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Poplar shells vs. Maple Shells.

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  • Poplar shells vs. Maple Shells.

    How do poplar shells lineup against maple shells?
    Drums

    Gig Setup:

    Pork Pie Custom Black & Silver Sparkle Shells
    24x20 Kick
    12" Rack Tom
    16" Floor Tom
    5.5x14 Pearl Snare

    14" Sabian AAX Metal Hats
    16" Zildjian A Custom China
    18" Sabian AAXplosion Crash
    18" Sabian HHX Evolution Crash
    20" Sabian AA Medium Ride
    6" Zildjian Zil-bel

    Home Setup:

    Pacific CX Maple Shells
    22" Kick
    10" Tom
    12" Tom
    14" Tom
    7x12 Black Panther Cherry Maple Snare
    3x13 Ludwig Piccolo Snare

  • #2
    On a level playing field, the maple shells sound MUCH better than poplar. I own a poplar Pearl Export kit, doesn't sound that great. Poplar is cheap so it's usually found on the lower level kits, not too many 4 piece poplar kits that go for $2000.
    All information subject to change without notice or rationale.

    Comment


    • #3
      Poplar...


      eeewwwww
      Originally Posted by Jesse G


      EMG's are like McDonald's cheeseburgers of the pickup world

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      • #4
        Poplar is absolute **************** for musical instruments.

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        • #5
          Poplar is absolute **************** for musical instruments.



          That's an extreme exaggeration. As Pearlplayer here can attest, poplar emulates the sound of birch, although does not have the dynamic range.

          Poplar is ok, it's neither junk, nor is it high end. It actually mixes down very good under amplification.

          One of the greatest drum makers, Greg Gaylord of DRUMSOLO makes a great poplar snare:

          http://www.drumsolo.cc/snare_drums/snare_gallery/Poplar/poplar.htm

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          • #6
            Well, from my experience with the wood, it is only used in crappy low level instruments. Thank you for informing me of it's use in better quality stuff.

            Comment


            • #7
              How do poplar shells lineup against maple shells?
              Actually,poplar shells are somewhat softer than usa maple or canadian rock maple,has a sound that somewhat resembles maple,doesnt
              project as well,the Ludwig Accent line is constructed of poplar with something else with it,

              Comment


              • #8
                Actually,poplar shells are somewhat softer than usa maple or canadian rock maple,has a sound that somewhat resembles maple,doesnt
                project as well,the Ludwig Accent line is constructed of poplar with something else with it,



                Poplar is only about 540-650 on the janka hardness scale compare to rock maple which is 1480.

                It's not quite as soft as basswood or luuan, but definately no match for maple.

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                • #9
                  Poplar was what the studios were using back before birch became all the vogue. It isn't uncommon to see a Tama Imperialstar in pristine shape because it spent 30 years in the studio.
                  An amateur practices until he gets it right. A professional practices until he can't get it wrong.

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                  • #10
                    Poplar was what the studios were using back before birch became all the vogue. It isn't uncommon to see a Tama Imperialstar in pristine shape because it spent 30 years in the studio.


                    I cannot remember what those were made of, and I had a kit. I seem to remember "select streight-grained hardwood." It was something like poplar or mahogany...but definately not maple.

                    I know people who raved about the kits and recorded with them...including Stewart Copeland and possibly Simon Phillips.

                    Back then, it was the sound, not the wood or the "RIMS" system.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I cannot remember what those were made of, and I had a kit. I seem to remember "select streight-grained hardwood." It was something like poplar or mahogany...but definately not maple.

                      I know people who raved about the kits and recorded with them...including Stewart Copeland and possibly Simon Phillips.

                      Back then, it was the sound, not the wood or the "RIMS" system.


                      I guess I should have stated that Imperialstars were made from poplar. Lots of the studio cats would also spraypaint the interior of the shells or install a May Micing system into them.
                      An amateur practices until he gets it right. A professional practices until he can't get it wrong.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I thought maple shells were popular?

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                        • #13
                          I thought maple shells were popular?


                          Travis Barker is poplar now... :P

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The people that think poplar is only with the cheap sets or beginners sets haven't checked out the really expensive sets, or they would see poplar is used in so many of the most expensive sets out there.

                            Of course if you only ever look at the cheap and not above the mid range sets you generally see poplar in the cheap sets, but if you go to the couple thousand dollars 4 and 5 piece sets its maple and poplar.

                            I've had stainless steel Ludwig, and maple, and other sets of birch, Philippine mahogany, maple, oak, and poplar.

                            It's mainly a matter of taste and personal preference.
                            Regardless of the wood used, it's how you tune them and the heads that make the most difference.
                            Bearing edges, and especially the manufacturer.

                            I have two acoustic sets, and next to each other, one poplar one maple, both have evans g1 heads.
                            I even mix the two sets together sometimes to make a larger set and they have the same attack and decay and amount of resonance.
                            .
                            They sound so close you wouldn't know they were different wood types.

                            But in the end, the most important things are good quality cymbals.

                            You can make a bad drum set sound better but you can't make bad cymbals sound better.

                            If your cymbals sound like garbage can lids or steel plates, nothing you play will sound right regardless of the type of wood your drums are made of.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              So... what cymbals do you recommend fusseltier?

                              BTW, welcome to HC!

                              **********

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                              - George Carlin

                              "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

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