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  • Creating CD labels for my CD's

    I asked a question over in the Music Distribution subforum, but it's quite quiet over there. Basically I want to have some CD labels pre-printed with my own design. The design is a bright yellow label with a bit of graphics in green. I plan to have this part done at a local art supply store that does printing services. Then, when I have a CD that I'd like to share with friends (or possibly archive to document my creative journey), I would like to feed the pre-printed Yellow and Green labels through my (black toner) printer for a track/song list.

    Someone (thank you 1001gear) said that there's a school of thought that says that paper labels (linked below) are problematic. I'm looking for experiences, wisdom, comments etc. My plan would be to use these labels for some years to come.

    Thanks, as always, for your feedback.

    https://www.amazon.com/CD-Blank-Labe...lank+cd+labels
    Last edited by davd_indigo; 12-28-2016, 08:09 AM.
    https://soundcloud.com/david-goethe/tracks

    Dave's ,YouTube channel

  • #2
    I don't see anything definite on this whole question. But, from what I read, there are enough doubts to steer me away from using adhesive paper labels. Guess I'm stuck with the Sharpie.

    https://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/sec5.html
    https://soundcloud.com/david-goethe/tracks

    Dave's ,YouTube channel

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    • #3
      There are specialized printers that print rignt on a disk, but for a short run, Epson (maybe others, too) has an adapter for some of their ink jet printers that carry a disk to the print head and support it for printing. You may have to give up the yellow background, though, unless you want to go through a lot of ink cartridges.

      I've heard stories of problems with paper labels on CDs but never experienced a problem until I loaded one into the multi-disk CD player in my car . . . it loaded and played fine, but I had to coax and pull it out. It got about as far as the edge of the loading slot and stopped. Unlabeled CDs loaded and unloaded with no problems.

      There was no evidence of stickum on the label or the disk, could have been just due to the added thickness. and too-tight tolerance in the player's eject mechanism.
      --
      "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
      Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

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      • #4
        We have had the stickers come off. Fortunately it was in a CD deck where the top opened instead of a front slot loader. Ever since, we have not used the adhesive labels.

        You might be able to get a printing company to print a bunch of blank CDs for you, and then burn them as needed.
        The Mandolin Picker

        "Bless your hearts... and all your vital organs" - John Duffy

        "Got time to breath, got time for music!"- Briscoe Darling, Jr.

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        • #5
          Yeah, paper labels are not a great idea. Gave a disc to a friend. He left it in his car player on a hot day. The adhesive went all gooey. When he ejected the disc the label peeled up and the glue gunked up the mechanism. YMMV

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          • #6
            Stay away from the whole paper stick on labels Dave. Take it from me. They cause all kinds of transport issues. TDK makes printable blank cd's. but you have to have a printer that will print directly on the media. I've got a LightScribe DVD/CD that uses the transports to etch designs and text on to the media, but there is no color at all.
            Mandolin picker had a good suggestion about seeing if somebody like DiscMakers could provide a pre-printed batch of blanks for you.

            Stay away from the sticky labels though Bro.
            http://thebasement.createaforum.com/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mandolin Picker View Post

              You might be able to get a printing company to print a bunch of blank CDs for you, and then burn them as needed.
              You might be on to something. If I could at least get a batch of CD's with my signature in black and a logo of 5 (white and black) piano keys. Then I could write the project name (say "Mid-November 2016" for example) in sharpie. I'm trying to make the CD more visually appealing though - I guess on a shoe string budget.
              ]
              I'm thinking of colored plastic envelopes. And maybe printing colored sticker with pertinent info to stick on the envelopes.


              I just did a quick search and found the following. It appears they deal in batches of 300.

              https://nationwidedisc.com/cd-replication-in-bulk2
              Last edited by davd_indigo; 12-28-2016, 08:02 PM.
              https://soundcloud.com/david-goethe/tracks

              Dave's ,YouTube channel

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              • #8
                Here's another thought that you might be interested in. Verbatim sells CDs that look like the old 45 RPM records. Here is a link to Amazon so that you can see what they look like (https://www.amazon.com/Verbatim-Digi.../dp/B00009WO51). If you combine this with a CD case that you print yourself (most all word processing programs have a CD case or CD envelope template) you could create a unique package for your music. Even writing on the label with a Sharpie would add to it.

                Just an idea

                Click image for larger version

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                Last edited by Mandolin Picker; 12-29-2016, 09:09 AM.
                The Mandolin Picker

                "Bless your hearts... and all your vital organs" - John Duffy

                "Got time to breath, got time for music!"- Briscoe Darling, Jr.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mandolin Picker View Post
                  Here's another thought that you might be interested in. Verbatim sells CDs that look like the old 45 RPM records. Here is a link to Amazon so that you can see what they look like....

                  If you combine this with a CD case that you print yourself (most all word processing programs have a CD case or CD envelope template) you could create a unique package for your music. Even writing on the label with a Sharpie would add to it.

                  Just an idea

                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]n31886783[/ATTACH]
                  Good ideas. And your idea triggered my thought to search for colored CDs. And I found the link below. Then I had the thought - well actually the question - I wonder if I could get a rubber stamp made with my signature and my logo design. Then I could write the variables (the project name, date, whatever) in a green sharpie.

                  Now I'm wondering about stamping a CD with a rubber stamp. Chemical reactions, problems with the pressure of a rubber stamp on a CD. I dunno. Once I started reading about problems with chemicals in CDs corroding and so on. I take nothing for granted.

                  If anyone knows anything about potential rubber stamp problems please weigh in. This has been a productive thread for me. Thanks.

                  http://www.checkoutstore.com/Generic...mHsaAl3S8P8HAQ
                  https://soundcloud.com/david-goethe/tracks

                  Dave's ,YouTube channel

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