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  • Let's Play "Predict the Future of Music Software"

    Is it going to go away? Become more popular? Change direction? Lose relevance? Gain relevance?

    I'm doing a panel discussion on the Future of Music Software and would love to throw in some opinions from y'all for comment. DAWs, virtual instruments, andy of it is fair game. I don't want to say anything yet to skew the comments, but I will eventually so you'll have something with which you can argue

    Ready...set...go...!
    N E W S O N G ! To Say 'No' Would Be a Crime (Remix) is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

  • #2
    Software manufacturers will incorporate VR into the DAWs, or if really daring, try and design something from the ground up. There will be lots of resistance, particularly among older recording engineers and scribes, questioning why we need this and whether it makes us more efficient. Others will note that it takes a considerably more powerful setup (or expensive hardware) to run this, and will be resistant. Others will criticize the unwieldy goggles/apparatus. Several different attempts, all of which are interesting but not necessarily compelling, will be offered, and consequently, several years from now, it will still not be widely adopted.

    AI will continue to make inroads, offering tantalizing glimpses into a future in which software will begin to predict what the user is attempting to do or perhaps interact on a relatively small scale, and this will assist in doing things more efficiently. It will be used both in third-party plugins, but eventually incorporated into DAWs by the larger manufacturers. It will be interesting to see whether any voice-to-DAW AI will be implemented. I believe that some sort of predictive assistance might be of great help regardless.
    Last edited by UstadKhanAli; 01-13-2017, 02:15 PM.
    Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

    Comment


    • #3
      I think that in the next few years VR (as Ken mentioned) and advanced AI virtual "assistants" will become more prevalent and popular. Izotope's Neutron is just the beginning...
      **********

      "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

      - George Carlin

      "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

      - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

      "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

      - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

      Comment


      • #4
        The future is neither better nor worse, just different...

        VR consoles and outboard effects boxes will come into vogue. You will be able to choose from a number of consoles and effects boxes, and create virtual racks of equipment. You will be able, through expansion kits, be able to recreate in VR your favorite recording studio or design one of your own. AI will interpret the incoming audio sounds and adjust them from the actual recording to match the acoustics of the room in the VR environment.

        AI assistants will also become prevalent. You will be able to have the most popular and respected producers and engineers sit down at your VR console and show you how they will mix your song. In addition to assistants, AI will also allow you to have some of your musical heroes provide backing tracks or instrumental accompaniment.

        All of this and the associated cost involved will lead to three types of recording producers
        • Those in the home studio who can at best afford maybe a small VR console and nothing more, and so are left in the current environment much unchanged from what we see today.
        • Professional studios who can afford all of the latest tech wizardry and look down their noses at the those who can't
        • The traditionalist who will continue to use the old consoles, effect boxes and the traditional wares of the recording studio. There will emerge a niche business that provides support and parts for these older devices.
        In addition to the recording in a VR environment, performances will also be done in VR. Anyone with enough money can stream their own concert, using AI performers for background vocal and instrumentation. Members of the audience can purchase a copy of the show following the performance and relive the show anytime thereafter. This will also cause a number of small local theater houses to close do to a lack of bookings. Additionally, those in the business of providing the support for a live show will also find themselves unemployed. Pirates will also get very good and intercepting these streaming performances and providing them for free as a download on the 'dark web'.

        This new technology will also cause impacts on the justice system. Major studios will continue to demand that the government seek out and prosecute pirates. There will be numerous copyright lawsuits, as lawyers gear up to determine if a VR recreation of an analog console or other hardware device violates copyright.

        There will also be issues concerning the use of the AI performers who provide background vocals. This will come from families of the deceased performers who are recreated in VR environment. Disney Corporation will be at forefront of these lawsuits as they attempt to expand copyright to include the artist themselves (to prevent anyone from recreating a performer) and to expand the length of copyright to the life of the artist plus 150 years for an individual, and life of the artist plus 225 years for any corporation that owns the rights to the performer.
        The Mandolin Picker

        "Bless your hearts... and all your vital organs" - John Duffy

        "Got time to breath, got time for music!"- Briscoe Darling, Jr.

        Comment


        • #5
          Eventide Structural Effects:
          Last edited by Ed A.; 01-13-2017, 04:03 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
            I think that in the next few years VR (as Ken mentioned) and advanced AI virtual "assistants" will become more prevalent and popular. Izotope's Neutron is just the beginning...

            I just see VR taking a really long time to get a foothold. AI virtual "assistants" such as Neutron or other things....I see people really wanting that because it can make a large difference in ease of use and workflow. That's what we want ultimately. Great implementation of AI could improve recordings as well.

            Would implementation of VR ease workflow? It's possible. But there's some hurdles, goggles, and computer horsepower to overcome, it seems. And the question of whether it would really impact the recording.
            Last edited by UstadKhanAli; 01-13-2017, 04:53 PM.
            Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

            Comment


            • #7
              I honestly don't see a ceiling for the advancement of music software. I don't see a ceiling for music or the ways to make it. The sky and the Human Spirit are the limit.
              http://thebasement.createaforum.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ed A. View Post
                Eventide Structural Effects:
                I am SOOO going to check that out at NAMM. It sounds very intriguing!
                **********

                "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                - George Carlin

                "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                Comment


                • Ed A.
                  Ed A. commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I'm hoping FFT and resynthesis in real time with an intuitive UI. Maybe with the ability to easily modify parameters while playing live.

              • #9
                This is great stuff...I'm going to quote some of you (with attribution, of course!) and throw it out for discussion at the panel.
                N E W S O N G ! To Say 'No' Would Be a Crime (Remix) is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                Comment


                • #10
                  Augmented reality is more likely than virtual reality. Think Pokemon Go for music . Supplementing the studio or stage environment you're working in and not being totally immersive like VR.
                  Behringer's DeepMind 12 has an AR interface available for it that's a crude example of what might be available in the future.
                  Last edited by Ed A.; 01-13-2017, 11:49 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Anderton View Post
                    This is great stuff...I'm going to quote some of you (with attribution, of course!) and throw it out for discussion at the panel.

                    Can you preface our quotes with something like, "Noted futurist _______ had this brilliant thought...."?

                    Or perhaps, "Acknowledged as a visionary by many, _______ had this rather prescient insight about..."
                    Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      The future of music software? "Alexa, write me a hit song about my journey to Mars."

                      I can't see any practical use for VR in music that we listen to or compose. Forget it! It's only going to be a toy that we get tired of after a while.

                      But it all depends on what reality you're virtualizing. I can see applications for creating new instruments in software that can't physically exist (at least in a practical world). We can already do that, but maybe some of the VR techniques can allow us to play instruments that we can't play physically. Think about if, in your simulated virtual world, your arms were six feet long, Or that you had three or four arms. Think about the piano you could play in virtual real time.

                      But this isn't really about music creation software, Personally, I would have a big problem using a mixing console with no there there, where all I have to do is move a hand to change the level of a track in a mix. I need a physical anchor to know what I'm doing, not a virtual one. I've proved that to myself by recognizing the difficulty that I have with mixing using only a touch screen. I move the wrong control a lot. And, boy would I ever not like to be wearing goggles that show me a picture of a mixing console and my hand approaching a knob. I think that someone who grew up playing computer games could get used to that, but I grew up listening to the radio and flying model airplanes.

                      What I'd like to see in music software are things that make it easier to use when doing common things. Better documentation would be a good start. Much as I dislike reading a manual from a computer screen, really good interactive documentation would be helpful. Here's where some virtual intelligence could come in. Another thing I'd like to see is better standardization of the vocabulary and common functions. No matter what program I'm working with, I want to be able to use the same half-dozen or so keyboard shortcuts that I've been using for 25 years - Ctrl-S to save, Ctrl-X to cut, Ctrl-C to copy, Ctrl-V to paste . . . and on a touch screen, where's the Control (OK, the Apple) key? Sometimes it's a long press, sometimes it's a double-tap.

                      But I think that for a while yet, people will be making some good music on their computers and phones, and more people will be making bad music, no matter where the software takes them..
                      --
                      "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                      Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I left off predictions about creating instruments that can't possibly exist or can't be played or whatever because I used to predict this, and there just doesn't seem to be a lot of interest in this. I would love for this to happen, but I just don't see a lot of people clamoring for this unfortunately.
                        Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by UstadKhanAli View Post
                          I left off predictions about creating instruments that can't possibly exist or can't be played or whatever because I used to predict this, and there just doesn't seem to be a lot of interest in this. I would love for this to happen, but I just don't see a lot of people clamoring for this unfortunately.
                          This is a problem. We're talking about stuff that only a handful of people are really interested in, and doing that kind of thing right costs a lot of money that a manufacturer won't recoup from just a few hundred sales. I've been playing with IK Multimedia's MODO Bass lately, not because I need it, but because I thought it was interesting and potentially educational (it is). But I want it to go further. I want to go further than choose which body style I want my bass to be, I want to be able to choose the wood, have it model that, and let me hear what difference it makes. Or make a bass that looks like a banjo or Prince's guitar, or have a longer or shorter scale length. The reality is that it has a lot of good bass sounds that you can diddle by swapping pickups, using different gauge strings, mounting the pickups in different position - things that somebody with a bass sound you like may have done with real parts. But it costs about $300, and is bass sound that important? To some, sure, but to enough people to get the price down to $50 or even $100? Doubtful.



                          --
                          "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                          Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            I'm heading up a project now at our local music school where kids who have never played an instrument nor have any formal knowledge of music get to sit down in front of a computer with a DAW and over the school year we teach them what they need to know to create music. Music that they want to create, not something somebody else tell them to make.

                            When planning for the project I was wondering what would be the hardest obstacle to overcome. DAW interface issues? What music knowledge they need to move forward? Their willingness to learn either technology or music theory? It proved to be neither. The most difficult thing is to get the kids to realise they need patience to create music. To realise that if the first idea doesn't work then work on the next one. It's quite obvious that some people (kids and adults) think that as there's a computer involved they really will not have to do much work to create a hit song. They've seen Aviicci or other artists on TV doing their thing so it must be easy and quick.

                            I'm hopeing for a DAW with assisted learning for the user in some way. I don't know how to program it by I do have some ideas.

                            But I still think that while the computer is a wonderful thing it's nowhere near as wonderful as the combination of the human brain and the human spirit when it comes to creating music that can move you and touch your heart.

                            If you see me at NAMM, stop me and say hello!

                            Cheers,

                            Mats N
                            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                            BT King - all my backing tracks can be found at :
                            http://nermark.articulateimages.com

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