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Any piece of music had a lasting profound affect on you?

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  • Any piece of music had a lasting profound affect on you?

    Like so many I've always been fascinated by the trans-formative power of music. It's one thing to like a piece of music, it's another to be deeply moved by it. It probably doesn't happen that often but when it does...........

    Anyway, below is one such experience for me. Hopefully others can describe theirs.


    On Wayne Shorter's version of “Dindi” (from the album Super Nova)

    I cannot think of a single piece of music which had such a dramatic, almost instant converting effect on me as this one. I was just getting into Jazz, exploring various aspects, but sticking more to the melodic pieces for the most part.
    I was listening to an after mid-night jazz program on my small mono radio when this piece came on. At first it sounded like just cacophony, then I began to notice rhythmic elements, but it wasn’t till the singer started – everything calmed down – it seemed to me like being in the eye of a hurricane. Beautiful sad singing till part way through the vocal, the woman’s voice falters and she begins to cry and she simply stops singing. There is a wonderful hesitation at that moment in Wayne’s band, as if asking musical: “what just happened?” then the “cacophony” picks up closing out the piece. I was truly astonished at what I’d heard and at the same time I understood the beauty of jazz on a whole new level.


  • #2
    Too many to mention but here are a few that come to mind quickly

    Dvorak's 9th symphony "From The New World"
    Tchaikovsky's "Romeo & Juliet" also 6th symphony, Marche Slave, and Capriccio Italien
    Rimsky-Korsokov's "Russian Easter Overture
    Stan Getz Quartet versions of Joy Spring, Samba Triste and Blood Count (add a few more Getz)
    Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen
    Shastakovitch's 4th symphony
    Blue Rondo ala Turk from Brubeck's Time Out album
    Rachmaninov's Isle of the Dead
    The entire CD of James Brown's first At The Apollo (1962)
    The Beatles Abbey Road medley
    Prokoviev's Romeo and Juliet ballet suite also The Love for 3 oranges and Scythian Suite
    Mark Murply's version Goodbye Pork Pie Hat, Ballad of the Sad Young Men, How Are You Dreaming?
    Santana's solo in Black Magic Woman (still thrills me)
    Same for the guitar solo in the Eagles Hotel California
    Gino Vanelli People Gotta Move

    I could go on and on and on. Songs that never fail to make me stop what I'm doing and move me emotionally.

    I guess I'm easy when it comes to music

    Sorry for the typos and misspelled names
    Bob "Notes" Norton
    Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
    Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
    The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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    • #3
      First two Brahms Symphonies. Asstd Beethoven. Most of JSB WTC book1. Schubert orchestral stuff in a casual way. Asstd other symphonic works.First four Jed Zeppelin. Most of Buddy Rich. LC Room 335. Asstd std schitload.

      Most recently; a couple Morten Lauridsen pieces, Magnum Mysterium, and Lux Aeterna.
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      • #4

        Thanks for the replies. What I was hoping for was a description of the trans-formative experience from a piece (or pieces) of music and maybe a musical link. But then I realize it can be difficult to put into words what such an experience was like.........

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        • #5
          Here's clips anyway.




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          • #6
            Sorry, like many males, my emotions are not connected to my speaking voice.

            I feel them, but really can't explain.

            There is scientific evidence that female brains are connected to their speech centers while males are not. Of course, variances occur.

            There is a nice book called, "Why Gender Matters .. ..." that we got turned on to by a teacher. She said it worked wonders for her teaching skills for each gender. I wish I had this book when my children were small, it might have helped a lot. They turned out to be great adults, so we didn't do a bad job rearing them, but this could have made the bumps in the road a little smoother.

            Here is a try.

            A few years ago we went to hear the Czech Philharmonic in concert. After the intermission they played Dvorak's 9th. I played this in school, I have a couple of different recordings of this work, and I've heard it done by at least a dozen world-famous symphony orchestras.

            The slow movement (Largo) is usually done by conductors who seem to want it to sound light and pretty. The CPO played it slower, dynamic, and very intense. I looked at my wife and we both had tears streaming down our cheeks.

            It's not the only time music has put my bladder too close to my eyes but it was probably the most intense.

            Insights and incites by Notes
            Bob "Notes" Norton
            Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
            Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
            The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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            • #7
              The clips I posted are self emoting.
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              • #8
                So I`ve heard this song numerous time by other tenors but this the only version that gets me. Something about Pavarottis delivery... theres a longing at first and then overwhelming victory to finish the piece.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTFUM4Uh_6Y

                Mozart Requiem also evokes the same feelings for me. Not sure what it is about the requiem but its almost as if Mozart lives every time I hear it. He does.


                Heres another piece by Mozart that I just love...
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KUDs8KJc_c
                Last edited by Ernest Buckley; 05-23-2016, 02:17 PM.

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                • #9
                  A classical piece which grabbed me emotionally instantly and still does today, is A Lark Ascending by Vaughan Williams. I found this version which I particularly like.

                   

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                  • #10
                    "Any piece of music had a lasting profound affect on you?"

                    Oh, absolutely. I really had trouble listening to Jefferson Starship in any capacity after "We Built This City".
                    Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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                    • #11
                      Dammit I like that tune. Harrumph.

                      storms off...
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                      • #12
                        Kinda late to the party here, but I can talk to an empty room - do it all the time anyway

                        Actually this OP I found hard to answer right off the top of my head. Had to let it sort of simmer on a back brain burner for a bit....

                        I mean - "transformative" is not the same thing as "emotional." And lots of very important experiences come and go without all that much emotional drama.

                        So, in my slow, analytical, ponderous way, I started thinking about different kinds of transformations music has triggered for me.

                        For now, I'll just stick to the music that woke me up to the power of music. Not just power in the sense of big and bigger power, but also (and more importantly I think) in the variety of powers music can wield.

                        Exciting stuff heard way early, like the William Tell Overture (theme to The Lone Ranger) or the Peter Gunn theme or my first intimation of lewdness and strange disturbing feelings from hearing The Stripper at a pre-teen age.

                        Introductions to calmness and tenderness from music like Silent Night or Love Me Tender or the first movement of the Moonlight Sonata or Debussy's Clair de lune. Notions of sassiness or sly humor or that sliding, floating euphoria that jazz can produce, from stuff like Take Five or Night Train or Moonlight Serenade.

                        I mean all this stuff was formative, laid down reference points not just for music, but also good tunes are moods and emotions made self-aware and shareable. So every good song performs some particular task of consciousness-raising (to use an old hippy phrase.) You feel it in the music, you find it in real life, too. Back and forth, art morphing into life and life being formed into art. That's a transformation, for sure.

                        nat whilk ii



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