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Electronic Drums: Alesis DM8 Pro Kit vs. Roland TD-4K2

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  • Electronic Drums: Alesis DM8 Pro Kit vs. Roland TD-4K2

    I know, I know. The popular opinion is that electronic kits aren't great. I'm moving into an apartment though and need a practice kit. That and my acoustics are loud as hell. I'm a guitarist first so I'm not looking for a Pro level set. I'm most likely selling my small second hand custom kit to find this.

    What I want:
    -Under $1,000
    -Ability to run into my Presonus Firebox-> Adobe Audition for demo tracks
    -Decent quality (obviously)

    Alesis: http://www.zzounds.com/item--ALEDM8PROKIT

    Roland: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/drums-percussion/roland-td-4k2-s-v-compact-series-drum-set

    I'm open to other ideas. I'm leaning towards the Alesis but am a little skeptical of the pads. Does anyone have experience with either? I've even looking to make the move and now that it's tax time it seems right.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Roland.

    The Alesis stuff is a bit junky, and they have nowhere near the track record of the Roland gear.
    For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

    Comment


    • #3
      Sounds good. Watching more videos makes that look like the right way to go.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ok, I went and tried them out. Did NOT like the Alesis at all. Felt cheap. Roland was nice but I found myself wanting the TD-4KX2 for the all mesh heads.

        I want to go try some Yamaha's now though. The DTX530 has caught my eye. The MIDI capability would probably be nice as well. I think SamAsh carries them so I'm gonna try and go in the next week.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you'll be in an apartment without too much soundproofing, mesh is the way to go -- but you're going to need to watch your pedals, no matter what they're hitting. If you've got a computer, you can get much better sound using that than using the Roland (TD-4) sounds, remember, so I'd definitely recommend MIDI over audio connection as the way to go. (Of course, you could go for a TD-30, which sounds pretty good.)
          "...But how do you play with people, for people. Playing fast around the drums is one thing. But to play with people for others, to listen to, that's something else. That's a whole other world." -- Tony Williams
          Something random

          Comment


          • #6
            If you'll be in an apartment without too much soundproofing, mesh is the way to go -- but you're going to need to watch your pedals, no matter what they're hitting. If you've got a computer, you can get much better sound using that than using the Roland (TD-4) sounds, remember, so I'd definitely recommend MIDI over audio connection as the way to go. (Of course, you could go for a TD-30, which sounds pretty good.)


            Thanks. We want to be on the first floor so obviously that cuts down the worry of pedal noise. I also don't use a double bass pedal. I like the Yamaha kits but I'm not sure if I want to spring for the 560 over the 530.

            Comment


            • #7
              How would be the DM8 for a kid just starting out? My 12 years old want a drum kit. I woulde love to buy the real thing but it's impossible in my house.

              I looked at the same models and one from Yamaha (doesn't recall the model). I found a DM8 USB (not the Pro) brand new for 550$ and was tempted.

              Just looking for some advice.
              BenoA

              BenoA on Youtube
              Clips and other tunes by BenoA
              BenoA on Soundcloud
              Guitar And Sound (GAS) forum
              BenoA's band: Sonicstate

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              • #8
                The USB kits (there are a lot of brands that all look much of a muchness) are okay if you kid's just trying out. Don't expect to get any mileage from them.
                "...But how do you play with people, for people. Playing fast around the drums is one thing. But to play with people for others, to listen to, that's something else. That's a whole other world." -- Tony Williams
                Something random

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ugghhhh, the DM8 Pro kit is available for $625 right now. That's literally HALF of the TD-4KX that I'm looking at. Decisions...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ^^^^ Very curious about the DM8 and Alesis...

                    But went shopping today and 2 local retailer told me that Alesis drum kits aren't reliable and that their service support sucks.

                    Both places told me to go Roland or Yamaha...
                    BenoA

                    BenoA on Youtube
                    Clips and other tunes by BenoA
                    BenoA on Soundcloud
                    Guitar And Sound (GAS) forum
                    BenoA's band: Sonicstate

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wonder how much kickback the retailers get for Y & R compared with "other brands"...
                      "...But how do you play with people, for people. Playing fast around the drums is one thing. But to play with people for others, to listen to, that's something else. That's a whole other world." -- Tony Williams
                      Something random

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I wonder how much kickback the retailers get for Y & R compared with "other brands"...


                        There maybe some truth to that but at the same time they are the industry leaders in edrums for a reason. Their R&D budgets pretty much insure they will lead the pack in terms of technical innovations, and at this point quality. Buying an e kit from the big two is an extremely safe bet.

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                        • #13
                          I wonder how much kickback the retailers get for Y & R compared with "other brands"...


                          At the corporate level, there is almost certainly some amount of co-pay for prime placement in advertising and on the retail floor, but in my experience, that only happens for those who can afford AND back it with gear that works. Junk will always be known as junk.
                          In the stores themselves, nobody is telling the guy on the floor to push one over the other.

                          Soundcreation's point about R&D, and being ahead in terms of capabilities, quality and support is the answer here.
                          For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Agreed on the quality difference. I'm talking sales approach, though. If the sales guy can see the customer needs a cheap and nasty solution, are they going to say "Hey, we've these... but they'll last you a year" when they're getting $0.20 a sale against pushing a Roland or Yamaha kit well above requirements? Like I said earlier, if you're serious about needing an e-kit that's going to last, you don't want any of the cheap brands, from what I hear: no or limited flexibility and expandability, sometimes no MIDI, etc.
                            "...But how do you play with people, for people. Playing fast around the drums is one thing. But to play with people for others, to listen to, that's something else. That's a whole other world." -- Tony Williams
                            Something random

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Agreed on the quality difference. I'm talking sales approach, though. If the sales guy can see the customer needs a cheap and nasty solution, are they going to say "Hey, we've these... but they'll last you a year" when they're getting $0.20 a sale against pushing a Roland or Yamaha kit well above requirements? Like I said earlier, if you're serious about needing an e-kit that's going to last, you don't want any of the cheap brands, from what I hear: no or limited flexibility and expandability, sometimes no MIDI, etc.


                              I can only speak from my experience and from that of close friends who I worked with, but...

                              We told people warts and all about things.
                              The thing is, pushing the Roland or Yamaha wasn't going to get you a sale for someone who was never going to spend that dough in the first place, but you made no friends if you sold someone junk as if it was good. You tell them it's junk and they buy anyway, they don't hold it against you and maybe come back for something better, from you (the guy who was honest) when they are ready to spend.

                              The shops I worked in (chain and independent) were known for having pro clients as well as Mom & Pop shoppers who knew nothing; you don't keep those clients by pulling the wool over their eyes once and hoping they fall for it again.

                              And the way commissions are set in the big box stores, you might make $0.50 on the Roland kit vs. $0.20 on the Alesis, so in the end, you're making squat regardless.
                              For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

                              Comment



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