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  • Wow, this is cool!



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaV-S5ivX3E





    So on Thanksgiving we were hanging out with this lady who was in Topanga in the 1960s, and was a groupie, hanging out with Neil Young and all these bands and telling all sorts of stories about the scene then.



    She played the above song, and I was really impressed, having heard of Paul Butterfield before but not being really familiar with this. I especially love the energetic Arabesque guitar break in the middle, but it's all good.
    Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

  • #2
    They were the first of the young blues bands and were pretty well respected both by the record buyers and the established Chicago blues artists of the time like Muddy Waters and Junior Wells. Though a few of the original group are dead, I believe that Elvin Bishop still has a band. One of the several guitarists in the band was Buzz Feiten who, these days, is probably best known for his system for improved intonation of electric guitars.
    --
    "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
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    • #3
      Interesting, didn't know that about Buzz Feiten.



      I've been listening to this album "East West" on Spotify, and really enjoy it. Diverse collection that includes some rather jazzy approaches to rhythms, some great guitar phrasing, some Chicago blues, and then the song "East West", which is fantastic to my ears. Absolutely love it.



      I love how we were introduced to it as well, hearing stories from a former groupie who hung out with a lot of these guys in Topanga and Chicago and Arizona and elsewhere while we were listening to this, Charles Musselwhite, Frank Zappa, and a bunch of other stuff.



      And this whole conversation started because I said, "Hey, have you heard the new Neil Young and Crazy Horse album? It coulda been plucked from decades ago." and then played this guitar orgy that is "Driftin' Back". While listening to this 27+ minute song, she began reminiscing because she had hung out with Young quite a bit.






      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmHljOmSw6I
      Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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      • #4
        I have to tell an ego-stroking Mike Bloomfield story because it's one of the proudest moments in my musical life. My band was opening for the Electric Flag (in addition to Bloomfield on guitar, Harvey Brooks was on bass) and I was getting offstage while Mike Bloomfield was coming onstage. He said "Was that you on guitar? Man, it sounded like Coltrane or something!" So not only did I get a compliment from one of my musical heroes, he compared me to another one of my musical heroes. Really, it doesn't get much better than that I was floating two feet off the ground for weeks afterward.
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        • #5
          Hell yeah!!!!!!! That's awesome, and an insanely cool comparison. I do really like your guitar playing with Mandrake Memorial, whether it's cool psychedelic stuff, rhythmic things, more "out" sort of stuff, rackety stuff, or odd noises.



          I think I mentioned to you before that I had was sharing a bill with Nels Cline. I got off stage, and he came up and said, "I really like your guitar playing." I was momentarily stunned and probably stood their with my mouth open (I'm an inventive guitar player, I'd like to think, but not very technical at all, and no, I'm not being modest ).
          Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
            View Post

            I have to tell an ego-stroking Mike Bloomfield story because it's one of the proudest moments in my musical life. My band was opening for the Electric Flag (in addition to Bloomfield on guitar, Harvey Brooks was on bass) and I was getting offstage while Mike Bloomfield was coming onstage. He said "Was that you on guitar? Man, it sounded like Coltrane or something!" So not only did I get a compliment from one of my musical heroes, he compared me to another one of my musical heroes. Really, it doesn't get much better than that I was floating two feet off the ground for weeks afterward.




            Very very groovy story!
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            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
              View Post

              I have to tell an ego-stroking Mike Bloomfield story because it's one of the proudest moments in my musical life. My band was opening for the Electric Flag (in addition to Bloomfield on guitar, Harvey Brooks was on bass) and I was getting offstage while Mike Bloomfield was coming onstage. He said "Was that you on guitar? Man, it sounded like Coltrane or something!" So not only did I get a compliment from one of my musical heroes, he compared me to another one of my musical heroes. Really, it doesn't get much better than that I was floating two feet off the ground for weeks afterward.




              That`s pretty cool. Considering Coltrane... was he referring to Trane`s early years or later... Ascension?



              Two different animals there mate!

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              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by UstadKhanAli
                View Post



                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaV-S5ivX3E





                So on Thanksgiving we were hanging out with this lady who was in Topanga in the 1960s, and was a groupie, hanging out with Neil Young and all these bands and telling all sorts of stories about the scene then.



                She played the above song, and I was really impressed, having heard of Paul Butterfield before but not being really familiar with this. I especially love the energetic Arabesque guitar break in the middle, but it's all good.




                It's a great track. My favorite from a great band. Bloomfield really blew open a lot of ears back then. But, clearly, it's a full group effort; still, Butterfield's harp and Bloomfield's leads trade back and forth and set the culture clash thing up... the guitar's eastern modalities playing against the blues harp.





                PS -- To Craig, that is awesome.
                .

                music and social links | recent listening

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                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by blue2blue
                  View Post

                  PS -- To Craig, that is awesome.




                  Stellar, even.

                  --
                  "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                  Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

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                  • #10
                    Stelllllaaa!
                    .

                    music and social links | recent listening

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                    • #11
                      That track is pretty much the first example of an extended improv by a rock band (even if they called themselves a blues band*). Historically only the Byrds "Eight Miles High" comes close to the level of importance in the history of rock as an improvisational music form. Psychedelic and progressive rock and fusion might never have happened if the Butterfield band (esp Bloomfield) hadn't done such a great job with East-West.



                      Its a shame Bloomfield never stretched out like that in the latter part of his career.



                      *and they were as much, or more, of a legitimate blues band as any other white band, before or after their existence
                      "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act."- George Orwell

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                      • #12






                        Quote Originally Posted by UstadKhanAli
                        View Post

                        Hell yeah!!!!!!! That's awesome, and an insanely cool comparison. I do really like your guitar playing with Mandrake Memorial, whether it's cool psychedelic stuff, rhythmic things, more "out" sort of stuff, rackety stuff, or odd noises.



                        I think I mentioned to you before that I had was sharing a bill with Nels Cline. I got off stage, and he came up and said, "I really like your guitar playing." I was momentarily stunned and probably stood their with my mouth open (I'm an inventive guitar player, I'd like to think, but not very technical at all, and no, I'm not being modest ).




                        No one's ever complimented my guitar-playing



                        My bass-playing, yes, but never my guitar-playing
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                        • #13






                          Quote Originally Posted by MarkydeSad
                          View Post

                          No one's ever complimented my guitar-playing



                          My bass-playing, yes, but never my guitar-playing




                          thats ok... youre waaaay cuter than most of these guys...
                          my p0asting days were numb bird... now im done... bye.

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by MarkydeSad
                            View Post

                            No one's ever complimented my guitar-playing



                            My bass-playing, yes, but never my guitar-playing




                            thats ok... youre waaaay cuter than most of these guys...
                            my p0asting days were numb bird... now im done... bye.

                            Comment


                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by Hard Truth
                              View Post

                              That track is pretty much the first example of an extended improv by a rock band (even if they called themselves a blues band*). Historically only the Byrds "Eight Miles High" comes close to the level of importance in the history of rock as an improvisational music form. Psychedelic and progressive rock and fusion might never have happened if the Butterfield band (esp Bloomfield) hadn't done such a great job with East-West.



                              Its a shame Bloomfield never stretched out like that in the latter part of his career.



                              *and they were as much, or more, of a legitimate blues band as any other white band, before or after their existence




                              Well, cool, that's very interesting, as I didn't realize what a historical impact "East-West" had.



                              Are you aware of Bloomfield stretching out with anything other than that album? I listened to Electric Flag, which is very different, and there too, that's apparently ground-breaking, as that is a rock group uses a horn section but pre-dates Blood Sweat and Tears, Chicago/CTA, etc.



                              Thanks!
                              Ken Lee on 500px / Ken's Photo Store / Ken Lee Photography Facebook Website / Blueberry Buddha Studios / Ajanta Palace Houseboat - Kashmir / Hotel Green View - Kashmir / Eleven Shadows website / Ken Lee Photography Blog / Akai 12-track tape transfers / MY NEW ALBUM! The Mercury Seven

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