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Hey Phil - Ever Record the Acoustic Output of an Electric and Mix It In?

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  • Hey Phil - Ever Record the Acoustic Output of an Electric and Mix It In?

    I ask because I got to play a Gibson ES Les Paul yesterday, and the sound from the guitar itself without an amp was pretty tasty - not an acoustic, not an electric. I'm seriously considering going to the "Gibson Lending Library" to evaluate the recorded sound of the guitar itself, but thought maybe this was the kind of thing you might have tried in the past, given that you're not on the normal side of normal
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  • #2
    I've done that before with a stratocaster. It really picks up the sound of the pick slapping the strings and, in the proper context, can give the guitar parts a nice acoustic flavour.

    I seem to recall hearing somewhere that they used to mic Buddy Holly's strat on some of those old records.


    you can't control the wind but you can learn to sail

    contentment is true wealth

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    • #3
      Gibson ES Les Paul - is that a carved out mahogany body with a maple cap or is it constructed more like a 335?


      you can't control the wind but you can learn to sail

      contentment is true wealth

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with onelife. Depending on the mic position what could be picked up will likely be mostly string slap, string squeal, and pick noise micing.

        You probably feel the tone more when you play it then you actually hear it. If you had a contact mic of decent quality or a piezo bridge you'd likely get much better results. Maybe you could blend what you do get with the pickups. I have done that many times before to get some extra string slap playing rhythm parts, usually from an open vocal mic. It helps if the room has some reflection too.

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        • #5
          I tried it (Shure sm58 setup I use for my vocals at about 8 in from the body) and it doesn't sound anything like it 'sounds'. The recording is far thinner and reedier than what the ear gets.
          Short of a degree in the Psychology of Hearing I am stumped on why there is such a huge difference, especially as my ears are if anything further away than the mike
          Less is more

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          • #6
            ^^^^ Maybe it has something to do with our binaural hearing - it would be interesting to hear it recorded in stereo.

            In order to get a musical (subjective) sound I had to blend sound of the mic with the sound of the magnetic pickups.


            you can't control the wind but you can learn to sail

            contentment is true wealth

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Anderton View Post
              I ask because I got to play a Gibson ES Les Paul yesterday, and the sound from the guitar itself without an amp was pretty tasty - not an acoustic, not an electric. I'm seriously considering going to the "Gibson Lending Library" to evaluate the recorded sound of the guitar itself, but thought maybe this was the kind of thing you might have tried in the past, given that you're not on the normal side of normal
              Sure... it can give the part a kind of ghostly quality, a little something extra that can be interesting in some circumstances. I like to do it with my Casino, which as you know is a thinline hollowbody, but I've done it with solidbodies too. The ES Les Paul is a semi-hollowbody IIRC; more like a 335, so I imagine that would work quite well.

              I'm not quite sure how to take your "not on the normal side of normal" comment.
              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chordite View Post
                I tried it (Shure sm58 setup I use for my vocals at about 8 in from the body) and it doesn't sound anything like it 'sounds'. The recording is far thinner and reedier than what the ear gets.
                Short of a degree in the Psychology of Hearing I am stumped on why there is such a huge difference, especially as my ears are if anything further away than the mike
                Because your ears are further away than the mic is, you're getting a different perspective than the mic is. Have you tried variations on your mic positioning? Maybe consider trying a highly sensitive condenser instead of a dynamic?
                **********

                "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                - George Carlin

                "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by onelife View Post
                  Gibson ES Les Paul - is that a carved out mahogany body with a maple cap or is it constructed more like a 335?
                  Laminated maple top, back and sides (similar to my Casino, as well as the ES-335) with a solid mahogany center block. IIRC, the ES-335 has a solid maple center block. Casinos and 335's also have somewhat larger bodies.

                  http://www2.gibson.com/Products/Elec...-Les-Paul.aspx
                  **********

                  "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                  - George Carlin

                  "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                  - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                  "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                  - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have an ES-137 which is similar to a 335 except the centre block is mahogany and only goes from the neck joint to under the tailpiece. I like to think of it as a Les Paul stuck inside a 175.

                    It would seem from your description that the ES Les Paul is like a smaller version of the 137.
                    Last edited by onelife; 08-22-2014, 06:24 PM.


                    you can't control the wind but you can learn to sail

                    contentment is true wealth

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sounds like there are some definite similarities between the ES Les Paul and ES-137, but Craig would definitely know more than I do on that. I do like that Gibson is now offering some hollow and semi-hollowbody models with smaller body dimensions. I would think they'd be fairly popular with smaller players. That was one of the reasons I stayed away from Casinos and 335's for so long - I'm 5'8", and their large bodies look enormous compared to my size. Then I got older, started playing live a lot less, so now, who cares if I look dorky holding a big bodied guitar?
                      Last edited by Phil O'Keefe; 08-26-2014, 11:46 AM.
                      **********

                      "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                      - George Carlin

                      "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                      - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                      "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                      - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                      Comment



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