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  • Today's Question: Are there any drum topics that you would like to see covered more often?



    Yes. Creativity and originality. We’re seeing more and more drummers playing covers, playing a million notes a second, and trying to sound like someone else. We need more people to step up and show other drummers (and musicians in general) that it’s more important to be original than it is to be someone else.
    www.kindbeatsdrums.com

    "Don't live in a world presented to you. Instead, become a creator of worlds."

    Comment








    • Quote Originally Posted by kindbeats
      View Post

      Today's Question: Do you use any type of muffling on your snare drum?



      I usually like to let my snare ring out but every once in a while, I’ll throw my wallet on there to get a dirtier funk sound out of it.




      Wide open, I prefer tuning, stick choice and/or hot rod sticks to adjust to playing situation. Though, on occasion, if one of those don't cut it I'll throw something on it like a wallet or moon gel.
      Missin' Marko46 http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/...lies/frown.png

      "I've never been given more to bear than I can endure."
      Marty Mann

      "In a world where carpenters get resurrected, everything is possible."
      Elanor in Lion in Winter

      "Good time is more relative than family."
      1001gear

      Comment


      • Usually just one piece of moongelgets it done. B.
        "It's alright if you only know 3 chords, but for God's sake, play them in the right order" - H. Hill

        Comment








        • Quote Originally Posted by kindbeats
          View Post

          Today's Question: Are there any drum topics that you would like to see covered more often?



          Yes. Creativity and originality. We’re seeing more and more drummers playing covers, playing a million notes a second, and trying to sound like someone else. We need more people to step up and show other drummers (and musicians in general) that it’s more important to be original than it is to be someone else.




          Ah, the age-old battle between "just like the record" and originality.



          I see it as a 'growth' thing, probably moreso for guys like me who are self-taught through imitation. When I was starting off, imitation was a way of learning more stuff since there was no teacher to guide me. But slowly, I started improvising more, mainly by throwing stuff from different songs into the one I happened to be playing at the moment. From there, fast forward a few decades, and now I rarely play anything "like the record".



          It amuses me that some of the guys I play with now, that have been playing for as long or longer than me, are still stuck in that "like the record" mode. They argue that "audiences will be expecting it" and will shun any variation. To them I use the Neil Sedaka example: Back in the 50's, he released 'Breaking Up is Hard to Do", in the style of the time - you know, with that double backbeat going. Then in the 70's, he re-released that tune as a slow jazz ballad, with great success!



          Now, if audiences actually 'shun' variation from the original, how did his re-release hit #1 on the charts? Per the "like the record" crowd, it should have been laughed off the air.... but it wasn't. So much for "like the record" mentality!


          Good playing can hide a crappy drumset, but even the best drumset can't hide crappy playing.

          Have no fear of perfection. You'll never reach it.- Salvador Dali

          Some of the best players that I know really can't play the drums well, but they play music superlatively well. - Jim Chapin

          Comment








          • Quote Originally Posted by the DW
            View Post

            Ah, the age-old battle between "just like the record" and originality.



            I see it as a 'growth' thing, probably moreso for guys like me who are self-taught through imitation. When I was starting off, imitation was a way of learning more stuff since there was no teacher to guide me. But slowly, I started improvising more, mainly by throwing stuff from different songs into the one I happened to be playing at the moment. From there, fast forward a few decades, and now I rarely play anything "like the record".



            It amuses me that some of the guys I play with now, that have been playing for as long or longer than me, are still stuck in that "like the record" mode. They argue that "audiences will be expecting it" and will shun any variation. To them I use the Neil Sedaka example: Back in the 50's, he released 'Breaking Up is Hard to Do", in the style of the time - you know, with that double backbeat going. Then in the 70's, he re-released that tune as a slow jazz ballad, with great success!



            Now, if audiences actually 'shun' variation from the original, how did his re-release hit #1 on the charts? Per the "like the record" crowd, it should have been laughed off the air.... but it wasn't. So much for "like the record" mentality!






            That's a total and complete non sequiter (i.e., it does not follow that...)...or do you really believe that the audience who made the song successful in the '50's is the exact same audience who he had success with in the '70's?



            The song found a NEW audience when re-recorded in a different style, which was more likely to be accepted by a new audience at the time (i.e., people who thought that the '50's style was maybe a little square, for example).







            On topic though, but with yet another non sequiter...I still don't understand why people would think/assume that playing covers is devoid of creativity.



            I strive for as close to the recorded version that we're using as possible, but I've never been more creative in how I approach drums/drumming/playing than right now. I may not be coming up with the parts I'm playing, but I've had to totally re-think my physical set-up, bring in new elements to the kit, change the way I approach numerous songs so that I can attain that goal, etc. My playing mindset has probably never been more creative.



            I suppose I could have left my kit as a 4 piece, 2 crash/hats/ride config like I'd been playing for 15+ years, made each and every song fit into that narrow idiom and merely thrown in a bunch of my own personal licks instead to keep it 'creative' too...
            For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

            Comment








            • Quote Originally Posted by kmart
              View Post

              That's a total and complete non sequiter (i.e., it does not follow that...)...or do you really believe that the audience who made the song successful in the '50's is the exact same audience who he had success with in the '70's?



              The song found a NEW audience when re-recorded in a different style, which was more likely to be accepted by a new audience at the time (i.e., people who thought that the '50's style was maybe a little square, for example).







              On topic though, but with yet another non sequiter...I still don't understand why people would think/assume that playing covers is devoid of creativity.



              I strive for as close to the recorded version that we're using as possible, but I've never been more creative in how I approach drums/drumming/playing than right now. I may not be coming up with the parts I'm playing, but I've had to totally re-think my physical set-up, bring in new elements to the kit, change the way I approach numerous songs so that I can attain that goal, etc. My playing mindset has probably never been more creative.



              I suppose I could have left my kit as a 4 piece, 2 crash/hats/ride config like I'd been playing for 15+ years, made each and every song fit into that narrow idiom and merely thrown in a bunch of my own personal licks instead to keep it 'creative' too...






              I don't necessarily think that all covers are completely devoid of creativity, but I do think the large majority of them lack originality and substance. It's usually people (over) playing (often poorly) a popular song (over the original recorded drum tracks, mind you) simply for the fact that they want to become the next big "youtube star". If someone is going to cover a popular song, I think it would be much cooler to do something really different and original with it. Just my two pennies.
              www.kindbeatsdrums.com

              "Don't live in a world presented to you. Instead, become a creator of worlds."

              Comment


              • Depends on what the definition of the word(s) "just like the recording" is. I can see keeping the intro very close and the structure the same. But after that IMHO it's silly to copy all the parts exactly to the letter. That may be fine for classical music, but it ain't rock 'n roll. Rock 'n roll is about sticking it to the man. Doing your own thing. It should be emotional and fun and danceable, and somewhat spontaneous.



                The bands that make the original recording don't do it exactly the same on stage. They usually play it faster. Deep Purple totally changed the riff up and added a few bars live to Smoke on the Water. When I saw Santana the last time he changed up one of the songs on his latest album which improved it.



                Most people wouldn't know if you played the drum part exactly like Bonzo or not. Unless of course it was the solo or intro to Rock And Roll or something. They may recognize the first 4 bars of a guitar solo, but that's about it.



                I'm not talking about doing Smells Like Teen Spirit as a tango or anything. Just not being 100% to the note on everything.



                I have improved (IMHO) the drum parts on some cover songs or added a drum solo or traded 4s with the guitarist. To me that is more "creative" than being a human juke box.
                P E A C E

                "A band that is not appearing is disappearing" -- Art Blakey

                "If you can't play the blues you might as well hang it up" -- Dexter Gordon

                http://myspace.com/boomboomdrumsYamaha Stage Custom Drum Kit (Marina Green)
                Ziljain, Paiste, Wuhan Cymbals
                1972 Slingerland wood Snare Drum
                KORG TR keyboard
                Cubase LE
                Tascam US-122 USB Interface
                George Steck Baby Grand Piano

                Comment








                • Quote Originally Posted by kindbeats
                  View Post

                  Today's Question: Are there any drum topics that you would like to see covered more often?




                  1.) Creating drum parts

                  2.) The physicality of drumming (fitness, diet, hydration, stretching, lifestyle)

                  3.) The sonic properties of wood and the acoustic properties of the room you play in

                  4.) How much chicks love drummers
                  Music, music, I hear music

                  Comment








                  • Quote Originally Posted by FitchFY
                    View Post

                    1.) Creating drum parts

                    2.) The physicality of drumming (fitness, diet, hydration, stretching, lifestyle)

                    3.) The sonic properties of wood and the acoustic properties of the room you play in

                    4.) How much chicks love drummers




                    Lmao!
                    www.kindbeatsdrums.com

                    "Don't live in a world presented to you. Instead, become a creator of worlds."

                    Comment


                    • Today's Question: Are There Any Drummers That You Consider To Have Unique Phrasing On The Instrument?



                      The first three that came to my mind were Max Roach, Billy Martin, and Jim Black. Who are a few drummers you guys consider to have unique phrasing?
                      www.kindbeatsdrums.com

                      "Don't live in a world presented to you. Instead, become a creator of worlds."

                      Comment


                      • Ziggabo,Billy Cobham,Staton Moore
                        great googley moogley- Frank ZappaMissing the CHEESE And MarkoHit it!__________if you can't spot the crazy one on the bus, it's probably you..............Cdawg________Good Sellers/Marko46,lossforgain x2

                        Comment


                        • Billy Cobham, Stewart Copeland, Benny Benjamin (Funk Bros), Ian Paice, Clyde Stubblefield, Terry Bozzio...



                          two interesting things:

                          1. some of these guys were doing things unique at the time

                          2. though it was unique at the time the things they were doing were taken from another musical context. For instance Ian Paice playing jazzish fills in heavy rock, Copeland taking Middle Eastern rhythms and applying them pop/new wave/punk



                          I'd have to say that the real innovators in that list were Cobham, Benjamin and Stubblefield.
                          Missin' Marko46 http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/...lies/frown.png

                          "I've never been given more to bear than I can endure."
                          Marty Mann

                          "In a world where carpenters get resurrected, everything is possible."
                          Elanor in Lion in Winter

                          "Good time is more relative than family."
                          1001gear

                          Comment


                          • Stanton Moore, Mike Mangini, and Jose Padillas (Incubus) came to mind right away.
                            Music, music, I hear music

                            Comment


                            • Grohl; nobody I've ever heard phrases anything like he does on the Probot, Them Crooked Vutures and QOTSA albums.
                              For cripe's sake, somebody buy that kid a freaking DICTIONARY already!

                              Comment


                              • Tomas Haake, strange phrasing is his bread and butter.

                                Comment



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