixed in at a low, almost subliminal, level behind the piano.



                      Remember, this is a keyboard with four “engines.” Just as the Solo Synth is for highly programmable, thick leads, the Drawbar engine for organs, the PCM tones for polyphonic “bread and butter” sounds, the Hex Layers is more for pad, ambient, and complex sounds.
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • maybe ETC means et cetera???
                        the poster formerly known as TrancedelicBlues

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                        • I received my new P1 today.

                          I will unbox it later and start enjoying again. No updates for a while



                          Thanks to everyone who helped. Also to my reseller The Soundfactory !

                          They stood behind me and the product !



                          Casio Rocks !



                          Question if I may : if using the PC editor, does it work 'life' or do we need to

                          up- and download? Can we store from the editor directly or is interaction with

                          the P1 keys necessary?



                          ETC : Extra Tone Control ??

                          Comment








                          • Quote Originally Posted by Paulogic
                            View Post

                            Question if I may: if using the PC editor, does it work 'life' or do we need do up- and download? Can we store from the editor directly or is interaction with

                            the P1 keys necessary?




                            When you change a parameter on the editor, it changes on the keyboard so the only interaction you need do with is to play the notes you want to hear.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • Hey - what do y'all think of my making the text in posts with audio examples or downloadable patches in blue, like this, so you can scan down the posts and not miss the posts with attachments?
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • Great idea. Would make it a little easier to recognize.

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