Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

MP3 format found to remove emotional context

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MP3 format found to remove emotional context

    "File compression format found to alter timbre of music causing loss of some emotional context"

    This isn't hard to see when you realize that compression will make the louder parts quieter and the softer parts louder, so you won't jump out of your seats when the 1812 overture canons go off.

    https://techxplore.com/news/2016-12-...usic-loss.html
    Last edited by techristian; 12-14-2016, 10:25 AM.
    http://musicinit.com/fastfingers.php An Experiment in 80's Technology

    http://youtube.com/techristian My YOUTUBE channel
    Music videos at http://musicinit.com/video.php

  • #2
    Same can be said of simply recording something.
    Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








    Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

    Comment


    • #3
      Now have them do another study comparing the emotional response to 8-track tapes. That should be a far more dramatic emotional drop-off!
      Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

      Comment


      • #4
        I can't count the number of great songs that I hated because I heard them on the radio. Compression kills.

        Comment


        • #5
          The graph shows 112, 56, and 32 kbps. Well of course those sounds suck! The conclusion I would draw isn't that MP3 per se is the problem, low bit rates are. Hell, if you listen to a WAV or AIFF 24-bit file with a 16 or 32 kHz sample rate, it's going to suck too.

          I have the Sonnox Pro Codec that lets you hear what's removed when converting uncompressed to compressed formats. Once you get above 256 kbps, it's mostly scratchy, treble sounds, and not much of them. I'm not trying to defend MP3...I'm trying to say I think the study is flawed, to say the least.

          How much is lost with vinyl when you boost and cut by 20dB going in and coming out?

          Here are the results of my survey that includes a sample of one person (me): Live music sounds more lifelike than recorded music. Can I get a big grant now and be considered a Famous Researcher?
          Last edited by Anderton; 12-18-2016, 07:25 PM.
          CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

          Comment


          • #6
            I heard Cream play "Crossroads" live in concert...On vinyl, on 8 track, on cassette, on cd, on MP3....It rocks in any format or form.

            Jus' sayin'....

            Take a breath folks....


            http://thebasement.createaforum.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Your second sentence is talking about a different kind of compression. mp3 compresses a wav file to make it smaller but still sound the same (almost. Some of the higher frequencies are lost, ones that no one over 50 can hear anyway.)

              ​Compressing sound to decrease the dynamic range is something totally different.
              Best deals on recording
              Gismo Studios: link
              My original music on ReverbNation: link
              Gismo Studios on ReverbNation: link
              Islam is a much greater threat to the free world than Communism ever was. - Easy Listener

              Comment


              • #8
                Dynamic compression of any type diminishes emotional content. How much compression vs. how much degradation is the question.

                After all, dynamics in speaking, singing, and playing are all emotional conveyances.

                When recording backing tracks for my duo, I do not compress at all. However, as a compromise, I may use a peak limiter for a stray wild peak or two and then bring the track level up a bit.

                When doing studio work, I let the engineer worry about that. I'm just sax for hire so I prepare and then play my best to support whatever I'm hired to play on.

                But there is more than one correct way to make music.

                Notes
                Bob "Notes" Norton
                Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
                The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gismo recording View Post
                  Your second sentence is talking about a different kind of compression. mp3 compresses a wav file to make it smaller but still sound the same (almost. Some of the higher frequencies are lost, ones that no one over 50 can hear anyway.)

                  ​Compressing sound to decrease the dynamic range is something totally different.

                  Yup. But it seems the topic is going in the direction of dynamic range compression, which is not what the article is about.
                  CHECK IT OUT: Lilianna!, my latest song, is now streamable from YouTube.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X