Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

RE: "Issues with drummer" thread

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    the drummer is ultimately responsible.


    What do you mean by this? If the singer can't stay on tempo, then it's our fault?
    "If you can't play the blues...you might as well hang it up." - Dexter Gordon

    Comment


    • #32
      Count it off and chick or click along. In the second instance, a simple lead in would do. If things go off the scale without drums, it would be acceptable to play time through the rests. Clapping would work as well.


      CAN do any of that, of course, however intrusive it may/will be to the song itself.

      However, by choice, WON'T do that in most instances, because it is, or is likely to be intrusive to the song itself.

      Again, it's not not my/your responsibility to make up for someone else's shortcomings.
      Perhaps you are ok playing with others who require you to act as a crutch for them.
      I choose not to; if someone can't keep close enough time on their own, I'd never stand playing with them. It's like them not being able to even tune; inexcusable.
      For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

      Comment


      • #33

        if someone can't keep close enough time on their own, I'd never stand playing with them. It's like them not being able to even tune; inexcusable.


        +1, afterall we are discussing perhaps the first fundamental of playing music. I had a band teacher ask me once "what's worse, being off time or playing the wrong note?". He explained it's better to be on time because either way the note will be wrong.

        Comment


        • #34
          When we do "Summer of 69" the lead player would always lose the beat during the break. I now play quarter notes on the hi hat to help him out. Not that big a deal. Audience doesn't seem to notice.
          Here's a tip - if you put out some horrible lo-fi recording that sounds like a Gorilla banging an antelope while using a vacuum with a bad belt drive to suck up a floor full of marbles and silverware - and folks don't line up in mass numbers to hop on your wagon... maybe it ain't us who don't "get it". - THX1138

          Comment


          • #35
            It is not the drummer's responsibility to "keep" time, it is his responsibility to "create" time. If a song needs to speed up a couple bpm to create tension, or slow a couble bpm for a softer passage, it it the drummer's duty to lead the way. But that is talking about dynamics and I'm afraid that is something long forgotten in today's music. Music should be allowed to breathe, not be locked into a set click track. A conductor doesn't worry about keeping perfect time as he/she is conducting, the feel of the song is too important for that.
            Try setting a metronome on any of the old stuff. By the end of the song you will be no where close, yet really have no idea where the beats were lost because the groove never left, the beat seemed rock solid. It was all about the band following the drummer's creative use of time.
            sound clips:

            http://www.youtube.com/rdrummer322

            Comment


            • #36
              It is not the drummer's responsibility to "keep" time, it is his responsibility to "create" time. If a song needs to speed up a couple bpm to create tension, or slow a couble bpm for a softer passage, it it the drummer's duty to lead the way. But that is talking about dynamics and I'm afraid that is something long forgotten in today's music. Music should be allowed to breathe, not be locked into a set click track. A conductor doesn't worry about keeping perfect time as he/she is conducting, the feel of the song is too important for that.
              Try setting a metronome on any of the old stuff. By the end of the song you will be no where close, yet really have no idea where the beats were lost because the groove never left, the beat seemed rock solid. It was all about the band following the drummer's creative use of time.


              Ok. I'm feelin' this.
              Originally Posted by Chicken Monkey


              You've watched too many romantic comedies. In real life, spilling your guts never leads to spilling your nuts.



              A story should be just like a good skirt. Long enough to cover the subject but short enough to keep it interesting.
              -Eighty year old guy at the bank.


              Founding Member of the Vampire Batman Hunting Team

              Comment


              • #37
                CAN do any of that, of course, however intrusive it may/will be to the song itself.

                However, by choice, WON'T do that in most instances, because it is, or is likely to be intrusive to the song itself.

                Again, it's not not my/your responsibility to make up for someone else's shortcomings.
                Perhaps you are ok playing with others who require you to act as a crutch for them.
                I choose not to; if someone can't keep close enough time on their own, I'd never stand playing with them. It's like them not being able to even tune; inexcusable.


                If you have the option of climbing to clear air, sure.
                Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...







                Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

                Comment


                • #38
                  It is not the drummer's responsibility to "keep" time, it is his responsibility to "create" time. If a song needs to speed up a couple bpm to create tension, or slow a couble bpm for a softer passage, it it the drummer's duty to lead the way. But that is talking about dynamics and I'm afraid that is something long forgotten in today's music. Music should be allowed to breathe, not be locked into a set click track. A conductor doesn't worry about keeping perfect time as he/she is conducting, the feel of the song is too important for that.
                  Try setting a metronome on any of the old stuff. By the end of the song you will be no where close, yet really have no idea where the beats were lost because the groove never left, the beat seemed rock solid. It was all about the band following the drummer's creative use of time.


                  first sound pile o' words yet.
                  i miss you, mark
                  r.i.p. rudy

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    It is not the drummer's responsibility to "keep" time, it is his responsibility to "create" time. If a song needs to speed up a couple bpm to create tension, or slow a couble bpm for a softer passage, it it the drummer's duty to lead the way. But that is talking about dynamics and I'm afraid that is something long forgotten in today's music. Music should be allowed to breathe, not be locked into a set click track. A conductor doesn't worry about keeping perfect time as he/she is conducting, the feel of the song is too important for that.
                    Try setting a metronome on any of the old stuff. By the end of the song you will be no where close, yet really have no idea where the beats were lost because the groove never left, the beat seemed rock solid. It was all about the band following the drummer's creative use of time.


                    I could not have said it any better. Very well put.
                    "If you can't SAY something with your instrument, try sellin' cars."-
                    The late, great Tony Williams

                    www.russleonardi.com
                    www.zephyrsound.com
                    — Sonor Designer Maple shell (heavy) 8 pc. for studio
                    — Premier Genista 7 pc. for live gigs
                    — Tama Silverstar "Metro" 4pc. for certain live gigs.
                    — Paiste, Bosphorus and Sabian cymbals, depending on what I'm doin'.
                    — Small collection of assorted snare drums to suit my mood.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      It is not the drummer's responsibility to "keep" time, it is his responsibility to "create" time. If a song needs to speed up a couple bpm to create tension, or slow a couble bpm for a softer passage, it it the drummer's duty to lead the way. But that is talking about dynamics and I'm afraid that is something long forgotten in today's music. Music should be allowed to breathe, not be locked into a set click track. A conductor doesn't worry about keeping perfect time as he/she is conducting, the feel of the song is too important for that.
                      Try setting a metronome on any of the old stuff. By the end of the song you will be no where close, yet really have no idea where the beats were lost because the groove never left, the beat seemed rock solid. It was all about the band following the drummer's creative use of time.
                      oooh yeah, well said.
                      I'm blatman.
                      www.timhofmann.org

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        here we come to the distinction between responsibility and problem. If I park my car with the left front wheel on somebody's chest, that's my responsibility. but when you get down to the nitty-gritty, it ain't my problem.

                        Good time is a desirable attribute in any musician. The ability to overpower other musicians' ****************ty time is an often necessary attribute that a strong drummer will possess.


                        I believe the expression: lol wutt? to be appropriate here.

                        Srsly though, three half assed veterans with lousy time can easily turn the tables on the impeccable drummer by simply feigning consternation. In perfect unison of course.
                        Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...







                        Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Non - drummer here (actually I own a kit but it's mostly used for jams/practice by others). Questions for you folks:

                          -I agree it's everyone's responsibility to keep the time together. If the bassist speeds up what do you guys do?

                          -If there are recurring tempo issues, do you point it out to the band and/or the offender? Does the situation improve after doing so?

                          -Anyone just say f*ck it (a band) over time and feel issues?


                          Thanks!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I'd almost feel relieved if the bass sped up(in my experience they're the first to drag). But seriously I try to stay as solid as possible and hopefully he'll realize he's rushing. The key is everyone always listening with the respect to the song and being able to compromise without playing against each other. If someone starts a song too slow I don't rush until we're there, I try to make the best of the tempo given.

                            Recurring issues must be addressed. Running the tune a few times with a metronome can often be an eye opener, if it's live I'll straight up tell someone and I certainly welcome feedback from my bandmates as well. Nobody's perfect, the occasional slip up can mess up your time, but knowing how to recover without the audience knowing is something that comes with repitition and experience.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              ....Nobody's perfect, the occasional slip up can mess up your time, but knowing how to recover without the audience knowing is something that comes with repitition and experience.


                              ^ this.

                              Drummers "Prime Directive": Don't break the groove.


                              Good playing can hide a crappy drumset, but even the best drumset can't hide crappy playing.

                              Have no fear of perfection. You'll never reach it.- Salvador Dali

                              Some of the best players that I know really can't play the drums well, but they play music superlatively well. - Jim Chapin

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Eye contact. I've found that if the bassist and I are getting off, if we make eye contact we can get it back together pretty easily, regardless of who's at fault.

                                If we're just sh*tting around, sometimes I'll just say screw it and whatever happens, happens (I have never had this mentality onstage, by the way--just when jamming for fun)
                                "If you can't play the blues...you might as well hang it up." - Dexter Gordon

                                Comment













                                Working...
                                X