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  • Proof You Can Still Make Big Money in Music

    Forbes' annual Electronic Cash Kings list of the top-earning DJ’s shows 10 people collectively earning over $250 million through music, gigs and brand endorsements. Calvin Harris gets paid more than $400,000 per Vegas gig...here are the top 10.

    1. Calvin Harris – $63 million 2. Tiesto – $38 million 3. David Guetta – $28 million 4. Zedd – $24.5 million 5. Steve Aoki – $23.5 million 6. Diplo – $23 million 7. Skrillex – $20 million 8. Kaskade – $19 million 9. Martin Garrix – $16 million 10. Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike – $15.5 million
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  • #2
    That ain't music - I'd rather douse myself with gasoline...
    Last edited by RoadRanger; 08-22-2016, 11:45 AM.

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    • 1001gear
      1001gear commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes and prolly not.

  • #3
    I was doing a seminar once on DJ techniques and paid someone $20 to yell out "That isn't music!!" to generate a little controversy

    I think that being able to entertain thousands of people for several hours at a stretch without making a single mistake is pretty difficult. Like most music only a small percentage is exceptional. But I'll never forget the first time I saw a really, really good DJ in action. It was highly educational, and downright inspiring.
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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    • #4
      All of those guys on the list (at least the ones I have heard of) are producers and songwriters as well as DJs. I don't know if anyone who just spins records making that kind of money, no matter how technically proficient. Not all of these guys are DJs in the traditional sense. For example, a Skrillex show features Skrillex playing his own tunes. His tracks are prerecorded, not sequenced. He used to take a DAW onstage with him, but he stopped in order to make shows simpler and more reliable. He has control over a few parameters like filters.

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      • #5
        Originally posted by Anderton View Post
        But I'll never forget the first time I saw a really, really good DJ in action. It was highly educational, and downright inspiring.
        Oy Vey - the Pod People got our Craig .

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        • #6
          EDM is bigger than ever. Whether or not it's "real" music, people listen to it, people dance to it, and a few people make really big money producing it. From a recent Forbes article:

          "In the Las Vegas bidding war, there have been no holds barred on what clubs are offering star artists. Among the benefits are promotional deals–which have placed the faces of DJs on everything from hotel key cards to billboards; tailor-made performances; and, most of all, money. On a busy weekend in Sin City, Hakkasan, for example, can pay anywhere from $200,000 to $300,000 per night to its top acts."

          I suspect that's more per show than Celene Dion gets.
          --
          "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
          Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

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          • #7
            I was gonna say drug dealers - oops, but industry still rakes it in. I'll settle for free gear. Any suggestions?
            Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...







            Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

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            • #8
              A list recently released by Forbes Magazine showing the world’s twenty richest DJs has been found to contain no actual DJs at all....

              http://wundergroundmusic.com/no-actu...hest-djs-list/

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              • #9
                Originally posted by Anderton;n31799552[B
                ]I was doing a seminar once on DJ techniques and paid someone $20 to yell ou[/B]t "That isn't music!!" to generate a little controversy

                I think that being able to entertain thousands of people for several hours at a stretch without making a single mistake is pretty difficult. Like most music only a small percentage is exceptional. But I'll never forget the first time I saw a really, really good DJ in action. It was highly educational, and downright inspiring.


                I would have done it for 15 bucks.



                _____________________________________
                Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase.

                Join Date: Aug 2001
                Location: N. Adams, MA USA
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                • #10
                  I guess they are providing a product that people are willing to pay for.
                  Don Boomer

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                  • #11
                    If you're at the age (and have sufficient socio-economic means) where you can hang out in clubs and raves on a regular basis, then DJs probably appeal to you... but for those of us who don't spend our nights dancing in clubs, we're hardly exposed to them at all. Seems to me that DJs are mainly about the live experience and have much less influence and exposure when it comes to recordings, despite the success of some DJ/producers.
                    **********

                    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                    - George Carlin

                    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

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                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
                      If you're at the age (and have sufficient socio-economic means) where you can hang out in clubs and raves on a regular basis, then DJs probably appeal to you... but for those of us who don't spend our nights dancing in clubs, we're hardly exposed to them at all.
                      David Guetta is a straight up pop star due to his association with Nicki Minaj and Sia, and sells a lot of records. Diplo is the guy behind Major Lazer, the top selling band on iTunes. A few of the guys on the list are known primarily for dance parties, which I have very little interest in. But a bunch of them you would be exposed to just by listening to top 40.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by RoadRanger View Post
                        Oy Vey - the Pod People got our Craig .
                        This was in 1999, so I've been podded for quite a while

                        The skill set required to be a good DJ these days is pretty comprehensive. You could say a conductor isn't a musician because he just waves a stick around, but what a conductor has to know to wave the stick around properly is not easy.

                        Check out the article So You Think EDM Sucks? Read This for more thoughts on the matter...
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #14
                          Originally posted by Zooey View Post

                          David Guetta is a straight up pop star due to his association with Nicki Minaj and Sia, and sells a lot of records. Diplo is the guy behind Major Lazer, the top selling band on iTunes. A few of the guys on the list are known primarily for dance parties, which I have very little interest in. But a bunch of them you would be exposed to just by listening to top 40.
                          Sounds like they're notable for their production skills then, and not strictly as DJs.
                          **********

                          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                          - George Carlin

                          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Yes that's money in music, but not money in making music, instead money in playing music. Slight difference.

                            There was a time when a good radio DJ made a fortune too - Murray the K, Cacey Kasemm, Wolfman Jack, Cousin Brucie, Alan Freed come to mind. They played recordings, but very few had a hit record of their own (I think "The Big Bopper" was a radio DJ - correct me if that's wrong).

                            A good live dance party DJ shares a skill with a good band leader, calling the right song at the right time for the audience.

                            And I can't find anything wrong with DJs or EDM, even though I don't care to be a DJ and I listen to very little EDM. But there's a market for it, so who am I to criticize?

                            But I really don't want to be a DJ. Although I call the right song at the right time (most of the time anyway) for my audience, the real joy is when the sax, flute, or wind synth is in my mouth, the guitar in my hand, or my mouth is on the microphone and the music seems to flow through me instead of from me -- the place where there is no space, no time, not even words (when I'm singing it's memorized articulations), but just the bliss of being absorbed by the music.

                            But that's just me.

                            I've been a musician all my life, and so far have avoided real jobs except for two times while I was wondering what it is to be normal - and I found out normal is over-rated.

                            I feel like even though I was in a band that almost but never quite made it, so I didn't make the big bucks, I'm still lucky enough to make a decent living doing music and nothing but music. It beats any day job I can think of.

                            Insights and incites by Notes
                            Bob "Notes" Norton
                            Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
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