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I tuned up my toms last night...

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  • I tuned up my toms last night...

    That was a good feeling.....

     

     

    But seriously, I've always tuned my toms JAW. Last night, before practice, I tuned up considerably higher, and it made a very positive difference.I've always felt my toms were a little under the mix when considering my snare and cymbals, and now it seems they project a lot more.

     

    Until last week, I hadn't played drums since November. While it is a bummer that I've lost some of my chops, and I'm working to recover my gained skill, I think it really helped my playing. I'm playing the things I've heard in my head over the last few months and it's flowing fairly easily.

    Not much else to say except damn it's good to be gangster.

    Don't Sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things

  • #2

    Story checks out. JAW-tuned toms have a mean, short "whump" from the driver's seat, but they are all attack out front. Toms need to be tuned until they ring and have overtones to sound right in the room.

    Tauntr.com - Adding Insult to Everything!Neck Pocket Cavern Surveyor for the Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You club!"In all fairness, Les Pauls have a switch position labeled "Rhythm", while Strats do not, because they are lead guitars for lead guitarists." -Flatspotter

    Comment


    • Merlin Coryell
      Merlin Coryell commented
      Editing a comment

      Or you need to stop being lazy Grem, and mic your toms. Wait till you check out the kit with the Black Chromes on it, tuned JAW and major sound output, but will sound even better when mic'd for the 3/15 show!

       

      But Ive always hated ringy toms myself. I prefer the drum to make its sound and then graciously back away, not remain singing when 3 of his brothers have also been struck.


  • #3
    sadly, i have to agree with storyeg.
    i miss you, mark
    r.i.p. rudy

    Comment


    • devinw
      devinw commented
      Editing a comment


    • Drumstix101
      Drumstix101 commented
      Editing a comment
      sadly, i have to agree with storyeg.

      He didn't last long. Gone in the blink of an eye. Kudos to our moderators, they are on top of things.


  • #4

    Grem, if they're unmiked when you perform, you want them to be at a higher pitch and to sustain. (Best way to do that is to tune both heads to the same pitch.) That way they will have some chance at being heard out front.

    Not to worry--the sustain you hear at the kit is not audible from the audience, they'll just hear louder toms.

    Biggest mistake I see in young drummers is to tune and muffle the drums as if they will be miked and then play them unmiked. They sound great at the driver's seat but are all but inaudible from the audience. That goes for all the drums, BTW. Want your bass drum to be heard unmiked? Make it go boooooom. Snare drum? Unmuffled and lively. Both very loud out front and the sustain just isn't heard--but the drums are.

    Miked kit, different story, as Merlin notes.

     

     

     

     

    Originally posted by marko46:"Thoose 70's Avedis sound no where like poop. I've heard poop, not even similar."Originally posted by marko46:"I've seen some **************** on here, read some **************** on here, even been a part of some **************** on here, but that's some **************** there."Originally posted by Buddy Rich:"Be on time, wear a clean shirt, and swing your ass off."

    Comment


    • cdawg
      cdawg commented
      Editing a comment

      drumtechdad wrote:

      Grem, if they're unmiked when you perform, you want them to be at a higher pitch and to sustain. (Best way to do that is to tune both heads to the same pitch.) That way they will have some chance at being heard out front.

      Not to worry--the sustain you hear at the kit is not audible from the audience, they'll just hear louder toms.

      Biggest mistake I see in young drummers is to tune and muffle the drums as if they will be miked and then play them unmiked. They sound great at the driver's seat but are all but inaudible from the audience. That goes for all the drums, BTW. Want your bass drum to be heard unmiked? Make it go boooooom. Snare drum? Unmuffled and lively. Both very loud out front and the sustain just isn't heard--but the drums are.

      Miked kit, different story, as Merlin notes.

       

       

       

       


      speaks the truth.  usually now i find the "sweet spot" for each drum, then tune the bottom to match.  if too ringy, i just detune the bottom some.  as for the kick, i'm sold on using an unported front head.  i don't even muffle.  i will sometimes just detune one lug some, so the ring doesn't bounce around too much. 



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