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Treble Bleed Kit , Do I have it right?

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  • Treble Bleed Kit , Do I have it right?



    This is going in a 1995 Les Paul Studio. I'm in the process of getting rid of all the fading gold hardware and putting all new black hardware in it's place.
    Also putting in a Seymour Duncan Custom SH-5 in the bridge & and a Seymour Duncan '59 in the neck so I figured I'd add a couple more things, just seeing if any of you see anything wrong with my soldering plan.

  • #2
    I went by this one when I tried it, played around with C and R values, then ripped it out. Not a fan of the treble bleed thing. It changes the taper of pots and sounds unnatural to me. I started liking the slight high end loss when the volume is rolled down and learned to work with it.

    Listen...

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, I think people often start out seeing this as kind of a one-size-fits-all thing. You're probably not only going to have to just try the bleed circuit, but also experiment with different component values (within a fairly small range), to find out if you like what it does to your tone. Rather that being "good" or "bad", this is more about what sounds good to you.

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      • #4


        It looks sorta like this in my guitar's control cavity, I'm just getting a second opinion on this.
        What throws me off is the ground plate used in the control cavity.
        $20 mod, no big deal or loss.

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        • #5
          If there's a ground plate they're probably depending on that to provide electrical grounds for the pots. That might eliminate a wire or two. Is that what's confusing?

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          • #6
            Pretty much. I gotta figure all this out, I got a friend who's a soldering perfectionist but doesn't know anything about musical instruments but he does great work.

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            • #7
              I went by this one when I tried it, played around with C and R values, then ripped it out. Not a fan of the treble bleed thing. It changes the taper of pots and sounds unnatural to me. I started liking the slight high end loss when the volume is rolled down and learned to work with it.



              Well,that parallel 100k resistor will screw everything up so that's normal.

              I'm pretty sure the resistor was supposed to be in series with the cap, with the whole thing being paralleled. Then the guy read it wrong when he did the drawing.

              Personnally, I just put a simple 500P silver mica I had left from an amp built between the top lug (where the pickup's hot wire connects) and the wiper. I only have it on my neck pickup and I could never live without it! I don't have a clean channel on my amp (JCM800 clone) so I need to lower the guitar's volume for clean and the LP's neck pickup just sounds too fat to work. With the treble cap I can get Strat-ish clean tone then go easily to fat liquid lead tone.
              Just one 0.10$ part, no resistor to screw things up!
              What is this sorcery?

              Comment


              • #8
                If you have a buddy who's into electronics you might ask him to help you "bread board" something up without doing any actual soldering. Or just leave the component leads full length so you can tack solder stuff in place, and pull it out easily. Just let the stuff hang out of the cavity while you're experimenting. That way you can try various configurations and component values to see how your tone will change. As noted above most bleed circuits don't use the resistor, just the cap.

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                • #9
                  Well,that parallel 100k resistor will screw everything up so that's normal.

                  I'm pretty sure the resistor was supposed to be in series with the cap, with the whole thing being paralleled. Then the guy read it wrong when he did the drawing.

                  Personnally, I just put a simple 500P silver mica I had left from an amp built between the top lug (where the pickup's hot wire connects) and the wiper. I only have it on my neck pickup and I could never live without it! I don't have a clean channel on my amp (JCM800 clone) so I need to lower the guitar's volume for clean and the LP's neck pickup just sounds too fat to work. With the treble cap I can get Strat-ish clean tone then go easily to fat liquid lead tone.
                  Just one 0.10$ part, no resistor to screw things up!


                  I tried series, parallel, and a few different combinations of values. Never found one I like, but I mostly play clean so the weird frequency play added by the bleed was very obvious. The bleed cap just seemed to add the high frequencies that I don't want in the signal anyway, and no configuration I tried seemed well balanced as the V knob was turned. So I never found one I liked but that doesn't mean it isn't the right fix for somebody else. Moral is try a bunch of different things before settling on one, or deciding you don't like the mod. Alligator clips, or some other way for a quick connect, will speed up the trial period as well.
                  Listen...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I went with the initial diagram and everything is in and sounds great.

                    We left a bit length to the treble bleeds so I could just cut it out if they were not producing a desired effect but all seems well.

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