Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another early surf guitar player has passed

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another early surf guitar player has passed

    Brian Carman of the Chantays.
    When I was a kid, Pipeline was a must know tune.
    http://www.ocregister.com/articles/s...-pipeline.html
    My Web Site - Tunes - Pictures - Guitar Projects - Native American Style Flute Projects - Hard Rock Cafe Guitar Pins
    My Eclectic YouTube Channel

  • #2
    Surf instrumentals were a bit before my time except to know as "oldies". But I've always wondered: how was it that that sort of instrumental music became associated with surf culture specifically?
    ______________

    Comment


    • #3
      I think the simplest explanation is that it was the sound that the Southern California surfers preferred in the early 60's. You can find info on the topic if you Google something like Surf Music Origins.
      My Web Site - Tunes - Pictures - Guitar Projects - Native American Style Flute Projects - Hard Rock Cafe Guitar Pins
      My Eclectic YouTube Channel

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Jeff Leites View Post
        I think the simplest explanation is that it was the sound that the Southern California surfers preferred in the early 60's. You can find info on the topic if you Google something like Surf Music Origins.

        Yes. There's probably been books written about it. Just thought maybe someone who was there would have an easy answer for it. Obviously they preferred it, but there's usually some reason WHY a particular thing happens the way it did.

        At some point, those songs started taking on surf titles. Like "Riptide". But the first ones probably did not? I know the music originated in Orange County, so maybe it was an early instrumental band who was popular in a local surf hotspot perhaps? I think it was Dick Dale who first gave the music its Mexican and Middle Eastern sounds, which have nothing really to do with surf culture. So that always seems a little odd to me as well.


        ______________

        Comment


        • #5
          I was a pre-teen kid living outside of Philadelphia back then, but according to one of the first surf players, Paul Johnson (of the Belairs), after hearing his band, some surfer told him that his music was the sound he heard in his head when he was surfing. I believe I've heard Dick Dale tell the some story.

          You're right about the early instrumentals not having surf names. A lot of those tunes predated surf music but were adopted by surf music crowd.
          My Web Site - Tunes - Pictures - Guitar Projects - Native American Style Flute Projects - Hard Rock Cafe Guitar Pins
          My Eclectic YouTube Channel

          Comment


          • #6
            Also, like most pop music, it was a function of the technology of the time. Wammy bars and tremolo and heavy reverb. And, IIRC, wasn't surf music the first to use electric bass in a "rock" band setting?
            Last edited by guido61; 03-04-2015, 11:52 PM.
            ______________

            Comment


            • #7

              Today, there's an interesting meld between Surf and Spaghetti Western music. There are bands that specialize in those genres.
              Last edited by Etienne Rambert; 03-05-2015, 07:41 AM.
              He has escaped! Youtube , ​Murika , France

              Comment


              • #8
                RIP, Mr Carman.

                We were mightily proud of Carman and the rest of the Chantays back in Santa Ana, California, in the day.
                .

                music and social links | recent listening

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by guido61 View Post
                  Surf instrumentals were a bit before my time except to know as "oldies". But I've always wondered: how was it that that sort of instrumental music became associated with surf culture specifically?
                  Santa Ana and the surrounding areas (OC was just starting to fill in at beginning of the 1960s) were home to suburban kids who would drive the surf phenomenon -- as well as surfboard manufacturing, Hobie had a fibreglass fabrication shop south of Santa Ana. (I used to go there and cadge scrap balsa wood for carving model car prototypes [rather unsuccessfully but that was supposedly how the big guys did it then] and Hobart Alter, the main guy would be there. A nice guy who didn't freak out to see a 10 year old scrounging in his scrap bins.. It was a fairly small facility at the time.)

                  The Chantays went to the same high school as my mom, actually, though a decade and a half later. According to the OC Register article:

                  . “Pipeline” started out as a song called “44 Magnum,” and after the guys saw the Jimmy Stewart Western “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance,” they renamed it “Liberty’s Whip.”
                  I seem to recall having heard the second title ("Liberty's Whip") someplace along the line in the OC studio scene, an idle trivia question from someone, I think.
                  Last edited by blue2blue; 03-05-2015, 10:22 AM.
                  .

                  music and social links | recent listening

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Affluence, proximity to the labels and movies, leisure, American dream, those damned Beatles, did I mention leisure?
                    Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








                    Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ah yes...."California Dreamin'".

                      Leisure and relative affluence were certainly a big part of it and the whole "Rock" scene as we know it. The concept of the American Teenager didn't really exist prior to WWII. And without the American Teenager, with plenty of time after school and on weekends and not needing to help support the family or work on the farm or such, and being able to pursuit such dreams as owning a car---would there ever have really been "rock n roll" at all?

                      As a musician who also has a deep interest in history and sociology, I've always been fascinated by the influence of culture and economy on popular music. It's something that even us musicians don't think about much, because we seem to just take for granted that the music just somehow exists within us, or has somehow always existed.

                      Proximity to movies certainly had a big part in spreading the California Dream across the country and around the world. The Beatles? They actually came along a bit later and, if anything, had the biggest influence in taking rock music beyond the simplistic trappings of the "surf" sounds. .



                      ______________

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Forgive the bias of my time line. I'm from the 50s but it wasn't till the 60s I first heard the Ventures and I recall the Beatles were right there with Wanna Hold Your Hand and whatever else they did in the Ed Sullivan era. It seems to me now that the surf movement got ramped to compete with the Brits.
                        Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








                        Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1001gear View Post
                          Forgive the bias of my time line. I'm from the 50s but it wasn't till the 60s I first heard the Ventures and I recall the Beatles were right there with Wanna Hold Your Hand and whatever else they did in the Ed Sullivan era. It seems to me now that the surf movement got ramped to compete with the Brits.
                          The Ventures predated the Beatles and, if anything, it was the Beatles and the British Invasion that killed the Surf movement. With the exception of the Hawaii Five-O theme a few years later (which was a hit for obvious reasons beyond surf culture) the Ventures had their last hits in 1964.

                          The post-Beatles ramping up of the surf sound you speak of was the Beach Boys/Jan and Dean thing which, of course, started prior to the Beatles hitting the shores in 1964 and, by adding vocals to it, was taking it into another direction where the focus wasn't really much on the guitar sounds at all. And, of course, the Beatles and the Brits were a big influence on pushing Brian Wilson out of the surf/car songs and, by '66, leaving acts like Jan and Dean in the proverbial dust.

                          Even by '65, I don't think the surf sound was ramping up nearly as much as it was just limping along.
                          ______________

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dick Dale was (is still?) a surfer, and played a lot of gigs in venues where surfers congregated. As Jeff mentioned, he was trying to create a sound that he associated with what he heard in his head when he was surfing. I suspect that his popularity, coupled with his love of the lifestyle and sport probably had something to do with it...
                            **********

                            "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                            - George Carlin

                            "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                            - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                            "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                            - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Surf and cars combined. The music was great for surfing or cruising. The feeling of coming off the line and shooting the curl are very similar. Surf Rock was before my time, but I got the bug in my ear years before my teens from my older sisters when they were teens. When I got to high school I got into cars and street racing... and was the only one at the time in my area blasting surf music from a car. I still have most of the original vinyl I bought, as well as some older stuff passed down to me by my sisters. Beach Boys, Venture, Jan and Dean, The Frogmen, etc. Fun days!
                              <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

                              “Music is well said to be the speech of angels... nothing among the utterances allowed to man is felt to be so divine."

                              ~Thomas Carlyle

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X