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Current songs with VVBV structure?

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  • Current songs with VVBV structure?

    Hey guys,

    Can you list any current songs (2000s and newer) by a popular artist that use the song structure VVBV (verse-verse-bridge-verse) ? I know these days the most popular songs are usually chorus-heavy, but can you think of any exceptions to this?

    A perfect example of this song structure would be Sting's Fields of Gold.
    Last edited by davie; 06-21-2014, 07:54 AM.
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  • #2
    I'm sure there are but what I noticed most lately is the combination of many different forms. AABA then a chorus and maybe back to a ABA and a final double chorus. These sorts of things can still appear to adhere to a verse chorus structure but internally can be much more developed an interesting. Taking large scale form and condensing it is something classical composers have done forever. That's why even when it is some throwaway pop artist but the production is good I check out the form. Some of these guys are monsters at that. The bucket of inspiration is huge if you don't turn it off to quick.
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    • #3
      I'm trying find some successful song examples of the VVBV structures, songs without choruses. I want to figure out if its still do-able in current music. I'm compiling a list of songs to release. There's one song that seems to be lending on the strong sounding verse that ends with the song title at the end of each verse. Which in a way feels like a catchy verse that can be repeated as if its a "calm chorus" extended throughout a single song.
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      • #4
        When I was doing more contemporary sounding music, I found that the need to switch up sections and textures demanded by electronic pop seemed to trump other considerations. I would sometimes end up with lyrical structures that were all verse with various breaks (no lyrical refrain)... but since electronica becomes so static without aggressive changeups, the tracks would typically use the arrangement/production elements to create sections and build and release musical tension.

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        • #5

          Originally posted by blue2blue View Post
          When I was doing more contemporary sounding music, I found that the need to switch up sections and textures demanded by electronic pop seemed to trump other considerations. I would sometimes end up with lyrical structures that were all verse with various breaks (no lyrical refrain)... but since electronica becomes so static without aggressive changeups, the tracks would typically use the arrangement/production elements to create sections and build and release musical tension.
          Yep.

          Many/most current pop songs use the same chord progressions for both the verse and chorus, so differentiating between the two often lies in the the arrangement/production.
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          • #6
            I'm sure it's possible to do, but I can't know any recent examples, nor does Wikipedia.

            Certain song forms just tend to sound dated. If you bust out an AAA ballad, it's going to sound very different than everything else on the radio. Similarly to AABA form. The question is, does the song from maintain interest and momentum, does it provide contrast? Don't overthink it - if, at the the end of your verse, after you've sung the title, it feels repetitive to go back to the start of the verse and repeat music the audience has just heard, even with a building arrangement, then you need a chorus. If not, then you don't. Don't worry about whether there have been recent examples. Also, OTOH there are a ton of songs that end the verse on the title and then go into a chorus with the same title, so that's a valid way to go.

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            • #7
              Haven't thought about it. I'd try some of the rootsy types - Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, Richard Thompson, John Prine, Iris Dement, Marcia Ball, Delbert McClinton, Keb Mo, Taj Mahal, Wilco, Hank Williams III....

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