Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Breaking down the simple 3 over 2?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Breaking down the simple 3 over 2?

    I'm adding some polyrhythm practice to my beginner's drum lessons. But the representations of 3 on 2 I've found confuse me:
    1 - - 2 - -
    r - r - r -
    L - - L - -
    (makes best sense in Courier or other monospace font)
    Problem is that space after 1 and just before end of measure imply unplayed beats. That adds up to six? And the 3; is it played like a triplet? Arg!

  • #2

    Is it a notation thing or is the figure escaping you? Basic polyrhythms are a lowest common multiple thing.

    2 against 3 would be 6.

    Given a stream of equal pulses, every 3rd pulse would be yield the two count and every 2nd pulse would yield the 3 count; the first pulse of every group of 6 being common.

    You can notate this in 3/4 6/8 or 2/4 with 2 sets of quarter note triplets - doesn't matter.

    The feel might be a bit of a stretch especially both ways but that comes with familiarity.

    The simplest notation I can think of :

    | quarter eighth eighth quarter | quarter eight eighth quarter | in 3/4

    Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...







    Write Something, or Drag and Drop Images Here...

    Comment


    • rishabhsachan
      rishabhsachan commented
      Editing a comment

      what the exaclty mean of this sentence


  • #3

    Here's a trick you can use to get a feel for it. Set a metronome to a comfortable tempo in 4/4. Play 8th note triplets to the metronome with both hands. Now, continue to play the triplets, but pull one hand away an play it in the air, so it makes no sound. What's left is the remaining hand that is making sound, and that is playing two 1/4 note triplets against the 4 beats of the metronome, or 6 against 4. Half of that measure is 3 against 2. In other words 3 against 2 is basically a 1/4 note triplet played against 2 1/4 notes.

    Hope that helps.

    "If you can't SAY something with your instrument, try sellin' cars."-
    The late, great Tony Williams

    www.russleonardi.com
    www.zephyrsound.com
    — Sonor Designer Maple shell (heavy) 8 pc. for studio
    — Premier Genista 7 pc. for live gigs
    — Tama Silverstar "Metro" 4pc. for certain live gigs.
    — Paiste, Bosphorus and Sabian cymbals, depending on what I'm doin'.
    — Small collection of assorted snare drums to suit my mood.

    Comment


    • danrothmusic
      danrothmusic commented
      Editing a comment

      fusionfunk wrote:

      Here's a trick you can use to get a feel for it. Set a metronome to a comfortable tempo in 4/4. Play 8th note triplets to the metronome with both hands. Now, continue to play the triplets, but pull one hand away an play it in the air, so it makes no sound. What's left is the remaining hand that is making sound, and that is playing two 1/4 note triplets against the 4 beats of the metronome, or 6 against 4. Half of that measure is 3 against 2. In other words 3 against 2 is basically a 1/4 note triplet played against 2 1/4 notes.

      Hope that helps.


      Yeah, that's how I think of it, too. Add your foot playing quarternotes and you've got your polyrythm.



Working...
X