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Zoom MRT-3B drum machine initializes on startup every time. Can't save anything!

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  • #16
    Useful indeed! Thanks for that terrific first post - don't be a stranger! philthumb
    **********

    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

    - George Carlin

    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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    • #17
      Thanks Nick782,

      That's what I was thinking. The internal battery was dead and failed to hold the saved info.
      MY QUESTION IS: How do you maintain all your saved patterns etc while changing the internal CR2032 ?
      Will having it turned on either by plugging it in or by the AA batteries save your programmed stuff while changing the internal memory battery?
      Anybody have any experience with this? I want to change the internal batt in my RT-223. It's about 6 years old now and still holding my stored patterns.
      thanks rico

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      • #18
        If there's a way to save and offload your patterns (MIDI dump, etc.) then that's what I'd recommend you do first, before changing the backup battery. Then just reload them once you finish doing the battery swap.
        **********

        "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

        - George Carlin

        "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

        - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

        "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

        - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

        Comment


        • #19
          NIck 782, you take-it-apart-and-fix-it-yourself genius, you rock! Thank you so much for the good info.

          Since I last posted, I went ahead and bought a used Zoom RT-223 for $50 on eBay. Am using that now (but not the kind of cheesy-sounding bass functionality).

          But I still have the old MRT-3B and I like some of the drum patches on there better than the new one. Maybe I'll take it apart and attempt the mod you describe.
          In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. But in practice, there is.

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          • #20
            "Hey guys -

            There is hope. The Zoom MRT3 (B for Black) absolutely has an internal battery back up for User patterns, songs etc. I just changed my battery out last week after having the same exact "Init?" code and all same problems described in this forum.

            However - you need to take out BOTH PC boards in order to get to it. The battery is on the PC board closest to the pad buttons - which is under the 2nd PC board and furthest away from you when the unit is upside down after removing the back cover. The battery is a standard CR2032 which is available at most drug stores or Radio Shack for $5- $6. The battery is typically soldered or tack welded to clips holding the terminals to the PC board. You can either try to "unsolder" the clips from the battery and install a new battery. Just be careful not overheat when trying to remove!

            Or you can do what I did which was- simply buy a replacement battery holder from Radio Shack ($1.50), remove the old clips (2 solder joints) and solder the new battery holder onto the PC board (2 solder joints). Then you can easily swap out batteries in the future if the need ever arises again. I bought my MRT3B new and used it for about 10 years before the battery needed to be changed.

            http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=3060977

            Done. Piece of cake and works great. One small snag is that when the new battery holder was soldered in, it hung off the PC board a little bit and rubbed against one of the ribs on the plastic frame/body inside the MRT3. I simply shaved down the plastic rib with a razor knife to make a little room. Now it fits and works great.

            This may be my first Forum post ever? Figured, I actually had something useful to contribute. Good luck "
            --------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Just in case anyone else has this problem and the thread is still relevant, I will add my 2 cents worth.
            The short is, I have done the repair and so far (1 hour) it is able to retain its memory for at least a 15 minute duration while turned off.

            Couple things I'd suggest:

            - There are small wire springs (sort of) that are under the top 2 screws. Notice there position.
            - The knob on the front that controls volume needs to be removed by pulling straight outward with pliers. This is part of what holds the board in when it feels like it should come out.
            - There are 2 small screws beside the MIDI insert that need to be removed.
            - The top board has all the inserts attached to it so you need to wiggle and kind of contort the plastic box in order to remove it.
            - I ended up un-soldering the battery holders from the board and then using sidecutters, remove the metal tabs from the old battery.
            I then tried to shape them back to their original shape (metal seems forgiving for being bent) and soldered them into their original holes on the board.
            -Take note of the polarity and put the holders in their correct holes

            This is where my fix may fail. I used electrical tape and simply wedged the battery between the clips and wrapped it. Not sure if the connection has enough "squeeze" on the battery and the longevity of the tape is also questionable. I don't feel soldering to the battery is an option

            That's all I can think of other then be quick on the soldering so the board doesn't get too hot.

            Thanks to Nick782 for his inspiration
            Last edited by Phil O'Keefe; 03-21-2016, 10:58 AM. Reason: Repairing quote so it displays properly.

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            • #21
              Thanks for the added details Aquamechanic, and welcome to HC.
              **********

              "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

              - George Carlin

              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

              - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

              "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

              - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

              Comment


              • #22
                I bought a third Zoom pedal, (223 I believe). It was only $25 because it had a fault. The pedal fails to initialize when powering up so you have to hold the Record button when powering up. It works fine so long as I don't shut it off.

                I did take it apart and made sure everything looked good. Battery seems to hold a charge. Didn't see any bad solder issues. I suspect its some logic failure. A single binary gate may be burned out and toggled in an on or off condition so it doesn't boot properly. This would be Impossible to find without a detailed logic diagram or another working unit to compare it too. I used to do allot of logic circuit repairs and know how test circuits but without a reference you have no way of knowing. No way of repairing it even if I did find a bad chip. The circuits use those microchips that require a special soldering rig and microscope to solder them in. You can barely see the connections with the naked eye and using a conventional soldering iron/ Forget it. Its not going to happen.

                I figure, the unit works using the Hard reset so theres no sense in making the situation worse. I'll just use it as is. Its actually a good sounding unit. Better then the 123 for quality. Beats are pretty similar though. They just have allot of extra riffs added for building patterns and some alternate patters and voicing's.

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