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  • #31
    A simple polyrhythm being the 3 against 2. See the straight 1 2 3 4 below and see a pitch pattern below that. A B C aren't specific pitches, as in the notes A B and C. But rather just a representation of the pitch pattern. now accent each "A". This puts the accent first on beat 1, then 4, then 3 and so on. Polyrhythm and syncopation.


    | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 |

    | A b c A | b c A b | c A b c | A b c A|



    So kinda like the rhythm is in 4/4 and the melody is in 3/4? Am I reading you right?
    Beware of deepities.-- Daniel Dennett

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    • #32
      I've been on an Iron and Wine kick for a few years... really enjoy this guy's stuff.

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      • #33
        So kinda like the rhythm is in 4/4 and the melody is in 3/4? Am I reading you right?




        Exactly. It's a rhythm mostly associated with ragtime and later jazz. But it's a polyrhythm that came right off the plantation and into "Cakewalk" music first.
        __________
        Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
        Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
        Jesus

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        • #34
          This is music

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgsPAsno4OU

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          • #35
            "Summer's Gone," The Beach Boys, live in London, last week.

            “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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            • #36
              Fiona Apple:





              ::insert subject change here::

              My Introduction to Amos Lee was at a show in Pittsburgh with Bob Dylan and Elvis Costello. Phenomenal show all around.
              Aaron McDonald | Comic Book Music (and not comic book music)

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              • #37
                Fiona Apple:


                Indeed. She's kind of amazing.

                “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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                • #38


                  That is my main dude Jon Brion producing that unreleased version. I love it as well...



                  And producer here too...



                  Producing and playing the majority of instruments here...

                  __________
                  Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                  Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                  Jesus

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    The Russian Rag by George Cobb. A rag is a style based on early efforts to bring in some serious syncopation to turn of the century popular music. Where the previous Cakewalk had simple syncopation, the next step was just going too far! Those crazy kids and that damn rhythm! A "rag" is based on the idea of ragged rhythm. Syncopation. Get it?

                    So the story. George Cobb and friend at a restaurant. Cobb makes the bold statement, "I can rag any tune. Doesn't matter. I am the master of the rag and there isn't a melody or song that I can't rag." The friend dares him to try and rag Rachmaninoff's Prelude in C# minor. A fairly dark and haunting melody, a popular piece at the time. Impossible! But not for Cobb. He walks cross the restaurant, sits at the piano thinking about the Prelude in C# Minor. Then begins... and does an amazing job. To Cobb's surprise but not his friend's, Rachmaninoff was dining at the restaurant. Rachmaninoff walks over to Cobb and loud enough for the establishment to hear every word deadpans, "Nice tune, but the rhythms all wrong."

                    I really love what he later writes down, arranges and releases. His best known piece.


                    __________
                    Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                    Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                    Jesus

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      And BTW, in the Russian Rag above, at :17 through :19, that's a great example of the 3 against 4 polyrhythm I was talking about in the Cakewalk post. And for a more obvious example, go to 1:54...

                      | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 | 1 2 3 4 |

                      | A b c A | b c A b | c A b c | A b c A|
                      __________
                      Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                      Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                      Jesus

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        In a word, Lee: Fantastic! Thanks for posting.

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                        • #42
                          In a word, Lee: Fantastic! Thanks for posting.


                          Are you referring to the Russian Rag? Pretty cool stuff.
                          __________
                          Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                          Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                          Jesus

                          Comment













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