Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mastering a CD with both orchestral and rock music. NEED HELP!

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mastering a CD with both orchestral and rock music. NEED HELP!

    I just finished the orchestral score for a movie, and after sending the final cues to the producer, he informed me that he would like to make a soundtrack CD that includes both the orchestral score and some rock songs from the movie.

    This causes a problem because obviously, my orchestral tracks are like 1/2 the volume of the rock songs. The producer informed me that I should raise the levels of my tracks to be closer to the rock songs.

    I have several concerns. First, I don't want to compress the tracks because they were written to stay out of the way of the dialog. Adding compression may actually mess this up by making the soft parts louder. Second, I don't want to compress the tracks because they are orchestral and I don't want to mess up the sound.

    My suggestion to the producer was to have the mastering engineer produce 2 sets of tracks for the score. One set would be completely uncompressed and used in the movie. The second set could be compressed slightly to bring up the level so that anyone listening to the CD wouldn't go deaf when one of the rock songs started.

    The producer would also like me to even out the levels of the orchestral tracks. I suggested to him that this was the mastering engineer's responsibility. Is this not correct?

    Does anyone have any suggestions? What would you do if you had to master a CD like this?

  • #2
    Looks like you're going to have to squish the orchestral stuff. Too bad...
    The Signal Studio on MySpace

    Download The Shapes's EP + 4 singles, FREE (I play drums in this band)
    Download Fist Of God's EP, FREE (I play guitar in this band)

    Comment


    • #3
      The two kinds of music have such different average vs. peak levels that it's hard to intersperse them and still maintain a subjective sense of everything being at the same "volume."

      Are there any existing CDs that blend the kinds of music you are talking about? (All I can think of is "Help!" and "Days Of Future Passed," but there must be some newer examples.) I was thinking that you could listen to how they handled it and better yet take a look at the waveforms to see if there are signs of compression in the ones you think sound OK.

      Other than that, I've got nothin'.

      -CAG
      "Tips on Songwriting, Home Recording, and Live Sound"
      http://cheapadviceonmusic.com

      Comment


      • workstation M.I
        workstation M.I commented
        Editing a comment

        CheapAdviceGuy wrote:
        The two kinds of music have such different average vs. peak levels that it's hard to intersperse them and still maintain a subjective sense of everything being at the same "volume."

        Are there any existing CDs that blend the kinds of music you are talking about? (All I can think of is "Help!" and "Days Of Future Passed," but there must be some newer examples.) I was thinking that you could listen to how they handled it and better yet take a look at the waveforms to see if there are signs of compression in the ones you think sound OK.

        Other than that, I've got nothin'.

        -CAG

        Check out "Back To The Future" Soundtrack. The orchestral pieces basically *swamp* the "rock stuff"....


    • #4
      My suggestion to the producer was to have the mastering engineer produce 2 sets of tracks for the score. One set would be completely uncompressed and used in the movie. The second set could be compressed slightly to bring up the level so that anyone listening to the CD wouldn't go deaf when one of the rock songs started.

      The producer would also like me to even out the levels of the orchestral tracks. I suggested to him that this was the mastering engineer's responsibility. Is this not correct?

      Does anyone have any suggestions? What would you do if you had to master a CD like this?


      Your suggestion is what I would think would be the best thing to do.

      A good ME should be able to bring the levels up in such a manner that it doesn't destroy the dynamics and sound while still being loud enough unless the rock tracks are just utterly squished beyond compare.

      If I were mastering a CD like this, I would try and create more dynamics in everything, including the rock tracks, and I would mix the orchestral tracks in such a way that they still had dynamics but brought up the quiet passages more...at the very least, I'd want to mix it so it wasn't completely ruined by a ME.
      Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

      Comment









      Working...
      X